Is the Northeast THAT much more important than the rest of us?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Alpo, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Back in the late winter of 1993, I was sitting with my family, in Norfolk, watching the news about this big snowstorm in New York.

    They were calling it "The Blizzard of '93".

    Now, normally, when a name like that is used, it refers to something years in the past. The Great Drought of 1896. The Big Rain of 1947. The Blizzard of 2002. "Yeah, I was just a little shaver back then, but I remember The Blizzard of '93". That's something you might say now. But they were calling it that, while it was going on.

    Big hurricane. Camille. 1969. Category 5. Did nasty stuff to Alabama.

    Big hurricane. Hugo. 1989. Category 4. Did nasty stuff to South Carolina.

    Big hurricane. Andrew. 1992. Category 4. Almost washed Miami away.

    Big hurricane. Katrina. 2005. Category 5. Almost washed New Orleans away.



    All of those were big storms. Did lots of damage. But they are still just - hurricanes.

    Big hurricane. Sandy. 2012. Category 2.Hits New York. SUPER STORM SANDY.
  2. wv hillbilly

    wv hillbilly Active Member

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    i googled east coast states
    REST OF US?
    you claim to be from florida?
    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  3. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry, I don't understand your question, or statement, or whatever that was.

    Huge hurricanes have hit the South, through the years. They are just "hurricanes". But a smaller one hits New York and it's "A SUPERSTORM".

    What does "east coast states" have to do with "Northeast"? And, yes, the last time I looked, I live in Florida. I don't "claim" anything, I state, and I'm not "from Florida", I'm "in Florida".

    If you're confused by "the rest of us", that would be the part of the country that is NOT in New York/New Jersey. You know, the rest of us.
  4. gvw3

    gvw3 Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    This is because Mayor Bumberg lives there and all those fat cat wall street type's. They are much more important then the rest of us. :)
  5. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    Maybe they all were going to vote Democrat. That is probably what made them more important (in some folks mind).
  6. bamajoey

    bamajoey Active Member

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    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  7. Millwright

    Millwright Active Member

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    ALPO, You need to get out a little more.

    Sandy hit the "Northeast Corridor" ; that 100 mi. wide stretch of land between Washington, D. C. and Boston MA. Now you might not believe it but a significant portion of the nation's populace live there. Even more important, much of the nation's domestic and international finance - as well as a lot of technical, medical and physical research is conducted is in it. (You might have heard of that spot on an island in the Hudson where Dutch factors used to gather to swap lies and make deals on commodities and other financial prospects. ) It was characterized by a wall running the length of on one side of the street. Today we know it as Wall Street. You might also note that corridor is home to a great many refineries, several major seaports and rail termini that transport energy and goods to/from much of the nation. IOW, this area is the U.S. economic achillies' heel.

    Now look up a FERC report on the state of the nation's electric grid system and the NEC in particular. Due to population growth, its proximity to shore lines, the lack of grid redundancy, and the lack of grid infrastructure improvements - thanks in large part to "the environmental movement" working thru state and congressional venues largely prevented any hardening, but also prevented any pro-active efforts to remove the trees posing a threat to grid continuity.

    BTW, the NE Corridor got a reprieve as the "Halloween Storm" of 2011 repairs removed a lot of what would have been a catastrophic problem. Yes, ALPO, it is a "BFD":

    1. Because so many industries/jobs across the nation are effected.

    2. So many financial markets -here and abroad - were/are affected.

    3. NYC is still the "hub" for news and media and this story is on their front doorstep !

    4. Check out who owns the "Weather Channel" ! While there has long been a tendency for this channel to "overhype" weather events, I strongly suspect, due to the timing, a political motive as also at work.

    >MW
  8. red14

    red14 New Member

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    I am reminded of a qoute from 'The Yearling'.
    A rough translation: ''How serious something
    is, depends on whose Ox gets gored.''

