New reloader

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Jack Ruby, Dec 6, 2009.

  1. Jack Ruby

    Jack Ruby New Member

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    New to reloading and don't know anybody that does to learn from, so im pretty much on my own here.

    Just got all my equipment and now reading the Lyman 49th before starting.
    Goal is to get proficient at 9mm then move on to the .357 Sig (why I really wanted to start reloading $$).

    In the Lyman handbook a 115gr. FMJ is not listed, however, a 115 gr. JHP is. Are the powder measurements interchangeable for the two at minimum levels or diffrent?
    If they are not interchangeable can anyone offer some suggestions to:
    Powder type?
    Starting powder grain weight?
    any other useful info?


    For future reference is reloading the .357 Sig challenging because of the "necking"?


    Thanks
  2. Jack Ruby

    Jack Ruby New Member

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    also...
    pop the primer before or after a go-around in the tumbler?
    how long in the tumbler?
  3. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    Jack Ruby

    Great manual for beginners! You CAN use the data for 115 jhp and fmj interchangeably for your powder load. DO NOT interchange FMJ and JHP seating lengths ! whatever you do - you will be seating your fmj's way too deep and cause a high pressure situation.

    Get yourself at least two sources of data to cross reference all of your loads, you may find one manual has data on 9mm fmj's unlike your current lyman manual. Its not only the data that is important here but the fact you will double check yourself by reading multiple sources.

    I like 5.5gr unique over 115gr fmj's seated at 1.130 for my 9mm load....... just off of minimum charge and still fun.

    I tumble first, cleaning your brass before running it through the dies prevents wear and build up of junk in the dies. If you decide to tumble after resizing you will be picking single grains of your tumbling media out of primer flash hole and exposing your dies to unnecessary wear if the brass is dirty.

    Good Luck....
  4. springerbuster

    springerbuster New Member

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    I am new to reloading too but have loaded and shot a couple thousand rounds of 9mm and 223. Like you I don't have any friends that reload, so what I have learned has been from books, reloading manuals and this forum. There are a lot of experienced and helpful people on this site so you will get lots of help as I did. As to your questions, I run my brass through the tumbler twice. First time with the primers still in, second time after I have removed them to remove the sizing lubricant and also this helps to clean out the primer pocket. On the different bullet question it is my understanding that as long as you are using load data for the same weight bullet you should be okay. I am sure you will get more answers from other people with more experience than me. With all load data it is very important to start with the minimum load and work up slowly. Hope this helps.
  5. Jack Ruby

    Jack Ruby New Member

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    thanks for the comments so far

    Yeah, I am planning on buying the Lee second edition loadbook next time I get to the store, since I have the Lee turret kit.
    With the 4 hole turret kit with the carbide dies do i need to remove the spent primer before the press or will it remove it during the process?
  6. RandyP

    RandyP Member

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    The Lee die deprimes and then primes on the turret using the primer arm on the downstroke of the ram.
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2009
  7. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro New Member

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    I use the Lee turret for my .40's, it's the same basic principal for 9's.
    I shoot the rounds, then scrounge around to find them all.
    Tumble them first, until they are clean (1-2hrs depending on the media/cleaner)
    Then I run them through my 4 dies,
    1. Size/Deprime, The turret press primes on the down stroke. My pistol dies are carbide, so lube is not needed. This greatly speeds up the process.
    2. Charge/Flare with pistol charging die and Lee auto disk charger. I don't check every charge, but I do check the first 5 and randomly spot check charges after that.
    3. Seat the bullet.
    4. Crimp with Lee factory crimp die.

    So far I've got 1500 rounds down the shute without issues using this process without issue.
  8. RandyP

    RandyP Member

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    I have judiciously place a small desk lamp on my reloading bench that shines enough light inside the cases to verify the powder charge as I am placing the bullet on the case. Just a second level of safety check for me using the turret.

    I too weigh the first 5-10 charges and then use the appropriate Wilson cartridge gauge on about every 5th completed round before I put it in the ammo box tray.
  9. army mp

    army mp Member

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    Jack The Lee manual is a good book. However. I would get a Manual for the bullets you are loading. Hornady, Speer, or what ever. As said above. Be careful with the OAL The only problem with the Lee Manual. It seems to be a Little Generic. I don’t load 357 Sig but I think it’s a high pressure round . And a near max load seated to deep can give you real problems
  10. Jack Ruby

    Jack Ruby New Member

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    I haven't set up my press yet. But I got the Lee Turret press and the 4 carbide 9mm luger dies, plus I ordered the Lee Safety Primer so I can prime on the press. Is that not needed or is that what you use to prime?
  11. RandyP

    RandyP Member

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    I prime on the press. The system works very well IMHO.
  12. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro New Member

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    I use the safety prime for the pistol cartridges. It works well once you get used to it, be prepared to pick up a few primers until you find the sweet spot though.
  13. zb338

    zb338 New Member

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    Jack,
    You probably would have been better off starting with the Sig .357. A necked
    cartridge is very easy to reload for. The 9MM can be a pain because the case has a
    gentle slope going from larger at the base to a tiny bit smaller at the neck. It is sometimes
    hard to crimp a bullet properly. When you finish a cartridge push the bullet against a bench
    or something solid and check to see if it slides into the case.

    Zeke
  14. 312shooter

    312shooter Active Member

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    I disagree, you can't get any more basic as far as reloading goes than with 9mm - brass is plentiful and inexpensive. Experimenting with die set up as a new reloader before you actually load a round will most likely cause a few trashed casings of course, do it cheap. 357sig is very reloadable I'm sure however google ".357sig data" and read what other reloaders say about it, it can be a tricky one and requires a bit of attention to detail to control chamber pressure, not something I'd suggest someone new to start with!


    Your sizing die is there to do just that - size the brass back to factory dimensions weather it has a taper "slope" or not. Also with the four die set you will have no problems as you are crimping on your fourth die station seperately. Crimping gets complicated when trying to use the seating die to seat the bullet and simultaneously crimp (other dies are designed to do this) so set the crimp die up per the instructions and enjoy.
  15. scrat

    scrat New Member

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    +1 9mm is very very easy and cheap to reload
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