New to firearms-Advice

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by honkey, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    Hi all, I am new to guns in a lot of ways. Unlike most people, I will not be learning to shoot from my dad, or getting advice from him. I have talked to my brother a little bit, but he is pretty new to guns also. I was telling him that I want to buy a few guns for self-defense and hunting. He offered to give me his .22 pistol to learn to shoot with and told me the guns I was looking at were too big for a beginner (I told him I wanted a .357 magnum and a .44 magnum). Now, I am thinking that I should get a rifle for hunting (we want to hunt hogs) and maybe get a handgun to have by my side... I do not want to break the bank on this and will probably buy used. Can anyone give advice on a rifle and a handgun that would fit my requirements? I was looking at a Rossi Single Shot .308 rifle and then trying to find a .357 magnum for around $250. Am I being unrealistic?

    I like the idea of having the .22 for practice shooting, the .357 for carry and back up while hog hunting, and the rifle for the main hunting gun.
  2. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    hi honkey so who is going to be showing u how to shoot? Don't go jumping in to buying a bunch of guns till u get the feel .22 pistol or rifle is a good choice. Are u new to guns because u are young or u just want to start shooting?
  3. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    Oops, meant to say that I am not a 100% newbie. I did shoot rifle and shotguns in Boy Scouts when I was younger. I also do have a good BB/Pellet gun (I know... Not the same) but everything I have shot, I have managed to pick up quickly and I will obviously spend a lot of time at a range before I go on my first hunt.
  4. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    I do have some friends that will help and my brother is going to get me started in a few weeks when he gives me his .22 pistol. I am hoping to find someone that has private land nearby with a hog problem to teach me how to hunt.

    I am new because my mom wouldn't allow me to shoot other than when I was at Boy Scouts when I was a kid and then never had anyone to help me out. My dD was in the Army, but never taught me or my brother how to shoot... Probably just didn't think it was important. From what he has told me though, he was pretty bad with a rifle. I am 21 now.
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  5. BETH

    BETH Well-Known Member

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    the main thing is range time so u are comfortable with firearms and safe with them
  6. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

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    Welcome to TFF honkey. If you're hunting hogs, I like the idea of having a mag fed vice a single shot, but with a .357 for back-up, you can make do with the Rossi. Are you looking to find each gun for around $250? If so, you can find each for $175 - $300 range realistically.

    Do you have a range to shoot at or just the woods/backyard field? Either way; study up on your gun before you put any live ammo in it. Break it down, clean it and make sure it's ready to perform. If you're in no rush to hunt asap; then take your brother up on his offer of the .22 and go shoot alot with it. Then save up some more $$ and find the best deal for what you want.
    Yes, if you were to go with a 44mag first, I'd say that you'd most likely develop some bad flinching habits with handguns. Start by developing good consistent technique with the 22 and then move up. Buy a 357 and shoot 38's in it; you'll shoot cheaper while practicing and then still have plenty of gun for hogs.

    Hope this helps give you some ideas,

    Woolley
  7. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    .308 Win is a good "all around" cartridge, with a goodly number of different bullet weights and velocities available as factory loads. It certainly will do for most hog (as well as deer and varmint) hunting. I would question the idea of buying a single shot, of any brand - as opposed to purchasing a used bolt action (Savage makes very accurate and low priced rifles.) A bolt action is a bit more costly but is also much more versatile.
    As to a .357 Mag. handgun - you should be able to find used S&Ws or Rugers close to your $250 range - probably will run closer to $350 for a decent condition used revolver. As a hunting gun, you'll probably want a 4" or longer barrel - which puts the piece into the "difficult" to conceal category. You've got a bunch of choices and decisions to make and if I were you, I wouldn't go about it without some solid consideration, which you seem to be doing. As to specific models, well there's a bunch out there that will fit your needs, but if you stick with S&W or Ruger for a double action revolver, you will have less chance of buying a junker. .357 Mag. is versatile in that you can shoot a wide range of .38 SPL loads of a wide range of power levels, through it, as well as the magnums, which also come in a lesser variety of power levels. .44 Magnum gun will cost more for a decent piece and the ammo is about double the cost of the .357 mags and not the best choice for a concealed weapon - frame is usually a bit larger than on the .357s.
    The .22 is arguably the best way to learn technique without introducing "bad habits" picked up by shooting heavier recoiling loads.
    More questions?
    I'm sure there will be a large number of responders giving you a lot more to consider - as is usual with this question.
  8. Polydorus

