How do you practice?

Discussion in 'Self Defense Tactics & Weapons' started by TranterUK, Jan 6, 2009.

?

How do you mostly practice?

Poll closed Feb 6, 2009.
  1. Slow fire target shooting only

    6 vote(s)
    30.0%
  2. Rapid 'defensive' fire, no jacket

    5 vote(s)
    25.0%
  3. Rapid 'defensive' fire, inc, jacket

    9 vote(s)
    45.0%
  1. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Delta, the young Tranter is 13, he has a long way to go and much to learn.

    Knives can be interesting. Best folder I ever had was an original CQB7 made by Benchmade. They are made now by Emerson, the designer himself, but, at risk of making myself a target of assassins, not as well made.

    Fixed blade? I once bought a SoG Seal Pup and it just goes on and on. Solid as a rock.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 10, 2009
  2. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Benchmad, Emerson, and Strider I say are hard acts to follow. I know several guys that carry a CQB for a work knife, which says a lot. I've been happy with Gerber, having lost count of how many Gerber tools and knives, Leatherman too, I've been given by places I've worked. Most I gave away to young Soldiers who I noticed without a knife. Used to be, if a guy was working on our vehicles didn't have a multitool, I gave him mine because I've had so many always on hand and those boys really needed them more. I know the limitations/strengths of Gerber blades and for my purposes they were always enough, and had a feel good to my hand. If they are all made in China now though, I'll keep using the ones I have, but will not replace with the same.

    I just saw a while ago a SEAL-pup in AAFES clothing sales for $50. Not bad. SOG makes sturdy knives for a reasonable price. There's just no room for one next to my old KaBAR, which I've had since I was 18 when I couldn't afford an SOG or Randall. The faded black leather looks out of place with all the nylon around it these days. Right next to the SOG knives are new updated Kydex handle, D2 steel, nylon sheath KaBAR's. But my old 1095 carbon blade has opened a million meals, cut a million feet of cord, chopped saplings for sector stakes, opened boxes and crates, and once drank a hot cup of strong man's blood. Maybe I'll get a new KaBAR in my next life, or can hopefully afford a Randall at 18 yrs old. :D

    On the practice topic, I assume most self-defense minded people do this thing too; I once in a while draw my folder for practice. Try it in a seated position, in the car etc. I've always firgured you're more likely to need your knife to get out of trouble than your sidearm. (Cut your/someone's seatbelt, shatter a passenger window, etc)

    Tip for practice: Drawing a blade for a self-defense situation, develope the habit of protecting your head with weak-hand; tuck the chin while placing the weak-hand/forearm above and in front of the head, while keeping eyes on the threat and drawing the blade. It does no good to get the blade ready if you're knocked out or choked out first. Almost everyone I've seen practicing a draw (blade or gun) while under attack puts that weak-hand way to low...you must defend the head. One way to instill the lesson is practice presentation while a mate strikes you with a foam stick. Protect your head.

    About folders: With stabbing you should be taught to extract the blade from the enemy's/threat's body as fast as possible, for several reasons. One, when stabbing an enemy you can anticipate he will move in a drastic way, but not how much of what. Retention of the weapon hinges on you getting the blade out of him before he breaks your grip, as until the blade is out his grip is better than yours! All that twist pullout crap is asking to lose your weapon. Two, the wound can't bleed fast enough with your blade plugging it. Three, even more true of any folding knife due to lack of a tang, the longer the blade is in the enemy body the more likely it will break off in him. A folder is weakest in the middle.
  3. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Delta. You clearly have had advanced training in the use of a knife for defence. I would caution those without such knowledge to avoid this if at all possible. Without proper training they may just give their opponent the weapon they need.

    As I am sure you will agree just sticking a knife in is not nearly enough. I know people who took stab wounds and didn't even know about it until they saw blood, they thought they had been punched. There are both defensive and offensive things to know. I say best avoided if possible.
  4. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Sounds like they got hit by "stab 'n paray" :D Most people stab too early, rush to failure...takes 3 times the work for the same goal. About wounds, they are funny...my mate took pieces of a grenade in the hind end (purple heart, 3rd award) and thought his Camelback had busted when his pants felt wet. He was okay though. The doc took him behind a corner and they started wrapping his butt, but in the dark he was using his free hand to pull the guaze through his legs and the doc was snipping with scissors and cut the tip of my mate's finger off...seeing his finger pouring blood made him woozy...frag in the a$$ no problem; but a cut finger sent his knees wobbling.

