Magnum Primer 30-06 Reloads

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by trapnbow, Sep 29, 2009.

  1. trapnbow

    trapnbow Member

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    Gentlemen,

    Have any of you had any experience or do you have any recipes for 30-06 loads using magnum primers. I have tried a variety of powders but have yet to achieve near factory velocities with Hornady SST's in 150, 165, and 180 grain bullets. The reloading guru at one of the local firearm shops suggested the magnum primers and told me that some bench rest shooters use them all the time. Any information would be appreciated.

    Powders used to date are Varget, H4350, IMR4350 and I usually use CCI large rifle primers. All my cases for this experiment are new Remington manufacture.
  2. KellyTTE

    KellyTTE New Member

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    More than you ever wanted to know about magnum primers.

    http://www.jamescalhoon.com/primers_and_pressure.php

    To be honest, I'm coming to the conclusion that magnum primers in rifle reloading have the same brisance as their 'normal' counterparts, but the cup/wall thickness is where the main difference resides. My loads with magnum primers have behaved and chrono'd the exact same as my normal primered loads have.
  3. Rocket J Squirl

    Rocket J Squirl New Member

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    Ive used IMR 4350 and Federal match primers in my bolt gun for years.
    Last year I ran low, and subbed some others. Lost FPS and my group grew.

    Im back using Federal match, and switched to H4350, Im back to sub MOA at 200 yards. Cutting the same holes.

    I jsut picked up some Remmington 9 1/2 largre rifle primers that are hotter and non-magnum. Im out to test those in the coming weeks
  4. trapnbow

    trapnbow Member

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    Gentlemen,

    Thank you both for your prompt replies. I was told that perhaps I should back off the load 10% if I used a magnum primer and then to work back up. I may try that with a few rounds just to get a base line. I wonder if the bench rest shooters use them because they get better shot consistency. There must be a good reason. Are there any bench rest shooters out there with the answer. Also do you back off the load when using magnum primers? Recipes please. LOL:rolleyes:
  5. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    I was just wondering if you have chronographed your factory loads to your reloads. That way your not just taking factory published velocities at their word. They do have a tendency to exgaggerate.
  6. Rocket J Squirl

    Rocket J Squirl New Member

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    Factory specs would depend on the testbed firearm they used to preform the numbers with.

    Each firearm is going to be different.
  7. firewrench044

    firewrench044 New Member

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    I started useing magnum primers for M1 Garands ( CCI # 34 ) to help avoid slam fires,
    found a sweet spot for 155 gr Sierra Palma, this sweet spot is also good for 1903
    Springfield and a sporterised Mauser ( all 30-06 )
    all have 1/10 twist, 24 inch barrels
    Did not try to match a factory load, I looked for a sweet spot
    this is apr. an 80% fill in the case, and found that standard and bench rest primers
    gave me some slow fires and magnum primers ( CCI # 34 ) eliminated the problem

    155 gr Sierra Palma
    CCI # 34 primer ( add 0.3 gr powder with standard primer )
    LC case ( add 0.5 to 1.5 gr with comercial case ( it varies with case volume ))
    45.7 gr IMR 4895
    COAL 3.320

    Haveing CCI # 34s on hand I worked up loads for the rest of my calibers
    308, 7.62X54R, 7.92X57, 6.5X55
    was able to center up in the sweet spots with a reduction powder of 0.2 to 0.3 gr
    useing the same powder with magnum and standard primers
    308 no reduction in patern be tween types of primer (Varget )
    7.62X54R 1 1/2 inch reduction in patern at 200 yards ( IMR 4350 )with CCI # 34
    7.92X57 no reduction in patern (IMR 4064 )
    6.5X55 has such a small patern with both types of primers at 200 yards that I
    can only say there are fewer fliers with the CCI # 34 ( most holes touching )
    ( IMR 4350 )

    My conclusion -- helps with some and is the same with others
    CCI # 34 is the only LR primer I use and have in stock now
  8. trapnbow

    trapnbow Member

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    Gentlemen,

    Thanks for all the good information. I have not chronographed many factory loads because I don't have many available. I use Hornaday bullets for my hunting loads and was trying to get close to the Hornaday Light Magnum published specifications. I might buy a box of 30-06 light magnums and run a few through the chrono to get a base line. That will certainly normalize the rifle and chronograph from the variables.

    Thanks,
  9. Cpt. Coughtry

    Cpt. Coughtry New Member

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    First of All I shoot bench at +800yards with a 30-06spring. Second of all !!!STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING!!! If you want to try something new that is not published chances are you're eventually going to kill your self with out the right equipment. 30-06 is rated for 50K CUP or about 60K psi. Just because your velocity is under what manufactures rate there ammo at does not mean your load not going to blow up in your face and kill you. I've seen a bolt hanging out the back of some guys skull because he didn't know what he was doing when he handloaded his own ammo.

