Heip!

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Ltcjkelly, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. Ltcjkelly

    Ltcjkelly New Member

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    Want start reloading but small scale. Less the 50rds per month. Loooking to load 45coltand APC also 257 and 38. Should I start with Lee hand press? Would dies for that work on later equipment if I expand to larger press?
  2. TCoggins

    TCoggins Member

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    Here's my opinion, which is worth the price you paid for it. I would look at the Lee Challenger kit. I have been using that for about two years now, and reload for .243, 45-70, 38 and 357. I have probably loaded a couple thousand rounds in the time I've used it. I can put three 243 bullets touching at 100 yards with my handloads. I can shoot the 45-70 for about 1/4 the cost of factory loads, and I have lost track of how many 38/357 loads I have gone through.

    Is there better equipment out there? Absolutely. This equipment works well for me. Your mileage may vary.

    To answer your question, the dies that you use in the Lee hand press would also work in a bench mounted press if you decided to upgrade later.

    Hope these aimless ramblings help out.

    Tim
  3. mikld

    mikld Member

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    Sure, you can easily load all the cartridge you mention with a Lee Hand Loader. Dies used in the Handloader are the same for all standard presses, so they can be used later, if you want to move up to a single stage or turret press. If you have room, a single stage, bench mounted press may be more convient for you, and easier to learn with, but the process is the same, tools the same, and both can make safe, accurate ammo.

    For any beginner I usually suggest a copy of The ABCs of Reloading and Lyman's 49th Edition Reloading Handbook. Read these and you will have an idea of what equipment will suit your reloading needs, from presses to all necessary tools.
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2012
  4. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    In short yes, but the best you could do on a low budget is as mentioned above, a lee single stage of some kind will fit you well. At your rate of reloading it would take quite some time to recover the costs in initial startup. Consider that reloading will enable you to shoot more volume for the same price as buying factory ammo when making the investment in a press, you may not want to get the setup that starts at over 1k, but also avoiding the bottom of the barrel. Enjoy
  5. Ltcjkelly

    Ltcjkelly New Member

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    Thanks. Space is a problem! And I'm not sure I would get into reloading. So really want to start at the low end. I do enjoy shooting however have little free time. thought the hand press would be something could put away when not being used. It would also be something to do on the nights I'm setting up with a mare getting ready to foal
  6. TCoggins

    TCoggins Member

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    While I have not used the hand press, it sounds like it may suit you well. And yes, if you upgrade later, all the dies will work with the new press.

    Also, I should have mentioned in my first reply to you, please do get a loading manual and read, read, read.

    Also, ask questions here. I am no expert, but there are a lot of them here, and when it comes to reloading, the only stupid question is the one you didn't ask.

    Tim
  7. cpttango30

    cpttango30 Guest

    It is so worth it.

    Me I can't recommend Lee equipment. I say go with a quality RCBS, Lyman, Hornady press and the stuff to go with it.
  8. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    My portable reloading kit is a Lee Hand Press.
    It works great for handgun cartridges. Larger rifle cases (like .270 or .25-06) can be a pain in the butt though...your arms get tired pretty quicklike when resizing a big rifle case.
    (I'm assuming your "257" is a typo for .357Magnum, but maybe it's .257Roberts)


    If you're limited on space, a small kit with a hand press, a good scale, and a few small extras will get the basics covered for you.
    A bench mounted press is nice if you have room for a decent sized bench though.
    Search through the older posts in the reloading forum here and you'll find a few threads on compact reloading benches that will work good if you're short on space (apartment dweller or just have a really small house).

    As mikld posted, be sure to start out with a manual or two and read the intro sections up front. They will give you a good idea of the basics that you'll need to get started.
    The Lyman manual and the Hornady manual are the two that I like to recommend to newbies

    And yup...don't be afraid to post up any more questions. Welcome to TFF!
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2012
  9. Hammerslagger

    Hammerslagger New Member

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    Lee makes good equipment. I would get a bench press, unless room or portability is an issue.
  10. mikld

    mikld Member

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    I can fit a Lee Hand Press, a pound of powder, a beam scale and a couple Lee dippers, a few hundred primers and bullets into a plastic shoebox...
  11. Twicepop

    Twicepop Member

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    To Ltcjkelly, I've been reloading my own for thirty plus years now for whatever that's worth to anyone. I've done all my loading from day one to present on a single stage press from different manufacturers, but my experiences with Lee equipment haven't always been positive. The hand press looks like it wood do a credible job if speed and numbers aren't an issue, but the hand press won't serve you as well as a solidly mounted press. If all your doing is a small ammount of loading for handgun calibers it looks as though this hand press will work. You may not be able to get enough leverage to properly size rifle cartridge cases. If just starting, get a couple of good reloading manuals, and read these thoroughly before starting. This like most other things, buy the best you can afford.

    those who beat their guns into plowshares, will plow for those who didn't