    Superstorm indeed. For a Florida storm, it was a
    sissy.
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  9. wv hillbilly

    wv hillbilly Active Member

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    Wv. still has about 12,000 customers without power
  10. olafhardt

    olafhardt New Member

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    Used to live on the Gulf coast. When our power went out it wasn't cold.There was also a "noreaster" involved in the super storm. A lot of those folks are cold, hungry, homeless and broke and don't know when things will improve. I am sort of ashamed to be asscosiated with this kicking people who are down. To any body caught up in Sandy's aftermath my thoughts and prayers are with you.Note to moderaters: I really find this thread offensive.
  11. bamajoey

    bamajoey Active Member

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    When the power goes out after a hurricane that hits the Gulf coast the temp is usually in the high 90's. Try working 15-18 hours, come with no power, tired, hungry, temp in the house 95. Or even worse your home blown away, or washed away. I have been through it. I sucked it, up went to work, and did the best I could to get back to normal. I'm offended at these cry babies sitting on their cans with their hands out. After one of our worst hurricanes, it was 13 days before I saw my house in the daylight. I worked for a utility and couldn't be off.
  12. rosierita

    rosierita New Member

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    i was talking to a friend about this a couple days ago... when a hurricane hits here (or anywhere in the SE) people pitch in & help 1 another. the the NE, we're seeing a totally different "beast".
  13. bamajoey

    bamajoey Active Member

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    :thumbsup:
  14. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper Member

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    for me it is because my kids are there. i can hold my own, it's them i worry about
  15. 76Highboy

    76Highboy Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Well I know that Idaho is more important then Florida. :D
  16. 45nut

    45nut New Member

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    Ah Alpo, I love it when you start to spin webs of logic, it seems to confuse some though. :eek: :D :D

    And here comes millwright supporting the leftwing BS, again. To the rest of the country who are just a bit sick of being told how important this area / people are, we know they are suffering and aren't getting a good response from FEMA etc, but look at the folks in Joplin a couple years ago. Did they sit around complaining FEMA wasn't helping them? No, they rolled up their sleeves and helped themselves & their neighbors. Every year there are floods in the midwest and do you hear them complaining about the lack of federal response? No, because they already had supplies ready just for such an event.\ and did it themselves.

    It's called rugged individualism and it used to be an American tradition, now, not so much, at least not in the northeast and larger metro areas.

    Last year there was a pretty good sized tornado in my suburb, about 1/2 mile from my house. 90 houses damaged and unlivable. We didn't have one (1) case of looting or vandalism. In another suburb south of Dallas in a more ethnically blended neighborhood, looting and vandalism were rampant. It matters where you live as to the response you get to a disaster. Again, compare Katrina to any other hurricane in terms of violent crime, looting, etc afterwards. New Orleans Police joined looters carrying off jumbo TV's and worse yet, confiscated private citizens guns for their own use.

    It's the ones who can't / won't do ANYTHING for themselves except wait for their daddy, Obozo, to come rescue them. The difference between the makers and takers will become more evident in the next 2 years.

    Bloviation, look into it.
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  17. ponycar17

    ponycar17 Active Member

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    I also do not understand the hatred that some residents are showing toward the power company workers who are attempting to restore power. It makes me glad that I live in the Southeast, where all but the relocated yankees still have some sense of decency and respect toward those who are just trying to earn a living and help out.
  18. Gatofeo

    Gatofeo New Member

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    Yes, northeasterners are more important.
    Ask the folks in Oklahoma City who suffered a terrorist attack. They lost jobs, loved ones, children, property and peace of mind -- but the New Yorkers got far more assistance and money per capita than an Oklahoman.
    And if you doubt that the Oklahoma City attack was terrorism, then you need to look up the definition of Terrorist and Terrorism.
    I don't like to see anyone lose so much, in any part of the country, but the Twin Towers attack has held the lion's share of the limelight. The plane that crashed in Pennsylvania is running a poor second, and some people have forgotten that the Pentagon was attacked too.
    Unfortunately, New Yorkers are worth more than airline passengers, Pentagon workers and Oklahoma City residents. A lot more.
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