Measuring Length of Pull

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by CountryGunsmith, Feb 23, 2003.

  1. CountryGunsmith

    CountryGunsmith New Member

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    (7/30/01 11:21:37 am)
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    ezSupporter
    Length of Pull?
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    There are many explanations regarding the "Length of Pull" on rifles and shotguns, etc.
    Is there a scientific method that applies? How do gunsmiths measure for this type of specification and apply it to each individuals needs?
    Charlie D
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    Is there reference material available?
    Thanks.

    kdubaz
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    (7/30/01 12:31:04 pm)
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    Stockmakers, especially those fitting shotgun stocks have "try" stocks that are adjustable for all sorts of things including length of pull, cast-off, comb height, drop, etc.

    Length of pull is that distance from trigger to end of stock butt. Most generally, rifle and shotgun stocks are provided with 13 3/4" from the factory, as this is felt to be the average length of the average adult male's requirement for comfortable grasp of the firearm and for trigger manipulation.

    This probably works for 80% of the shooting adult male population. Youths, women and the other 20% of the male population require something else - more or less (pun intended!). This is where a custom stock maker can tailor a stock specifically for your personal fit. A non-fitting stock is uncomfortable, ungainly, and can knock your socks off with recoil of heavy caliber firearms. One of the most common mis-fits is the height of comb. If a firearm comes with iron sights, the stock height is normally regulated for a good stock weld (firm cheek contact with stock) while sighting with the provided sights. Mount a scope will alter the sight level causing the stock weld to become less firm. Put high or X-high rings on to compensate for large belled scopes of high magnification and the weld becomes nonexistant. This causes poor sighting and erratic grouping - a fault of neither the rifle or scope - just poor sight alignment.

    An overly long or a too short length of pull causes poor trigger control and difficulty in properly mounting the firearm to the shoulder quickly - very important to shotgunners, especially!
    Keep below the ridgeline!

    AntiqueDr
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    (7/30/01 12:48:48 pm)
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    Excellent explanation Kdub!

    I'd just add that an improper length of pull compounded by an inappropriate scope mount can lead to interesting supraorbital scar tissue!


    We Buy Guns! 1 - 100, Antique or Modern!
    www.apaxenterprises.com

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    (7/30/01 1:34:22 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Length of Pull?
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    Thanks guys....I appreciate your response.
    I will probably go to my gunsmith and get measured etc.
    I have a shotgun that really beats me up....

    But, orbital scar tissue???
    AD...is that the same as:
    What do you see on your windshield when struck by misquitoes?
    A very pointed rectal definitional display! (Intermitent locations)
    Didja flinch?

    kdubaz
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    (7/30/01 4:44:02 pm)
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    No, DN -

    It means that nice semi-circular cut that gets engraved into your forehead and eyebrow when the ocular portion of the scope comes back in recoil (due to poor stock fit, or "stock crawling", i.e., you put your stupid face too close to the scope and not holding stock properly, or stock is too short) and smashes into your tender puss, leaving blood running into your eyes and all the guys on the firing line snickering at your!!
    Keep below the ridgeline!

    Different name
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    (7/30/01 9:48:20 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Length of Pull?
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    Yer Right! Those late pulls from the 25 yard line can sure mess up a ugly man in no time....a release trigger doesn't help a bit.

    The shotgun I was talking about is a Browning 12 ga 30" double automatic class of 55 I think. I been keepin B Positive in my shooting bag.....
    Charlie D
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    rayra
    Member
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    (7/30/01 11:41:48 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Length of Pull?
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    another way to get 'the scar' quickly is to shoot someone's 'pet' .50cal, which they lovingly placed atop a horse blanket to keep the bipod pristine.
    I was so worried about recoil & stock / shoulder weld that I did nothing to support the rest of my seated body, or the piece.
    Sighted, squeezed the trigger, somebody's horse kicked me in the head.
    If not for my shooting glasses, woulda scraped my whole eyebrow off.
    As it was, earpieces flew off the polycarbonate lens, and I got barely a nick, but, man, do headwounds bleed.


    on-topic - is there some formula or rule of thumb for proper length of pull - length of your forearm or some such?

    rich

    kdubaz
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    Posts: 419
    (7/31/01 12:06:46 am)
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    Yup, a hairlipped eyebrow will ruin a good day for anyone!

    The "rule of thumb" for length of pull is to place the rifle/shotgun on your shooting forearm (arm extended with palm up), place the finger on the trigger and see if the butt snuggles against the upright portion of the upper arm just above the elbow. The butt should lay in the crook of the arm just touching the upper arm. This is considered your personal "length of pull". Otherwise, have the local friendly stockmaker measure it with a try-stock. For shotgunners, a custom stock can work wonders, as the stockmaker can personalize the amount of "cast-off", height of comb and drop of heel needed to attain perfect sight alignment down the barrels for point-and-shoot capabilities.
    Keep below the ridgeline!
  2. quartermiler660

    quartermiler660 New Member

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    Many thanks to those of you who offered some explanation of the term LOP.
    I've noticed that I'm having difficulty mounting my shotgun to my shoulder while wearing heavier clothing in winter. Now I'm looking for a shorter stock. I'll do my best to avoid the 'kissed' eyebrow scar, as I'm fixin' to install a red dot sight.
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