In line vs traditional

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by Guest, Feb 23, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    WyomingSwede
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 618
    (12/8/02 9:27:59 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del All In line vs traditional
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    As a potential smoke pole convert (havent bought one yet but will in the new future...after getting advice from y'all), Can you give me the advantages and disadvantage of above??? I am hearing that pellets and sabots are the way to go and inline is much more reliable in that fasion. Also...any differences in kits vs off the shelf??? Thanks for the assist guys and "T". swede
    Wyoming Swede

    TallTLynn
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 5111
    (12/8/02 10:29:46 am)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: In line vs traditional
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    My 2cents worth and that's about all it's worth Swede are as follows.

    For real hunting - more the old fashioned way go with an original muzzle loader (or get really creative and go flintlock). It'll take practice to master it - but I've seem some guys and gals who could hit consistently at a decent distance.

    For sabots and pellets? (sorry never heard of pellets before) probably inline - you'll most likely get better accuracy but to me they just don't meet the criteria for being a muzzleloader. I've seen them and while neat looking just didn't impress me for a weapon - but then again you know the vast majority of my weapons are WWII or older.

    Smokin Guns
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 458
    (12/8/02 12:03:37 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Here's one...
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    But, Haven't received it yet...chosen over an in-line or a Flintlock, hope the link works (never tried posting a link before)...as always any opinion Pro or Con always welcome. I know absolutely less about muzzleloaders than I do Modern Rifles and Pistols. But always willing to learn.


    www.gunbroker.com/auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=6316093

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1554
    (12/9/02 6:41:09 pm)
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    Swede -

    Had a T/C Renegade for years - the percussion rifle that had a 1/48 twist to stabilize the conical bullets. It did quite well as long as the ol' peepers held out and I could see the iron sights. Once they became blurred, needed something with a scope on it, and the Renegade just didn't lend itself to a scope. Was mounted so far forward, the rifle was extremely muzzle heavy. Decided to go with an in-line I could mount the scope over the receiver area, like a regular bolt action.

    Got a T/C (yeah, I like their products!) Black Diamond. This rifle has a 1/28 twist to stabilize the saboted pistol slugs and will handle up to 150 gr black powder and can handle the shotgun 209 primer. WARNING - don't shoot 150 gr unless you've got a lot of recoil protection!

    Mounted an Redfield Widefield 1.75X6 scope on it. Loading 100 gr to 130 gr pyrodex pellets and the 209 primer, it does quite well with the saboted slugs.

    Cointoss2 just got a T/C Omega (I think that's what it's called) that has the trigger and breech cover that drops down with the trigger guard, which allows much more simplified cleaning and loading. Might check with him as to quality and general ease of handling.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"

    Edited by: kdub01 at: 12/11/02 4:59:34 pm

    astute observer
    Member
    Posts: 16
    (12/9/02 11:36:13 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Here's one...
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    The inline versus traditional argument can be about speed and reliability of ignition, but it cannot be about accuracy. Accuracy is determined by the quality of the barrel and the compatibility of the twist with the projectile you are trying to shoot through it. The barrel has no idea what type of action it is attached to! In other words, neither type is in any way superior to the other when it comes to accuracy, period.

    The straighter the pathway for the fire from the percussion cap to reach the powder charge...the better. Of course an inline is good in this respect, but certainly no better than an underhammer or a "mule ear" (sideslapper) or any other design in which the nipple is directly in contact with the powder charge. That does not mean that a gun using a drum or "snail" is inferior. I have several that I shoot regularly and I doubt you would find them any slower than a centerfire. Nor have I ever had a problem with misfires.

    warpig883
    *TFF Staff*
    Posts: 5438
    (12/10/02 2:02:59 am)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Here's one...
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    I am for the traditional way only. I do not think the inlines should be allowed for muzzle loader seasons


    But, having said that if I was going to go that route I would buy one of the Savage muzzle loaders that use smokeless powder.
    In 49 states ignorance is a crime. In the other one it is bliss.

    Zigzag2
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 4836
    (12/11/02 6:58:13 am)
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    Being, I'm from the "Not-so-old" school of shooting and had to have a percussion rifle for deer season, I bought the T/C Renegade in 50cal. I love that thing!
    The only problem now-a-days, is me ol eye sight



    Quote:
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    "Tell the gossipers and liars I will see them in the fire" - Johnny Cash, Let the train whistle blow
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    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1569
    (12/11/02 5:03:17 pm)
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    Yep, Ziggy -

    Sure did like my T/C Renegade, but as stated, the ol' peepers went for iron sights and needed something with a scope. I'd really like to be able to shoot the traditional bp's, but need a little assistance in the sights department. That's why the in-line. Puts the scope over the receiver just like a centerfire bolt action. Also, with the removable breech plug, a lot easier to clean. Never could get the plug out of the Renegade, even with the T/C breech plug wrench.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"

    Smokin Guns
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 471
    (12/11/02 5:59:40 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Came today...
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    ...For the one's of us that need a little extra glass...In my case cuz' i'm still in denial bout needin' glasses...



    JackRyann
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 71
    (12/14/02 8:25:13 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Came today...
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    What Warpig said.

    I wish they had those inlines and all that new crap shoved up.....

    Pyrodex is a solution for a problem that never existed.

    Pellets are those things that fall out of the stinky end of a deer.

    Those whopping monster ignition systems are to cure the ignorance of kids who want to hunt the primitive firearms season but don't want to learn to use or maintane the weapon.

    Give me a pound of FFF, a tin of #11 caps and couple pounds of lead and I'm set for several years.


    This whole rant is from a dumb old grouchy fart who can't seem to learn one simple rule. YOU CAN'T BRING ANYTHING HOME FROM WALMART WITH OUT OPENING IT IN THE PARKING LOT TO MAKE SURE IT IS WHAT YOU WANT AND EVERYTHING IS IN THERE THAT IS SUPPOSE TO BE.

    ---If you wouldn't take that shot with the LAST bullet in your gun, you don't have any business taking it with the FIRST.---

    Edited by: ruffitt at: 12/16/02 12:11:12 am
  2. ballcap

    ballcap New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
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    Location:
    campbellford ontario, canada
    dear smoken guns..For the many years I've used BP guns IE cap lock or Flintlock I have never had the need to remove the breech plug to clean my gun, warm water and soap will do the jog you need followed with sheath oil ..if cleaned properly gun will never rust . In Competitive shooting , passing a moistened cleaning patch preferably alcohol ..two strokes will do fine if done right you don't need to dry just load and shoot this maintains consistancy of fouling in your barrel and accuracy.
    Ballcap
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2009
  3. he-bear

    he-bear New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Messages:
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    It depends on what you want. if you want a more modern rifle then inlines are the way to go. If you want to feel what it was like to shoot and hunt "old school" then traditional is the way to go. I shoot traditional, percussion and flint lock rifles and pistols. My competition rifle is a T/C Hawken that I built from a kit when I was 16, I am in my 40's now and it is still going strong.
    It really depends on what you want and will shoot.
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