    Some schools of thought says stabbing is a bad idea, nearly anything in the clothes may stop a stab, and slashing techniques are the only effective use of an edged weapon. Some say slashing is not effective enough, and leaves you open to getting struck down, but chopping a heavy knife is the way. Others say achieve a body clinch and stab for vital organs. Each side has very valid arguements. I believe the truth lives towards the middle.

    I agree about avoiding some things. Only a crazy fool, no matter how skilled, attempts too fight blade to blade if a choice is there. See, the other guy gets 50% suffrage about electing your fate! And true, the thing that makes a man with a knife so easy to disarm is most don't realize how easy a knife can be taken or turned. Legions of young men think turning their blade backwards with it running along their forearm is good for slashing and harder to snatch, but in fact such a grasp makes any strike fall into the perfect position for a foe to check and rotate the blade back into the owner. Your most common and best trained skilled knifemen are prison yard educated...that's exactly why you bring a gun to a knife fight too. :D

    But a blade never runs out of ammo or gets bad powder, and if a pocket pistol is more likely to always be on your person than a little folder is even that much more likely to always be with you. It's better than using your teeth, so I reckon some working bladecraft is good for any CCW citizen.

    And your hands...they're always within reach :D Sun Zu said, "A man who learns to fight without his sword is never without it."

    On shooting practice tips, the hardest bad habit to break for doing very close shooting is the urge to put the handgun out too far. Practice presenting the weapon in a draw that brings the handgun right up under the nose; eyes over the slide. Practice this and shooting one handed/two handed with the strong side elbow tight to the body, feet apart in a boxer stance, slight crouch...to absorb hits and stay up in the fight. With practicing presentation it's about economy of motion, getting the proper grip and sight picture with no wasted time.
  5. pricedo

    pricedo Member

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    I try to make my CCW practise sessions as close to reality as possible.

    When some perp is rushing you with a knife or a clubbing weapon you're not normally going to waste time taking your jacket off.

    In most CCW situations you'll have a sweater, jacket or coat on & might be facing several potential assailants armed in one way or the other.

    All the potential screw ups that could cost you your life in a real scenario come to light during real life, full dress practise sessions (ie. revolver handgrip or hammer catching on clothing, holster gun release problems) & allow you to remedy them when your life is not actually depending on a flawless & fast weapon presentation.

    I practise wearing each & every outer garment that I normally wear when I'm in the community so any unforseen problems come to light & can be remedied in advance.

    It is no time to be fumbling with a "hung up" handgun when your life (&/or your families) is on the line.

    CCW Permits: UT, PA, NH, ME
    Life Member: NRA, GOA
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2009
  6. 45nut

    45nut Active Member

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    delta13soultaker

    Will you be my Daddy.... or at least write a book? :eek::D

    Your posts are very informative without being preachy. I would think you would be a good teacher. I wish you well in the new year and may God keep you out of harm's way.
  7. poser_pilot

    poser_pilot New Member

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    +1. Although from your tone and some of your posts, I would be much surprised if you have not been an instructor in some school or other, as I get the feeling that you are likely a senior NCO, though there is the chance that you could be a very wise officer.
  8. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Thanks yall. Best wishes back at ya this new year, 45. Have been instructor, drill sergeant, and always a student, enroute now to another instructor job, this time to train the trainers somewhere warm. Senior NCO. Hoping to wear that retiree hat some day before I get too slow.
  9. 45nut

    45nut Active Member

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    Are you coming to Texas? :D
  10. redhart

    redhart New Member

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    I shoot IPSC competition, as well as praticing draw and fire at 7 and 10 yds. on single and multiple targets.Bullseye once a month at 20 yds.
  11. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

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    Nah, 45 but I used to live there man.
  12. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    The poll should have had a mixed vote as I expect many like me practice all of the above.
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