NAA Mini 22 Magnum With Swing-out Cylinder

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by flyingtiger85, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. flyingtiger85

    flyingtiger85 Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,220
    Location:
    Nevada
    [​IMG]

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    They say it will be available soon in 22 magnum and later in 22 lr.I think the 22lr would be more fun.If they are plentiful later this year I'll try to get one.The top break model went fast and then the prices went through the roof.I posted on the NAA 1860 Sheriff when it came out and bought one later in the year.I think new gun models in 22 rimfire are interesting and worth a post."22,still the worlds most popular cartridge".
  2. Nerostarr

    Nerostarr New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    I'd like to have one of those in a 22lr, it a very nice looking piece. Don't know what I would use it for, except a little pocket gun. But I've always wanted one and looked at them often when at the LGS.
  3. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2011
    Messages:
    957
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    I wonder why they made it swing out to the right?
  4. pickenup

    pickenup Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2002
    Messages:
    6,858
    Location:
    Colorado Rocky Mountains
    ^^^^This^^^^
    Probably for left handed people.
    I'll wait until they make one for right handed people. :D
  5. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    17,607
    Location:
    Australia
    801-374-9990 ask for Sandy

    ask him ;)
  6. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    5,968
    Location:
    Ohio NRA Member
    I was wondering the same thing, why it swings out to the right. But IMO, if your right
    handed, it's easier to load with the right hand.
  7. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    10,594
    Location:
    NW Florida
    For the same reason that single actions load on the right side. It is easier for the 80% of the population that is right handed to hold the big gun in the clumsy left hand and feed the small cartridges with the dextrous right hand than it is to do it the other way around.
  8. old semperfi

    old semperfi New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,514
    Location:
    i live in southern indiana,old country boy at hear
    i have carried one of these pistols as a shorts gun or just stuck it in my top pocket when needing a hide out gun for years and years.i assure you i will buy one and retire the one i have,any gun is better than no gun.it comes in handy when you are in company that dont beleive in concealed carry.they never know. old semperfi
  9. 3/2 STA SS

    3/2 STA SS Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,579
    Location:
    Tampa Bay Area, FL
    I love the swing out model and may have to get another now...thanks NAA for making life harder.
  10. heyjoe

    heyjoe New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    it swings out to the right so that the basic design of the mini revolver they currently make already would not have to be changed. im looking forward to getting one.
  11. red14

    red14 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    3,936
    Location:
    N FLA
    It has those nice sights too. :cool: Another 'homerun' for NAA.;)
  12. Lanrezac

    Lanrezac Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2011
    Messages:
    957
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    Well, the French agreed with you back in the 1890's when they designed their 8mm service revolver...but pretty much no one else has, before or since. I wonder why? It does seem odd that loading gates are almost invariably on the right, while cylinders almost always swing out to the left.

    My guess is that loading a right-side-opening cylinder would involve switching the gun from the right hand to the left, then switching it back again to resume firing, and that is something people prefer not to have to do under stress. Too much chance of dropping the gun in the process, I would think.

    On the other hand (so to speak) using a loading gate requires holding the gun with the loading gate side up. Most right-handed people find it easier to hold the gun with the right side up, I guess. The problem with holding a right-side swing-out cylinder gun that way is that the cylinder tends to swing shut. (The French service revolver may have had a spring to hold the cylinder open; it's been a long time since I owned one.)

    All this is just my $.02, speaking as a right-hander.
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
  13. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    10,594
    Location:
    NW Florida
    This seems to have gone away - maybe because no one is taught the revolver anymore (damn bottom-feeders). But it's the way I learned.

    Place gun with trigger guard in palm of left hand, with index finger on barrel and little finger on frame aft of cylinder. Middle two fingers and thumb are holding the cylinder. Use right thumb to operate cylinder release and using middle two finger, push cylinder out of frame, using thumb to control speed.

    [​IMG]

    Point muzzle skyward and using left thumb, push ejector rod, causing all shells to fall out on the ground.

    [​IMG]

    Notice gun is securely held by fingers through the frame. You cannot drop the gun accidentally.

    Now tilt gun so muzzle is pointed downward, and holding LARGE gun in CLUMSY left hand, and turning cylinder with thumb and two fingers, load SMALL cartridges into cylinder using DEXTROUS right hand.

    [​IMG]

    Then close cylinder by pushing with left thumb, while using two middle fingers to control speed of closure.

    Seems like anyone, nowadays, that uses a revolver, keeps the gun in their right hand all the time. Pushes out the cylinder with the right index finger, hits the ejector rod with the palm of the left hand, load with the left hand and slaps the cylinder shut, with the left hand.
  14. Vikingsoneday

    Vikingsoneday New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    So far I've purchased two new guns this year and my wife is still speaking to me. But one more this soon and that could change.

