help identifying inherited rifle

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by krig51, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. krig51

    krig51 New Member

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    i'm new here. looks like a great forum for info & help !

    brother recently passed away & left me about a dozen old, collectible rifles.
    not very savvy with old guns (yet), lol.
    this one truly has me baffled (hope pics are ok).
    all identifying markings shown.

    any help greatly appreciated.
    ~kevin~

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  2. StoneChimney

    StoneChimney New Member

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    It's a Werder Carbine.
  3. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    yes it is , i have the pistol of this action , what a mechanical nighmare that is

    dont pull apart unless you KNOW what your doing , theres a heap of parts pins and such all crammed in together there .. nice weapons just really need to be up on it to do any servicing
  4. krig51

    krig51 New Member

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    thank you SO very much, StoneChimney !!

    and jack404 for the additional info !

    now i can have a blast doing some research on it.

    (not looking to service or fire it.... just wanted to ID & label it with the rest of collection)

    ;)

    ~kevin~
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  5. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

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    Is that thing complete? Can't figure out the ignition system.:eek:
  6. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    its complete !!

    here a pistol pic ( not mine )

    [​IMG]
  7. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  8. JohnRich

    JohnRich New Member

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    That "1. Ch. 4." on the buttplate tang looks like a typical German style unit marking. Research that, and you can figure out to what military unit the rifle was assigned, and from that you get an idea of what kind of action it might have participated in. I think it would be the 1st Chevauleger Regiment (Light Horses), 4th Company. Google "Chevauleger Regiment" and you get all kinds of interesting info.

    Very cool rifle!
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  9. dustydog

    dustydog New Member

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    Hard to find brass for them,had to get some 45-90 and trim/swedge/trim/swedge/fireform/trim,but a blast to shoot,handy,points great,and a good brush round for whitetail.BP only!
  10. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    As I remember, push the front "trigger" forward and the block drops down (Ala Martini Henry) and ejects the case. Drop in a loaded round and pull the lever on top back, closing the breech block and cocking the striker. (or is there a hammer in there somewhere. I don't remember....).
    It's actually a pretty fast action for a single shot.
  11. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Deleted
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  12. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Part C is the hammer. It is held cocked by the trigger/sear J fitting into either a full or a half cock notch. When it is not cocked, the breechblock A is held upward by the lever B until the bottom part of B is pushed forward. Then the spring D acts to push the rear of the breechblock A up, pivoting the front end down to allow loading. This also trips the ejector E to eject a fired case if there is one.

    When hammer C is cocked, cam F pushes the breechblock A upward, closing the gun and allowing part B to again support the breechblock. The trigger J can then be pulled, releasing the hammer to fire the cartridge by means of a conventional firing pin in the breechblock. The breechblock is supported against chamber pressure by its back end abutting on the frame at the rear. The safety is the half cock notch.

    Rube Goldberg would have loved it. The only thing missing is the part that pinches the tail of the cat, causing it to jump up.....

    The firing procedure starts with the hammer down, as when the gun has just been fired. The "backward trigger" is pressed forward to drop the breechblock, ejecting the fired case and allowing the chamber to be loaded. The hammer is then cocked, closing the breech, and the trigger pulled. Complicated it is, especially when compared with the much simpler Martini action, but it was quick and easy to use.

    Jim
  13. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

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    Holy crap!
    Does look like a Rube Goldberg invention!
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  14. RJay

    RJay Well-Known Member

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    :DGood Grief, I've been to a country fair, a church social, a goat rope and thought I had been to the mountain, but that one is new to me.:eek:
  15. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    good brush guns . we converted a few to .303 when they were available in the 60's and 70's

    action , better drawing

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
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