might be a problem

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by chunk2t1, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. chunk2t1

    chunk2t1 New Member

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    im loading for my 45 colt and i think i have a problem. i was loading cowboy loads with 6.4 grains of hodgen universal powder, and a 200 grain lead bullet. after firing the test loads it seems i have un-burnt powder left in the casing, and it seems my revolver is not cycling the way it should be. is the un-burnt powder a normal thing or should i look into a different powder?
  2. ryan42

    ryan42 New Member

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    I only load 45 acp and use hodgdon tightgroup and I dont have any powder left so i dont think you should.Someone that knows more than me will be along shortly to anwer your question.There are alot of experienced people on here that wont mind helping you.Welcome to the forum
  3. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    I don't quite understand about the revolver not cycling properly. Can you explain a little more.
  4. chunk2t1

    chunk2t1 New Member

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    well when i pull back on the hammer the cylinder tends to jam up
  5. BDJ

    BDJ Member

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    Do your bullets hit the barrel as the cylinder moves past it?
    You have a good crimp? Bullets moving out of the casing as you shoot?
    O.A.L.?
  6. Bigr Bang Thry

    Bigr Bang Thry Member

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    Does the cylinder jam because the bullets in the remaining cartridges have creeped forward ? That is a problem caused by a lack of crimp. The recoil makes the bullet move inside the brass, and the cylinder doesn't have enough clearance to allow it to complete the cycle. Make sure that your COL is correct, and adjust your crimp die a little tighter. That should alleviate that problem. As for the unburnt powder, it is possible that a heavier crimp will help with that as well. By crimping the bullet a bit more, the pressure inside the cartridge has a bit more time to rise properly, and therefore burn all the propellent. Also, double check your primer. It could be that you put a large rifle primer into the brass instead of a large pistol primer. Pistol primers tend to have a hotter kernel of flame, even though the kernel doesn't last as long. Try again, and let us know what happens.
  7. Bigr Bang Thry

    Bigr Bang Thry Member

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    - BDJ;

    You must have been responding while I was typing.... I type slow!
  8. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    I've heard of universal being a bit as you described, some residue if it is not used at higher pressures due to improper crimp or light charge, h110 acts this way as well.
    It should be priority to understand why you cylinder is not timing properly, most of the previous posters have covered that, be careful!
  9. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Standard load level ammo in 45 Colt tends to not expand the case enough to act as a good seal during firing. Light loads would be even worse. The result is that you get powder burns on the brass starting at the case mouth and continuing to as far back as half the way to the case head. Some of the higher pressure loads minimize this effect. It is not bad in and of itself but just note worthy. A tight crimp helps to hold the bullet longer allowing the pressure to get higher before the bullet starts to move which helps with this problem and perhaps with the unburned powder problem. While Cowboy shooters often download this cartridge, unless you are shooting for that contest it is better to shoot standard loads.

    Your load, according to Hodgdon Load Center, is a starting load. The upper limit is 8.8 grains. I think you should be loading closer to the max or at least half way to the max and you should increase the crimp. It is better to separate the seating process from the crimping process. A good crimp only die might help too. But do not crimp so hard that you expand the case neck such that the cases will not fit in the revolver's cylinders.

    LDBennett
  10. chunk2t1

    chunk2t1 New Member

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    thanks for all the help. it turns out to be a case of inexperiance. i had a freind show me hot to do this when i started and he explained the bullet seating die also crimped. i thought it was automatic, when i called him and asked how to adjust the crimp and explained why he told me not to touch anything he would show me. turns out i was not crimping the cases at all. now thanks to every one im less likely to blow myself up.
  11. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    chunk2t1:

    Here's the procedure I use for setting the seating and crimping die:

    First I screw the seating plug all the way in so that the bullet can be seated incrementally to the right place (the crimp groove without crimping the case) with short strokes of the ram. I then have a perfectly seated bullet in a case to use a gage, but not crimped. I then remove the seating plug altogether and incrementally screw down the seating die until the case starts to become crimped. I then incrementally screw the die body down until I get the right amount of crimping. If I go too far it may crumple the body of the case. i then use the die body lock nut to lock down the die body. I put the "gage" case in the shell holder, raise the ram until the gas gets crimped. Leaving the ram fully up, I screw in the seating plug until it touches the seated bullet of the gage cartridge and clamp the seating plug down. I then use another case and seat a bullet in it and crimp it all in one motion of the ram. I inspect the results and make any small adjustment for seating. When I have a good cartridge with the bullet seated properly and the case crimped well, I pronounce the die set up and continue on with the rest of the lot.

    What I have learned all along is that I must go through these steps every time I set up the press for seating/crimping. And I relearned that just today when I tried to return to the setting last used only to crumple a coupe of cases.

    LDBennett
  12. JohnTheCalifornian

    JohnTheCalifornian Member

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    That unburnt powder may be the cause of the cycling issues you are experiencing too. It may be getting caught up somwhere causing a bind.

    It's worth a lookk too.
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