    Yet it looks sooo sweet. Please don't tempt me like this! :)
  15. Hammerslagger

    Hammerslagger New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,097
    Ah Yes, the lost art of revolver shooting (and handgun marksmanship in general) in the USA: See Alpo's excellent revolver manipulation pictures above.

    See target described at: http://www.letargets.com/estylez_item.aspx?item=B-27R

    Distance equals 21 feet on edged turning target. Target is #B-27R (Indoor Range, Police Pistol Combat). Ten ring is nominal 4.5" H X 3" W, "X" ring is 2.2" X1.6". Time allowed for first course of fire equals 20 seconds. Typical revolver used = S&W Model 10 with 4" barrel, iron sights, no porting, for a Service Revolver match.

    First Stage, Course of Fire: Revolver holstered and loaded, strong side. Hand may not touch gun before target starts to turn. Target turns, and revolver is drawn and fired 6 shots, and reloaded, and fired 6 more shots. Speed loader is optional but recommended. Reload must be carried on body. Target edges again after 20 seconds.

    Competitive performance: All shots must hit Ten ring, almost all need to hit the "X" ring.

    In a later stage the target will be set at 50 feet. You will have 12 seconds to
    draw and fire 6 shots, all of which need to hit the ten ring to be competitive.

    Indoor PPC matches are typically won with 600/600 scores. Sometimes a 599 or even a 598 will win, bit not often in years past.

    Revolvers are not difficult to learn to shoot well; but no one was ever born knowing how to shoot one.
  16. RockinRiley

    RockinRiley New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Messages:
    143
    So why do those above want it in 22lr instead of magnum? I would think for a pocket gun as designed the magnum would have more luck at defense then a lr round!
  17. twobit

    twobit Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Messages:
    427
    Location:
    TEXAS!
    I was taught and I use Alpo's method of handling as described above.

    Back to the NAA with the swing out cylinder....any mention of price? I often carry one of their 22 minimags with the folding grip in a pocket as one of my carry pieces.
  18. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    10,594
    Location:
    NW Florida
    I'd want it in long rifle. It seems like a lousy excuse for a self-defense weapon, to me. So if I had one it would be a play-toy. Play-toy that shoots 3 cent long rifles beats the hell out of one that shoots 20 cent magnums.
  19. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    9,022
    Location:
    Northeast Georgia
    I like the looks of it. They came out with a top break version a while back and I haven't seen any of them in shops yet. This one probably won't make it out to the public any time soon, either.
  20. Hammerslagger

    Hammerslagger New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,097
    The persons at NAA are all very nice people. I have had personal dealings with several of them over the years, and wish for them and NAA the very best. Their customer service is second to none.

    I have owned several of their Mini-Revolvers. They are a good quality, niche product for situations where you really cannot (or do not want to) carry a bigger gun like a Kel-Tec P-3AT or Ruger LCP.

    They do require a familiarization (training and practice) period to become really competent in the use of; and they are certainly potentially effective out to at least 21 feet in the hand of a competent shooter. Persons that claim that they are inaccurate belly, "arms length", or "across a poker table" guns simply do not know what they are talking about.

    As to .22 LR vs .22 Magnum in a mini-revolver, one should go to the NAA website. The direct link you need is here: http://northamericanarms.com/ballistics
    At their website you will find a number of actual velocity tests conducted by NAA on its products. {Bear in mind that a .22 LR conversion cylinder will effectively turn a 1 1/8" barrel magnum frame gun into a 1 5/8" barrel (small frame) .22 LR gun for velocity measurements.}

    Simply stated the .22 Magnum cartridge needs a barrel significantly longer than 1 5/8" to achieve significantly higher velocities than you will observe from shooting a .22 LR with the same weight bullet from the same length, very short barrel.

    In a NAA magnum frame mini-revolver you will typically get less than 100 fps more velocity with most magnum ammo as compared to selected brands of commonly available .22 LR 40 grain ammo. What you will get shooting .22 Magnum ammo is 20+ cents a shot vs 3.5 to 8 cents a shot ammo costs for .22 LR. Also you get a lot more sharp, unpleasant recoil; and more muzzle blast, flash, and noise.

    Most importantly, .22 Magnum brass is thicker, tougher, and its priming is harder to set off than is most .22 LR ammo. Bottom line, .22 Mag. is significantly less reliable in these little revolvers as compared to shooting .22 LR in a NAA offered conversion cylinder.

    Needless to say, I recommend converting NAA Magnum minis to .22 LR.
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2012
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
.22-Rimfire Forum "Troy Landry" CCI minimags Dec 29, 2012
.22-Rimfire Forum Check Out This New 22 Mini-Revolver Oct 23, 2011
.22-Rimfire Forum CCI MiniMag 22LR/ Walmart Oct 19, 2011
.22-Rimfire Forum Taurus 94 hates CCI mini mags Dec 17, 2010
.22-Rimfire Forum Latest pics of 3rd prototype Ruger 10/22 mini machine gun stock kit. Oct 1, 2010