    Polydorus New Member

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    You might look for a hunter safety course in your area.
  9. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    Wow, thanks for all the advice so far! I will be going to an indoor shooting range to learn how to shoot the pistol my brother is giving me. I am hoping to find the magnum in the $250-300 range. I have seen the Rossi for a little under $200, but if I can find a used bolt action that would be good for hogs, I would definitely consider that if it is at the same price... I just thought a single shot would be alright.
  10. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    honkey,
    Advice from an old vet - quick follow-up shots are nice to have available in a quick moving, uncertain environment - which I understand (no personal experience) is likely in hog hunting; especially if the old 400 lb boar turns on you.
  11. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    Earlier when I was looking at a store's inventory online, I saw Rossi Rifle/Shotgun combos at really low prices. I assumed that they worked ok as a rifle and ok as a shotgun, but not really good as either one. Is this the case, or are they actually OK for hunting with...? I saw one that was a .44 mag/20ga for $175.
  12. rhmc24

    rhmc24 Member

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    A lot of good thoughts above. Chances are as you learn you will change your mind about what you want. i think we all go/went thru that. Consider buying your best combo of price/like with that in mind.
  13. carver

    carver Moderator

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    First thing is Welcome to the Forum! Your brother was knowledgeable enough to steer you away form the .44Mag up front. I have one that I shoot a lot now, but I didn't have anyone to teach me how to shoot it many years ago. I did learn some bad habits form that hand gun that me shooting badly for a long time. The .22 is a good starting hand gun. The .357 is a great gun, but like others have said, practice with .38's in it, then move up to the Mag rounds. And a Savage bolt action rifle, in .308, with scope, can be had new for around $300. Good luck, keep asking questions, and let us know what you decide to purchase.
  14. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    Thanks guys, keep the advice coming! I am going to go to a gun dealer today just to see some things up close... No shooting today since I should wait for my brother to give me better advice, but I want to see these guns in person.
  15. honkey

    honkey New Member

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    All right, I went three different places today and had three very different experiences...

    -Larry's Pistol and Pawn- Nice guys, informative, showed me a few guns, didn't go out of there way to help like they did with the customer before me, but they were busy and I told them I was just looking and checking out prices, so not surprised... They had a few guns that they showed me that seemed fair. They did tell me it would be hard to find a .357 magnum that would be good for hogs and concealed carry.

    The first was a 30-06 rifle with a scope. I wrote down that it was a Mossberg Maverick and $206 pr $226 (it was on sale and I can't remember which price it was)

    The second gun was a .38 special, which I realize could not be used for hogs, but it on sale for $208 and would easily fit in a pocket

    There was also a .357 for $330, but it is just a little out of my price range and I am starting to wonder whether or not I need a back up gun for hog hunting if I have a good rifle. Advice here?

    Second store was Gander Mountain. I am pretty sure they were trying to rip me off since I told them it was my first time buying a gun. The guy told me that I could buy a 223 rifle for $300 and add a $150 scope and have a good hog hunting rifle if I also bought a $300 9mm to finish it off. This sounded like bad advice and expensive, not to mention I do have my heart set on a revolver and don't have any interest in a 9mm semi. They did also have a Taurus .327 federal for $275, but my thought was that for that price I am sure I can find a used .357 and be better off for hogs.

    The third store was a pawn shop and they guy was really friendly. They didn't have much but he was telling me he could take a bit off of the price tags for me "since it was my first gun." (Most likely does that for everyone, but was acting nice). He had a gun that I was particularly interested in... It wasn't as pretty as some of the others, but I am more interested in how it shoots than how the finish on the handle looks.

    The gun was an INA .38 revolver and on it, it had a tag that said Model 3. He offered it to me for $125, it felt good in my hand and he told me that it was fully functional and if I had a problem he would swap it out for a newer, more expensive gun, but he had fired it before and said it works fine.

    The last gun that I liked the look of was a S&W .38 that he offered to take down from $275 to $250 and it looked like it was in great condition, same deal as the other one if i had a problem. It felt just a little bit weird though. I felt like the trigger was a stretch for my finger to reach buy maybe a centimeter... Could get used to it.

    Can anyone offer advice based on what I saw?

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