improving trigger pull on a Bond

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by dougw, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. dougw

    dougw New Member

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    Has anyone been successful lightening the trigger pull on a Bond Arms Derringer?

    The Manufacturer gives you this:
    How is the trigger pull?

    The trigger pull on our pistols is approximately between 6 and 7 1/2 pounds which is within the acceptable range for a pistol of this type. Derringers, being small compact pistols, require the user to operate the gun in a specific manner.

    1. With the hammer in the full cock position, grasp the grip with your shooting hand making sure that your hand is not touching the cocked hammer. Any amount of pressure applied to the cocked hammer by your hand will increase the trigger pull substantially.

    2. Make contact with the trigger using the pad of your trigger finger. Avoid pulling the trigger with the bend of your first knuckle.

    3. Pull the trigger back and downward.

    BUT the darned pull still is too stiff for me... ANy help?... Thanks Doug
     
  2. gunplumber

    gunplumber New Member

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    I would think there could be a problem with getting much quality help in this area due to the liability involved. These types of arms are considerably more dangerous to the owner than larger firearms due to the reduced size and ability to inadvertantly have the muzzle pointed in an unsafe direction. Add to this a light trigger pull and you have an accident on the horizon.....many makers make the pull such as yours for this reason.
     
    The_Rifleman likes this.

  3. Dutchboy

    Dutchboy Member

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    Try focusing on the "downward" part of Bond's "back and downward" advice. With a lot of these derringers, the trigger wants to move in a down and backwards direction because of where the trigger pivots. The don't move straight back like regular triggers.

    With a Cobra derringer, changing the direction that you pull the trigger to a downward and backward direction makes a big difference on the pull weight. I don't know about with a Bond. I've never been able to afford one!

    But, like Gunplumber said, these guns have stiff trigger pulls by design because they don't have trigger guards, and they often find themselves bouncing around in pockets with car keys, change, and assorted debris. (which is a bad idea, btw. Use a pocket holster, and don't put anything else in that pocket, even with a derringer.)

    I always thought that the Bond Derringers looked very well made. I hope that you can figure out a way to enjoy it. Good luck.
     
  4. deadin

    deadin Well-Known Member

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    Improving the trigger pull still won't make it into a target gun..:D;)
     
  5. dougw

    dougw New Member

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    Yep, they are a well made gun...they also have a trigger guard so the accidental 'hits' to the trigger are minimized.... I've practiced the downward/back pull extensively and have it down-pat...until I don't shoot it for a while and go to use it again and fall back into the regular trigger squeeze habit.....:mad:
    Thanks everyone for your coments.........
     
  6. wyoredot

    wyoredot New Member

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    I bought one of the Cobras for the lil woman annd she always thought it should shoot like a big pistol. After several attempts to keep it out of her purse and put it in the holster, I finally had enough and sold the gun. I think they have their place but that place is with one that pays attention. jmho.
     
  7. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    A note on some of those pistols: They usually have a lot of trigger/sear engagement because the half-cock notch is the ONLY thing that keeps the gun from firing if dropped on the hammer. So any work that thins parts or reduces that engagement can make the gun unsafe.

    Jim
     
  8. gunplumber

    gunplumber New Member

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    There is a metal treatment called Microlon that will help to some degree which is a liquid delivered teflon coating. You coat the parts with it and dry it with a hair dryer (easiest way) or a small propane torch (be careful not to overheat). I use about 4 applications per part. Once applied, the only way it can be removed is to grind it off or heat the part above 750 degrees. It gave me 90 fps more vel out of an old 22 bbl I tested it on and I use it alot on triggers. I get it from Brownells. I would caution against it's use if someone cuts, stones, grinds or in any way changes the angles of the hammer/sear engagement.
     
  9. bgtexas

    bgtexas New Member

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    I had the same problem with mine. At one point I was placing my index finger next to the barrel and using the middle finger to pull the trigger. Now I know what works best is to move your grip down until your index finger is inline with the trigger. Now you can pull down and back as recommended. I have the extended grip and my little finger goes under the grip.
     
  10. Rancid Loosehammer

    Rancid Loosehammer New Member

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    I just got my Bond 45 CA Papa Bear out of FFL "prison" this afternoon. When I tried the trigger pull at home with snap caps, it was horrendous. I could NO WAY drop the hammer and have the sights still on what I was aiming at. Then I remembered reading to use a back and DOWN pressure on the trigger. It takes some constipation (concentration), but I can do it without otherwise altering my grip ... and it does reduce the trigger pull by about 50%. I can now drop the hammer and still be on target dry firing. Need to practice doing it more, but the technique is there and it works. Actually, the only time I would actually use it would be punching paper @ 10 yards or maybe shooting a perp @ 10 yards or so. Probably 99% of the times I might actually have to use this thing would be very up close and personal, more like a few feet in which case trigger pull is N/A.

    But I got the CA Papa Bear specifically because it does NOT take 410 shotgun shells and is for 45 Colt only, and has a bit more rifling in the 3" barrel for better accuracy. You never know, might end up facing a random shooter in a restaurant or something. So I will practice with it until I can keep both barrels in the upper chest area @ 10 yards and centered at point of aim. From videos I have seen I know this is doable.

    BTW, I really love the derringer. It is a class A piece of work.
     
  11. crystalphoto

    crystalphoto Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Probably be a good idea to start another thread, as this one is over six years old... Welcome aboard!
     
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