    Reloading can be very rewarding and done safely, but you need to know more then reading recipes and working the equipment. Get a Lyman reloading manual to start. Not all guns like the same primer. My Rem 700 happens to like Winchester. I use IMR 4895 with the WLR (regular) primer and working up a new load using IMR 4350 with the WLRM (Mag). Magnum primers not only burn hotter, but longer. The caps are normally the same. Pressure sensitive primers are used in semi autos and those have a bit thicker cap. Normally you don't use Mag primers unless you're using a ball powder, very long barrel, and over 95% cartridge load (known as a compressed load). Not all brands of primers put out the same. CCI run cold compared to Winchester. So CCI will require a little more powder then Winchester to get the same pressure. Long barrels (26-42 inches NOT A TYPE (check out the 20mm sniper rifle)) require a longer burn. There for you need a longer burning primer and to go with that you will need a longer burning powder and usually more of it.


    !!!This load is only an example designed for my rifle. Your gun may not handle this load so consult a reload manual!!!
    Now in our case loading for the 30-06 with the 168gr BTHP this bullet fly's best at 4000fps. Not chance we will get this velocity with out a +32 inche barrel. To get the best performance of a standard 24" barrel we normally will use a mid rang burn powder (burns up in about the first 1/3 of barrel) with a regular primer. Now that we are talking about long range bench shooting we need to make up for that loss of compression as the bullet travels down the barrel by using a slow burning powder with a longer burning primer to keep it going. This will help us establish the best performance of our barrels. The down side about the 30-06 is the small cartridge size. This is why most comp shooter use at least a 300 WM and even a 300 RUM in the .308 cal. You don't get much improvement with the 30 cal once you are looking at a 30-06. If you want more your next step is going to be the 338 lapua (2000 yard range). Now we only want to use 80-95% of the available space in the cartridge. Since 4350 at 59 grains with a regular primer is a compressed load you are at 100% depending on you bullet seat depth. I can actually use 59.2 gr based on my bullet seat because I don't seat as deep due to my chamber. To reduce the powder to make space available for best ignition we use a magnum primer to make up for the loss of charge. Since they say on AVERAGE you get a 10% charge increase I'll drop down to 75% on my minimum charge giving me 41.25gr that puts my cartridge at 69% full. I'll work up from there until I've reached 10% under 59gr totaling 53.1grains of powder(IMR 4350)MAX load and this puts my cartridge at 89.7% full (with in the limits we are wanting). I'm going to load a box of 50 with increments of five rounds, inching my way up from 41.25gr and work my way up to 53.1gr. Keep in mind you need to take up that dead space using polyfil that you can get from Wal-Mart in there fabrics department. Make sure you weigh each fill that they are all exactly the same for each sets of charge. Once you are in the 80% full you won't need the polyfill.

    Take a look at your load data. Each maximum of different powders give a different velocity. This is why you can not go off of velocity to get an idea of how much powder to use. If you want to get real technical about it get a universal chamber with a 30-06 test barrel and all the computer hook up's to test your ammo working up from the minimums until you reach the 50K cup or 60K psi. As you range test your ammo with out this equipment check each brass of every load just after you fire for distortions, ect. Check your primer pocket and make sure the primer doesn't fall out. Mark each brass with a sharpie pen what was loaded in it. So when you re-prime that brass you can see if the primer falls out. If the primer doesn't hold in then you've reached 120% of the safety limit of that brass and you need to back off with your charge.

    Remember Just because you can fill up the brass doesn't mean the gun can handle the load. It also doesn't mean that powder will be put to good use or just blown out of your barrel unburned. With some and most bullet faster is not always better. Slow velocity high energy is great for big game. Bullets start to wobble when they've exceeded there designed velocity based on your barrel length and twist. This reduces your chances of hitting your target little alone hitting your mark. This is why us comp guys use longer barrels so we can establish that high velocity giving us a flat trajectory, but enough spin on the bullet to maintain it's stability.

    Keep in mind that reloading is a science. Any changes will give you a different result. If you want faster with out blowing your gun up then use a slow burning powder and a Mag primer with the right charge. Keep in mind that if the powder is too slow then you've only wasted powder. The only way to fix this is to lower the charge or get a longer barrel. You also need to remember that heavier bullets need less powder since they take longer to build up speed. If the pressure can not be equalized fast enough due to too hot of a load using a heavier bullet your gun WILL blow up.

    I hope this was useful and not too late.
    CPt. Coughtry out
  10. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    I use them with great success and accuracy. Just to be safe when working up a load, reduce the max data for a std primer by another 6% for magnum primers, then if you have safely wrked up to the new max without pressure problems, tread carefully to the std max... I almost always fint the best accuracy about midway to 3/4 of the way through the load data during the development..
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