New S&W Mod 64 need advice

Discussion in 'Centerfire Pistols & Revolvers' started by bigdel, Aug 6, 2010.

  1. bigdel

    bigdel New Member

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    Purchased a new S&W 64-7 last week and went to the range today. I'm used to shooting semi autos and needless to say, could use some tips shooting the revolver. My son and I both put about 25 rounds through it each at 25 yards (min distance at my range) and were all over the place. If I had to use it for self defense, I hope I scare em to death, because I sure couldn't hit em. Btw, we mostly fired in sa.
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2010
  2. old semperfi

    old semperfi New Member

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    i live in southern indiana,old country boy at hear
    im not sure i can help or not,first you need to try a couple different kinds of ammo.this will make sure thats not the problem.next i would see if you are gripping the pistol the same each time,you may even want to look at different grips.all of my pistols either semi auto or revolvers wear houge finger type grips.last of all have each other load gun and skip a few rounds,without looking fire gun.if you notice movement when pistol goes click instead of bang you are antisipating recoil. old semperfi
  3. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    i would say your grip is not consistent and you're flinching. i would dry fire it a lot to get a good feel for it. in both double and single action mode.
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    When I got my first handgun about 25 years ago the "broadside of the barn" was safe. I put a red dot on the Ruger MK II and that helped somewhat but the thing that elevated by skill the most was practice. I practiced every day, following all the good techniques I read about, in my garage with an precision adult air gun pistol. I joined an indoor range and went once a week, rain or shine, and shot 22's and my 38 SPL revolver. Within a year the fly on "the barn door" was in trouble. It is indeed all about practice and practice every day makes a difference.

    So buy an air gun and practice, practice, practice.

    LDBennett
  5. bigdel

    bigdel New Member

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    I agree on the practice part, but am assuming it is my grip since I do well with my autos. I am griping the same but would guess it might be somewhat different for a revolver. I also believe that I may be flinching so will work with dry firing. I also will continue to practice, practice and practice some more as well as try some different ammo....although at this point would say it is the shooter, not the gun or ammo:)
  6. johnlives4christ

    johnlives4christ Former Guest

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    what type of grips do you have on the gun, this makes a difference, and are you shooting one handed or two handed or both?
  7. kda

    kda New Member

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    You say your pistol is for self defense. Trust me, if your are at least 25 yards from your "threat", you are much better off moving away and out of the area than trying to hit him at 75 feet.

    It is quite well accepted that the vast majority of self-defense situations occur in relatively dim light and at distances under seven yards .. less than a third of the distance at which you are starting to learn to shoot your pistol.

    I can imagine nothing more demoralizing and disheartening than trying to learn to shoot a new pistol at distances which, for a beginner, are unrealistic and quite difficult, if not impossible.

    I start new shooters at 3-5 yards, which, accept it or not, is a very typical self-defense encounter distance. And I keep them at that distance until they are consistently shooting 4-6 inch groups, or better. Even this will take some time as your muscle memory becomes trained to always deliver a consistent grip and trigger pull. And it is a confidence builder also, at least they can hit the target every time. Trust me that is important encouragement to keep you going.

    Later, I'll move them to an occasional target at seven yards and only when I think they are actually ready to carry the weapon on their person will I move them out to 10 yards ... 30 feet.

    There really is no purpose for someone training for SD to worry about how they shoot at greater distances, not that after you get good at 10 yards you might not want to play around with "target shooting" at greater distances.

    Bottom line, stop beating yourself up with this 75 feet stuff. Move the target in very close and focus on consistent grip and trigger pull / trigger pull and trigger pull. Tighten up your groups, then gradually move the target out. You will learn to shoot much faster this way because you will allow yourself some positive feedback and that will encourage you to practice more and more often.

    If your range won't let you shoot closer than 75 feet, ask them why not. Why can't you set up your own target closer as long as you stay in your own lane? So maybe they don't have holes in the ground for you to use their stand, but you can rig up something, or encourage them to open a "pistol" range if not a pistol lane or two.

    Or find a place in the country where you can pull off the road (old quarry perhaps) and set up your own targets. Ask around at all your gun stores to see if they know of such a place. Many may not but eventually you'll learn of such a spot. Be persistent in your search. Make friends with a farmer or "gentleman landowner". But whatever you do, stop the 75 feet stuff at this stage in your shooting. It will only discourage you and this can later seriously complicate a legitimate and positive training experience.

    Good luck.
  8. user

    user Active Member

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    Most semiauto's use a "combat sight picture" in which the dot on the front sight IS the point of impact. A revolver, on the other hand, places the point of impact just above the front sight. So if most of your rounds are going high, that's part of the problem. Also, the grip is different with a revolver, the left hand should be rotated forward a bit if you're a right handed shooter, and slid a bit lower under the grip to stabilize the gun. Make sure to keep all fleshy parts away from the front end of the cylinder - the plasma blast that comes out from between the cylinder and the barrel will take the end of a finger or thumb clean off.

    You may have heard the old saying about using a saw or a hammer, let the tool do the work? Same thing goes for revolvers. People try too hard. Let the revolver rest in your hands, and when the target finds your sights, squeeze the trigger. You may be anticipating the blast, but you need to just be calm and wait for the blast to occur on its own. All you have to do is hold the gun and sqeeze the trigger. It's a zen thing - don't talk to yourself, don't think about it. Get your brain out of the way, and just watch it happen.
  9. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    Also concentrate on remembering the last sight picture before the gun moves in recoil. If you do that you will see your flinch and not close your eyes with the blast of the gun. Follow through of the gun hold is also important. Let the gun go where it will. Don't force it off to the side or down or whatever. Keep a good grip on it but let it move where it wants to go every time exactly the same way.

    LDBennett
  10. zb338

    zb338 New Member

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    kda,
    Our club shoots bullseye at the 25 yard NRA target. We have a few
    shooters that can shoot in the 90s with one hand using revolvers.
    My old worn out K-38 will put 5 shots touching when shot over the bench
    at 25 yards. It should be no trick to keep all your shots on the NRA paper at 25 yards.
    Zeke
  11. vytoland

    vytoland New Member

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    not many can jump out of the box and start riding. it takes practice.

    if possible, start with the target at 5 to 7 yards, take your time, aim carefully and DO NOT anticipate the shot. stay focused on the target sight and squeeze off the shot. the shot should come as a complete surprise. focus on the your guns front sight and not when the shot will come.

    nothing is perfected right away.. it takes practice and concentration............1000's of rounds.
  12. bigdel

    bigdel New Member

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    thanks for the advice. I havent been back out but maybe tomorrow. Unfortunately, I am unable to set the target up any closer so will continue to use a larger target. I will adjust my grip and try to eliminate any flinching and I am sure that will go a long way.
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