new here, few questions

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by letard, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. letard

    letard New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    New Zealand
    hi,

    Im about to purchase my first rifle. Thinking of a savage mk2, possibly this one here
    http://www.guncity.co.nz/22-savage-mk2-f-suppressed-scope-bunny-busting-package-xidp149304.html
    but may be with the heavy barrel
    i want it mainly for small pests like rabits nd possums, 100 yard shooting,
    and want it as accurate as possible.

    Questions
    1, Whats the difrince between the normal barrels nd the heavy barrel on the fv model? heavy barrel more accurate?

    2, For long range accuracy is soild nose or hollow point better?
    from what i have read hi vilocity rounds are good up till when they becouse sub sonic nd stray slightly. So good up to 60ish yards nd subsonic are beter over that but drop more. is that correct?

    3. Whats the difrince between jacketed rounds nd non. Also wich is better?

    4 Should i remove the silencer for longer range shooting?
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2009
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    Messages:
    10,583
    Location:
    NW Florida
    I don’t know about the Savage, but in general, there are three reasons for a heavy barrel.

    Barrels move when you shoot them. It’s called “barrel whip”. The thinner the barrel, the more whip. The heavier (and therefore stiffer) the barrel, the less whip. Less whip means more accuracy.

    This one applies more to pistols than to rifles, but it still applies. A heavy barrel hangs better. The gun’s balance. If most of the weight is in the stock, it is harder to hold on target. With more weight in the barrel, with the balance of the gun centered or slightly muzzle heavy, it is easier to hold on target.

    When the bullet goes down the barrel it makes heat. The more and faster you shoot, the hotter the barrel gets. When metal gets hot it moves. A thinner barrel will heat up faster, and just like with whip, move easier and farther. A thick (heavy) barrel will take longer to heat, and will move less.

    For long range, I’d say the solids would be better, simply because they are heavier, so hold their velocity longer. If you really want accuracy, you might want to look into the Paco Kelly Accurizer. http://www.gunblast.com/Paco2.htm

    Jacketed bullets aren’t. They have a copper wash on them. Much (much much much much) thinner than a bullet jacket. Non-jacketed bullets have a waxy lube on the bullet nose. Both the wash and the wax are to lube the bullet on its trip down the barrel, so your bore doesn’t’ fill with lead. The main advantage of the jacketed bullets is they don’t melt. If you do as I did as a kid – dump a box loose in my pocket – then your body heat will melt the lube. As you chamber the round the melted lube will smear on the case and the chamber, and may cause sticking when you attempt to eject. If you carry them loose in your pocket your body heat will melt the lube and they will pick up trash from your pocket (pocket lint, dirt) and then you put this in your barrel. If you don’t carry them like this – if you keep them in some type of ammo container (whether the original box, or something like an MTM ammo wallet) then you don’t have the melting/trash-collecting problem. Then the question of which is better is answered best by, “Which does your gun like better?”

    Last question – don’t know. My one silenced gun is a 22 pistol, I don’t use it for long range, and the silencer won’t come off anyway.
  3. raydcarter

    raydcarter New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2009
    Messages:
    160
    Welcome. I'm a fairly new shooter as well, but I'll add what I can and assume that if I err someone will be along to correct.

    I recently bought a MKII model BTVS (got a killer deal at the local CAL Ranch store). Love that gun. It will literally shoot one hole groups at 50 yards with a decent scope. I put on a BSA 3-12x airgun scope and it's working fine. For accuracy, I'd use a standard velocity round - even at 100 yards. The bullet will drop a bit, but it will certainly be consistant, so that's really not an issue - but then I also shoot airgun field target where we're routinely shooting up to 55 yards with an air rifle. I also think that you'll get maximum accuracy with a solid bullet as opposed to HP. What with ammo being hard to find, for a while you may just have to shoot what you can get - after that, I'd suggest you get small quantities of a variety of different rounds and try them. See what they do. I've read that particularly with pistols, but also to a lesser extent, with rifles - one round may shoot significantly better than another of the same design. I've tried Eley Sport and Wolf Target rounds with really good results at 50 yards. That's about all I've been able to get so far.
  4. BillP

    BillP New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2007
    Messages:
    192
    Location:
    On a lake near Detroit Lakes, MN
    You will be happy with the Savage. Savage guns in general have a reputation for being sort of plain in appearance but accurate rite out of the box. The trigger is very worthwhile, in recent years because of liability issues and the cost of hand labor, good triggers are found only on high priced guns. The accutrigger is a good way around this.

    Most good .22LR target ammo is wax lubricated and as alpo said the gold colored ones are not jacketed but merely lubricated in a way to keep them clean.

    With any rifle, you will have a "cold bore zero" and as the barrel heats up it will change. Rifles that change little are valued. Most rifles shoot their best groups after the barrel has heated up and is no longer changing. With some guns this change in Point Of Impact will show up as two distinct groups with others an obvious "walking" of POI is the case. You can see how this would mean different things to target shooters and hunters. I have seen rifles with light barrels that demonstrated a minimum of this phenomena but in general, the heavier the barrel the less of a problem this is.

    Rifles will also show a change in POI if you start with a clean lubricated barrel and this complicates the sighting in process. Because you rarely clean a 22LR this is not much of a problem.

    I can't help with your silencer question, In the US our government considers them heinous tools of organized crime. :rolleyes:
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
.22-Rimfire Forum random questions here... Mar 9, 2003
.22-Rimfire Forum Where to get Lyman type sights for a Remington 513T?? Sep 3, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum Here's a little Papoose I have been working on.... Aug 20, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum Where can I get some .22lr ammo? Mar 18, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum U22 Neos Carbine Kit- Where are they? Feb 21, 2013