help me out on value of inherited gun?

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by bubbantenn, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. bubbantenn

    bubbantenn New Member

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    Jan 10, 2009
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    I have inherited a U.S. model of 1917 Eddystone rifle. It has an E near the muzzle of the barrel and 7-18 and also a ball with flames coming off of it, this symbol is also on other places on it. its in pretty nice shape, i will try to get some pics of it if needed, just wondering what its worth?
  2. guntech59

    guntech59 New Member

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    Your best bet would be to post clear pics of the rifle, including close ups of all the proof marks. It's impossible for the experts (I am NOT one) to help you without them.
  3. eka

    eka New Member

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    Dec 28, 2008
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    Well, first off congratulations on the new rifle. Look at the stock for any stamps in the wood. These are called cartouches. Check the bore for rust or pitting. You can Google the 1917 for the whole story, but the short version is that the Bristish version of this rifle, the P14 in .303, was being produced under contract for the British in this country just prior to WW1. After we entered the war, we adopted this rifle chambered in 30-06 to fill in for the shortages of the 1903 Springfield. These rifles were made at two arsenals. Eddystone in Eddystone, Pennsylvania and Winchester. The Winchester 1917 brings a little more money, but they are identical other than the markings. They were made by the millions and are strong strong guns. They served admirably throughout the war and then were arsenal reworked for the most part and then sent over seas as lend lease arm to our allies. A little heavier and not having quiet the gracefull handling qualities of the venerable 1903, but a strong and capable battle rifle for sure. Do not refinish it, sand it, or try to polish it up. You are just sanding the money off of it if you do. People that like these sort of things (like me) don't take a like'en to that kind of thing when it comes time to open their wallets. Without looking at it and being able to examine how much originality still exists and the current condition. You are probably looking at between $450.00 and $800.00. Condition is everything.

    Take care of it and enjoy.

    Keith
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2009
  4. bubbantenn

    bubbantenn New Member

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    finally got some pics... not the greatest prolly but... they are pics..lol what yall think? If it were to possibly be for sale... anyone interested and how much are ya willing to offer?

    Attached Files:

  5. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    the value has been reduced by the fact the stock has been sporterized. very common for p14,17 and 03's doesn't take away from it being a well made solid rifle
  6. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    one other note stocks can be had from a couple of places sarco or northridge sells stocks or at least they used to. as for the value in that condition ( modified stock) not sure but in sept 08 the cmp was selling service grade p-17 for 400.00
  7. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Looks a nice rifle. I bet it shoots well.

    By the way eka, the British police dont just say stop, some carry a stick.
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