List of interchangeable Ammo

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by scvdog, Jun 4, 2011.

  1. scvdog

    scvdog New Member

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    I was wondering if anyone knew where I could find a chart or list of ammo that could be fired in a diffently chambered weapon (ie .38 spl in a 357 mag.)
  2. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    I have a wall chart I got when I was in smithin school. My new digital cam is supposed to be in in a few days so ill get a good macro pic and post it here and you can save it to your PC..

    But if theres something in particular you need right away you can just ask. I have most of the chart memorized..:)
  3. scvdog

    scvdog New Member

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    Thanks, I will be looking forward to it! I was really concered with the .45 cal. family ie .45 colt .45 long colt.45 auto. and am really interested in .45-70 government.
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2011
  4. quigleysharps4570

    quigleysharps4570 New Member

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    If I had to I'd shoot my 45-60 cartridges in my 45-70. Difference in the two is the .220 shorter case of the 45-60.
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    a . 45 colt chamber will only shoot .45 colt ammo. The .454 casull chamber can shoot the casull and the colt and the .460 S&W chamber can shoot all 3.

    A revolver chambered in .45ACP can shoot the acp and the .45 auto rim cartridge, the ACP uses a half or full moon clip to headspace. and the Auto rim has a .090" rim and looks like a short .45 Colt, But the Auto rim cannot be shot in a colt chamber due to the thick rim. .090 VS .060 of the colt.

    A .45/70 chamber will only shoot the .45/70, a .45/90 will shoot both, a .45/110 will shoot all 3, and a .45/120 will shoot all 4.

    Same exact thing applies to the .50/70, .50/90, .50/110 and .50/140 BP cartirdges.

    Boy I can keep goin, and its a pretty long list...

    Back on the .45/70 tho... This chambering comes in 3 progressively hotter flavors now days. Stage 1 is trapdoor springfield pressures which 90% of storebought ammo is loaded to, and also covers rolling blocks and sharps rifles. Stage 2 is levergun pressures like the BLR and the Marlin guide guns. these are hotter than normal and primarily used for hunting purposes. Stage 3 pressures is considered Ruger #1 and strong bolt actions ONLY. As these bad boys approach .458 win mag pressures. I have shot some of these level 3 loads and they HURT!
  6. BillM

    BillM Active Member

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  7. myfriendis410

    myfriendis410 Member

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    Actually; factory ammo is loaded to quite a bit over allowable pressures for a trapdoor springfield. The pressure delivered for factory ammo is around 29,000 psi whereas the trapdoor is somewhere around 21,000. So, really there are four power levels in the 45/70.
  8. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    good to know. The industry is like a little kid. it just wont stay put and is always getting into things..
  9. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    both the same cartridge. There never was a short colt in .45 and the .45 Colt was dubbed the .45 long colt because of its similar length to the .38 long colt.

    the .38 long colt does have a .38 short colt counterpart and both of those rounds can be fired in a .38 long colt chamber..
  10. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    http://www.leverguns.com/articles/taylor/45_short_colt.htm
  11. quigleysharps4570

    quigleysharps4570 New Member

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    Good read Alpo.
  12. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Cool beans. That is news to me. Thanks Alpo. Im sure glad that dog never ate you. You are time and again proving to be most useful..;)
  13. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    Always nice to be useful. :D
  14. Warith

    Warith Member

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    I always heard from my late great uncle (WW1 vet) that the colt 45s they shot in WW1 was shorter than the standard colt we shoot out of our colt 45s now. No one believed him (grandpa and (dad and uncle both WW2 vets)) now I can show my dad and uncle he was right, mind you they are both in their 80s now so will still believe he was blowing smoke at em not much is gona change their minds after 60 years of thinking it. But thanks for the link anyway Alpo.
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2011
  15. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about WW1, but around the turn of the century there was a 45 Colt round made by Frankford Arsenal, for use in the New Service 45 Colt. For the same reason it was never chambered in lever action rifle (the rim was too small for reliable extraction) the 45 Colt was not 100% in a revolver using an extractor star. "Not 100%" was unacceptable, so they had this special run of ammo made with larger rims. My understanding is the rims were so large they would not fit in a SAA. Cylinder is smaller in diameter than a New Service, so the rounds are closer together. Anyway, these "FA 45s" were also shorter than the standard service round for the SAA.

    I can think of a couple of reasons for this. The shorter brass would completely eject, while the longer might hang up slightly (the ejector stroke on the SAA is longer than the stoke on the New Service). And, when they first came out with the round, they loaded 40 grains of powder in the case. This proved to have too much recoil for most shooters, so they cut the load to 30 grains. Since black powder must be compressed, they had to put something in the case to take up the missing powder's space. Slightly shorter brass would remove the need for spacers/cardboard wads/what-have-you, between the powder and the bullet.

    So, Great Uncle might be remembering some FA 45s.
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