Herbert Schmidt 22 lr, Dbl Action, 8 shot, Revolver

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by Rhuga, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. Rhuga

    Rhuga Member

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    This an uncommon revolver that was made in the 1960's or 70's. 4" Barrel, and 8" length overall. It is is in fine condition. Any idea what it is worth?

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    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013
  2. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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  3. SARGE7402

    SARGE7402 Member

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    They sold thru '68 in most of the major gun magazines for I think $12.00. so at $20 per ounce that should mean they'd be worth about $240 today. I paid less than $100 for the two that I've owned.

    PS both shot pretty good
  4. 3/2 STA SS

    3/2 STA SS Active Member

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    It's a good gun for trade fodder...
  5. wonderwhippet

    wonderwhippet Active Member

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    Very cheap pot metal construction. Save if for a gun buy back program. They might pay you $100 for it.
  6. Rhuga

    Rhuga Member

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    Thank you for the info. You folks are the greatest.
  7. Fatstrat

    Fatstrat Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, same metal, or close to it that is used in the Ruger 10/22 receiver. But no one seems to complain about that.
  8. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    10-22 receivers are aluminum, not zinc.
  9. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Active Member

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    Starting in the 1950's, West German manufacturers developed a substantial trade exporting inexpensive revolvers to the United States. A few of these guns were first class (mainly those made by Sauer), but most ranged from decent (Arminius/Weirauch) to poor (RG/Rohm). These latter companies could make and sell these guns cheaply by using new materials and methods, such as zinc alloy castings, and internal parts that appear to made of thick steel plate. The Gun Control Act of 1968 put a dent in this trade, but it was really the declining value of the US dollar in the late 1970's that ended it (IMHO).

    From what I have seen and read, Schmidt appears to have been in-between Arminius and RG in quality, but closer to RG. If their guns are scarce today, it is probably because of a low survival rate, and because few dealers want to bother with them. They are a hard thing to sell used, because they mostly sold to people who had very little money but wanted a pistol RIGHT NOW. I know the term is widely despised, but that seems to me to be a pretty good definition of a Saturday Night Special.

    Just like the Spanish guns of the First World War through the 1930's, there will probably be a time when collector's interest in these German guns grows - but I haven't seen any sign of that yet.

    All the above is just my $.02, as always.
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2013
  10. Fatstrat

    Fatstrat Well-Known Member

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    I disagree. While I've never owned a Herbert Schmidt DA revolver such as the OP owns. I have have owned many of the Schmidt and (nearly exact MFG Italian) Tanarmi SA revolvers. Most of which I purchased cheap in non working condition, then repaired. On not ONE of the broken guns I've purchased and repaired was the issue the quality of parts or receiver material. That zinc alloy metal is plenty, if not overly strong enough to withstand the pressures of a .22 revolver. Not that it's actually subjected to much as the cylinder and barrel are made of steel.
    In my experience the culprit for failure has been neglect, brought by the " cheap junk" label these guns undeservedly received. Mostly due to their inexpensive price tag and foreign manufacture in a time when American made usually and deservedly meant top quality.
    Because of the cheap price and cheap junk label, people didn't feel the need to care for them as they would a more expensive gun. And often relegated them to "tackle box" type status. Subjecting them to neglect that would damage ANY gun.
    On virtually all of the guns I repaired, the principle action needed was a good disassembled cleaning. With that alone being enough to repair many of them. They had simply grown so junked up internally that they could not function. Some needed minor small parts such as springs that had become corroded to the point of breakage.
    After repair, all became as reliable and accurate as any other (non adjustable sighted) SA revolver of any manufacture.
    In fact, the modern Heritage revolvers are direct descendents of these guns. I'm amazed in an age of plastic gun acceptance that so many still feel the need to dis these guns.
  11. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    The zinc is strong enough for the pressure, but it wears very quickly, causing the guns to loosen quickly..
    The zinc trigger guards on the double action guns are too thin and they break, keepin the trigger return spring from operating properly. I own one of these.
    While die cast zinc seems to be a great idea for guns, it really isn't. The only reason it is used is for ease of manufacturing, which keeps costs low. Durabilty was never a consideration.
  12. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Active Member

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    Fatsrat, I'm not surprised to hear that the Schmidt SAA-styled revolvers were better than than the type the original poster asked about. They were bulkier, which allowed for greater sturdiness of all parts, and had a simpler trigger mechanism. I'll bet they also sold for more money, allowing a bit more care in manufacturing. I'm glad to hear they weren't junk, because otherwise they might have discouraged quite a few people from the shooting hobby.
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2013
  13. Fatstrat

    Fatstrat Well-Known Member

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    A lot of people would be amazed at how many guns are made with zinc alloy today.
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