OK smart guys....answer this....

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by jlloyd73, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. jlloyd73

    jlloyd73 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,965
    So, a bunch of my buddies came by today and we were shooting all kinds of stuff.

    My question is this......two different rounds in particular....

    We shot a 416 Rigby a bunch and a 338 Lapua a bunch........right after we shot the guns and ejected the brass you could pick up the brass and it was always cold. The brass never got warm or hot.

    I could never get a clear answer from my buddy......he wanted me to figure it out for myself and i just cannot figure it out or find the answer anywhere.

    Do any of you know why/how this happens?
  2. WHSmithIV

    WHSmithIV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    Messages:
    4,640
    Location:
    Moore, Idaho
    What was the temperature outside when you were shooting?
  3. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    4,938
    Location:
    SW Fort Worth
    Were they handloads? Milder loads often don't get too hot.
  4. jlloyd73

    jlloyd73 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,965
    maybe pushing the mid to high 60s.
  5. cycloneman

    cycloneman Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2008
    Messages:
    8,007
    Location:
    Louisiana
    I have also seen Hornady light mag compressed loads act like that. Extremely clean too.
  6. jlloyd73

    jlloyd73 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    1,965
    They were handloads, but they do a mid to high charge in their ammo, so nothing light.
  7. JLA

    JLA Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,237
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    The big magnums use slow powders that do not burn nearly as hot as faster powders do. Fire a .300 WM and a .223 next to each other and immediately eject the brass into your hand. the .223 will be a blazing and the WM will be barely warm.
  8. 76Highboy

    76Highboy Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    8,540
    That is exactly right. The higher the pressure rate the hotter the brass.
  9. WHSmithIV

    WHSmithIV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    Messages:
    4,640
    Location:
    Moore, Idaho
    Keep in mind also that by the time the brass has ejected and hit the ground it won't be very warm anymore. So, if it takes you 10 seconds before you pick it up it will not be hot. I fire off 3 or 4 clips from my .45, pick up the brass and none of it is even warm to touch - not even the steel casings. Most of the heat follows the bullet out the barrel.
  10. JLA

    JLA Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,237
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    Clips?? You shootn a chinese C96 clone?
  11. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,400
    Brass gets hot, but the heat dissipates pretty quickly if the gun is not being fired rapidly because the steel of the barrel and chamber will absorb the heat. Obviously, if the ambient temperature is cool/cold, the heat of the case will dissipate more rapidly.

    But if the gun is fired rapidly (an AR-15 in .416 Rigby?) then the steel doesn't get a chance to cool; in fact it gets hot and stays hot. Not only does it not absorb heat, but it transfers its heat to the cartridge cases, which then become too hot to pick up or, in the extreme, can result in a cookoff.

    Jim