M1 Garand rebuild

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by Ionredline 06, Aug 20, 2006.

  1. Ionredline 06

    Ionredline 06 New Member

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    I bought an M1 Garand in functioning condition ..... actually traded plus cash on an SKB o/u 12 ga. I was ignorant of the qualities of a good M1 until I bought some books and did research and found out it was a bastardized rebuild. SN 3427446. I replaced all wood with walnut with proper cartouche markings, gas lock, op rod, bolt, rear sight, trigger group. All parts are now correct for a Dec. '44 M1 except the barrel, which is a Nov '50 replacement (probably from the arsenal). TE and ME are around 3 and the finish varies (due to parts replacement) but is mostly over 90%. I've had one offer for $1200 but I'm not willing to part with it. I suspect better payoffs than that, but can anyone give me a good estimate?
  2. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Minn-eeee-sota, ya, sure, you bet!
    Hi Ionredline.....welcome to TFF.

    The good news.....you've got a piece of history, a fine shooting rifle, and "The finest battle implement ever produced", accord to Gen. George S. Patton.

    The bad news.....maybe you should've taken the $1200.

    Accrding to The Standard Catalog of Military Firearms:

    Rebuilt Rifle, any manufacture

    Value shown is for rifles with a majority of its parts mixed/replaced......valued mainly for shooting merits. Bore Condition, gauging and overall appearance are important factors.

    Exc. - $725
    V.G. - $550
    Good - $425

    Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings.
  3. Pomy11

    Pomy11 New Member

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    Ion, did you purchase from CMP (Civilian Marksmanship Program) I was told that almost all of the Garands are "bastardized" the government basically took the rifles apart, keep spec pieces and threw out the worn, and at the other end of the line, reassembled them as the parts came down the line, that's why exact matching Garands are so expensive and so many are made of other parts, I have a 1942, with Springfield 780XXX low serial number. And I had the good fortune to get an International Harvester from the 1950's, the most accurate Garand made, I have been told, and can verifyfor me.
    You may get more than the $1200 some day, remember they produced Millions and millions of these.

    Goggle the CMP, for more info. My source is an expert on Garands named Glenn Kestler, Cinn. Ohio
  4. LIKTOSHOOT

    LIKTOSHOOT Advanced Senior Member

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    First off, I doubt you are the first or last to be had concerning Garands. As a matter of fact, some are passed many times before someone in the know tells the owner the truth-brutal as it may be. X has pretty much nailed it, it is a shooter, so enjoy what you have built.


    LTS
  5. Xracer

    Xracer *TFF Admin Staff Mediator*

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    Let me tell you a little story (true), that might one explain one reason why original, all-matching Garands are so rare.

    In 1955 I went thru Navy Boot Camp at Bainbrige, MD. In our third or 4th week, we had what was called "Service Week".....basically a break in training during which we performed KP. Luckily, I ducked peeling potatos, "pearl diving", and policing cigarette butts.....I was assigned to the Rifle Range to clean rifles from yesterday's "qualifications".

    We carried Springfield '03 A3's....we marched with them, and performed the "Manual of Arms" with them......but we had to "Qualify" with the M1 (aim downrange and pray). Usually two Boot Companies qualifed per day. Natururally, these rifles had to be cleaned.

    We'd show up at 0-dark-hundred and there were several wooden benches, two 55 gallon barrels filled with GI bore cleaner (with gas rings under them so that the cleaner was boiling......a dozen or so wire baskets with wires attached to them, plus various cleaning tools, a big bottle of compressed air, etc., etc., etc.......and 120 M1's (of varying manufacture) in need of cleaning.

    We'd disassemble the M1's.....barrels & receivers went into one barrel, and the other parts went into baskets with similar parts which were immersed in the other barrel.

    After 5 to 10 minutes we'd pull a dozen M1 reeiver/barrels.....run a bore bush down the barrel, then dry patches until the bore was dry. We'd then use the compressed air to blow dry the receivers......and continued until all of the recievers/barrels were clean & dry.

    Then we'd start on the baskets.....hit 'em with compressed air, dump 'em out on a towel and hit 'em with air again.....until all of the parts were clean & dry.

    We'd then lube them and reassemble the rifle without regard to which parts came from which rifle.

    As the Gunner's Mate said, "C'mon, C'mon.....all the parts fit all the rifles....you're eating into my coffee break!"

    Gentlemen.....if any of those M1's contained one part with which it left the factory.....it was sheer coincidence!
  6. southernshooter

    southernshooter New Member

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    The M1's are great shooters and not a bad hunter either. So enjoy it no matter how original or not it is.
  7. Silver72

    Silver72 New Member

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    There's a military surplus parts and gun dealer at all the shows in this area. He always has at least two "all original M1 garands" on his table. He buys as many from CMP as he can, disassembles them, checks the drawing numbers and reassembles them into "all original as left the factory" guns. Some people pay his outrageous price for his time to do this. One born every minute!
  8. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    While Garands have zero chance of every being truly "original" (see above) some collectors like their guns to represent how the rifle may have been as it left the factory. There are many variations of many M1 parts and getting to the "correct" configuration is important to some and it allows collectors to have something to do at gun show (search out elusive M1 parts and pieces). If someone has done the work to get his gun all "correct" more power to him and if someone else wants to pay him for his work that's great for him. But If you want a shooter and not a wall hanger buy any Garand, make it safe for shooting, and go at it, shooting that is.

    I have two Garands: one whose receiver was made in the last month of WWII and a new receiver filled with Beretta manufactured parts from post WWII. The former has a heavy barrel and a few Match parts I picked up at gun shows along with a B-Square scope mount and a 3x9 scope. The other M1 has a new laminated stock and was all freshly re-finished by the re-manufacturer. It is a good looking gun! The new receiver Garand out shoots the scoped orignial receiver gun. I love shooting them and see no reason for selected parts to make them "original" but that's just me. There are collectors out there who just want to own "original" configuration guns and never shoot them. To each his own. Neither I or the collector is a "fool". Each of us just knows what turns himself on.

    LDBennett
  9. Silver72

    Silver72 New Member

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    I certainly see your point and agree. I wasn't referring to the seasoned collector, or dedicated shooter of surplus military weapons. You have experience that the novice gun show guy doesn't. He doesn't know much, if anything, about garands, but sees the one on the table and in the end the seller has convinced him it is one in a million that made it through the maze of various use scenario's in the passed decades. The novice shells out more money than you or I would. He may be happy for the rest of his life, or at some point realize what he has and be disappointed.

    I collect the old WWI and II .45 guns and have one for a display that was a restoration by Bill Adair. It is a prime example of what one looked like as it came from the factory early last century. It was crap when I acquired it in a trade. It would not fool a collector but looks good in it's shadow box display.
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