Lots of bullets to pull

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by johnsxdm, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. johnsxdm

    johnsxdm New Member

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    Learned the hard way today why you are supossed to make samples!! I got a new Loadmaster 2 weeks ago and got it all set up and dialed in and working like a clock, all thanks to the great vidieos on you-tube. So I set up and away I went. 100 rounds 115gn FMJ with Accu #7, 100 rounds with Ramshot Zip, 100 rounds 124gn FMJ with Accu #7, 100 rounds with Zip. Went to the range today with the wife and none of the loads were strong enough to eject. (OK,, 9 out of 10 would not eject) I guess I won't be using the "starting load" any more, maybe mid-range. I knew better about making so many,,its just was you get setup and going 100 rounds is nothing! Te day was not a total loss though,,,, I did bring 2 boxes of factory ammo just incase!
  2. garydude

    garydude Member

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    Welcome John!

    Been there and done that too! What I usually do is load maybe 5 at the starting load, then move up in increments to mid-range and load more there (30 or so, depends on the caliber). I fire the beginning rounds, look for signs of trouble, and go up from there. I haven't ever had problems with any rounds up to mid-range but I have had a few show problems not much more than that.

    Sounds like you did everything else right though. No failures to fire, failures to feed?
  3. johnsxdm

    johnsxdm New Member

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    I did have a few FTFires. I'm using Remington primers because everyone on the web seems to be out of stock on CCI. The few that did not fire were dimpled nice from the firing pin, I just reloaded them and they fired on the second go around. I had no issue with feeding into the chamber. I run all my finished rounds through a Lymann cartridge guage and visual inspection.
  4. garydude

    garydude Member

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    John I did not see what type of press you are using, but if it's single stage and you are priming on it I would strongly recommend that you get one of these. It will greatly reduce or eliminate your apparent priming issue.

    When primers are not seated deep enough the anvil and the cup will not meet with enough force to detonate the primer. With the first hammer strike on such a round you further "seat" the primer, and the second strike sets it off. Hand priming with the above device has been 100% perfect for me with over 10k rounds.

    FWIW, I too prefer CCI primers, but I have not had a performance issues with any other brand of primer.
  5. V509

    V509 Member

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    Crimped bullets are not fun to pull
    Some one sent me 500 222rem reloads. I do not shoot other's reloads so I proceeded to pull bullets with my kinetic puller.... that did not last long. I found a deal on a RCBS collet puller which I later replaced with a Hornady collet puller which is a bit easier because it is lever acutated.
    The collet pullers leave a mark on the bullet but I can see little difference in accuracy at 200 yards in my varmint rifles
  6. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    johnsxdm:

    Failures to fire can be one of several problems:

    1). Case length too short and whole cartridge seats too deeply in the chamber for the firing pin to adequately reach the primer.

    2). Over crimping such that the lip of the case is slipping past its ledge in the chamber. The firing pin power pushes the case farther into the chamber using part of its energy, with little left to set off the primer. Usually there is a light firing pin strike on the cartridge that did not fire.

    3). Primers not seated deeply enough into the primer pockets. They need to be below flush with the back of the case by a couple of thousandths. When the primers are too high, part of the energy of the firing pin is used up to fully seat the primer in the pocket.

    Since the press is new to you, you need to make sure the setup is right before you attempt to make amy more ammo on it and most certainly not in the quantities you did before.

    As for the brand of Primers, my supplier stocks Winchester. In a test in a magazine several years ago, they were the most energetic of the standard primers. I don't know the situation today but years ago CCI primers were made of extra thick materials and were not recommended for use on progressive reloading presses. Today some progressive reloader manufactures recommend a specific primer for use in their machine or nix certain brands. Read you instruction manual to see what primers are recommended or nixed.

    LDBennett
  7. johnsxdm

    johnsxdm New Member

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    Hi guys! Thanks for the replys. I spent the day in my shop with the games on the tube and my kinetic puller beating a 2" thick piece of oak. 9mm shells with a light crimp ( thank God) . Not hard to do, just boring after the first 50. LD, I think my main prolem with the FTFs was primers not fully seated, found a few that were a little high. And you are right, 10 or so samples of each on the next go around.
  8. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    johnsxdm:

    While it may seem destructive, the only way I can get the kinetic bullet puller to work well is to beat it on a concrete floor. Bench tops just don't do it. My current one is over 15 years olds and is still intact.

    Also forego cleaning it with a aerosol spray can cleaner. The gas escapes very cold and will shatter the plastic of the puller. (Don't ask how I know that one!).

    Some presses that install primers don't get the adjustment right and don't seat the primers fully. Some don't even have an adjustment. Military brass uses a crimp to assure positive retention of the primer. Unless you remove that crimp after de-priming, presses will have a hard time fully seating the primers into their pockets. Some claim the problem is residue in the primer pockets but in 25+ years of reloading pistol cartridges I have never cleaned the primer pockets of any of my pistol cartridges before reloading them and have had zero problems with full seating the primers. Some of these cases have been reloaded more that 10 times. If the press consistently fails to seat the primer below flush then you will have to evaluate your handle operating procedure and/or adjust the primer seater assembly of the press.

    LDBennett
  9. Clipper

    Clipper Member

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    I'm with LD! I broke the handle on my RCBS Kinetic puller bashing the tool bench, switched to the 1/2" steel plate my Rockchucker is mounted on and never have any more problems. I also hand prime everything, using both the Lee Hand Prime and the RCBS hand primer. Don't have any problems with primer pockets and the primers seat properly.

    Yes it does slow things down, but I consider reloading my therapy, not work. Being retired does have some perks.
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