Old .22 Rifles

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by grampawmike, May 27, 2010.

  1. grampawmike

    grampawmike New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Mojave Desert, CA
    dteed: The little guns are fun to work with, and on....this one is a departure from what normally was made. It is all pretty heavy stamped steel except the barrel which is iron, wrapped in a stamped steel sleeve. The first version of this gun had a brass barrel...wrapped in steel. These guns were so cheap that they were sometimes called "punch" guns. Every time you bought grain from a mill you got a "punch" on a card....enough punches.....a new gun. Some mills would even hide some in 100 lb. sacks of grain. You would have a 1 in 10 chance or so of getting a little gun when you bought your chicken feed. Early marketing technique.
    These guns mostly came blued with a fairly light color stain to the stock, but a top-end variation could be had with nickle plate and a walnut stock. I believe this version sold originally for about $2.50 or so. The one I have has no blue, and I'm betting that some kid decided to 'shine' his standard version up to look like the fancy one. There was no stock or forend either, and this lends more credence to my thoughts re: a kid trying to do a homemade 'upgrade'. I'll bead blast this one and blue with Brownell's Oxpho-Blue. The stuff works well on the older stuff from my experience. A gentleman in Georgia sent me a template from the one he's working on and I'll make the stock from alder or birch....slab sided and stained as the original. Mike
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2010
  2. gazzmann

    gazzmann New Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2009
    Messages:
    147
    Location:
    So. Fla.
    grampawmike you're not alone out there.
    Those old rifles are some of the finest tack drivers ever produced.
    I've got a few myself and won't any of the junk made today.
    Winchester, Remington, Savage / Stevens, Springfield, High Standard, JC Higgins, Ranger, Western Field Hamilton, Sears it don't matter the off brands were made by the big companies.
    They are a blast to tear down and rebuild. Most are so simple it's amazing.
    All the gun companies have learned over the years are how to cut corners and save $$$.
  3. grampawmike

    grampawmike New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Mojave Desert, CA
    gazzmann: Correct, I totally agree. Many 'off brands' are very well made little guns, and VERY basic. This Hamilton has got to be one of best examples of ....simple. One spring, direct trigger to hammer sear, one spacer and a few screws. I have an old Western Field pump shotgun (don't remember the mod, and I'm not going onto the safe to look) which is actually a Stevens M-520. One hell of a stout and well made shotgun. These, somewhat overlooked and less known, guns designed by John Browning (originally to be marketed as the Stevens/Browning) around 1903 or so, were actually held in some military armories as riot guns up into the early 1990's. I'm still looking for a 28 inch or so barrel for mine as it was 'chopped' by an idiot sometime in the past. Mike
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2010
  4. Para Cassatt

    Para Cassatt New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Nice pics. I like the oldies myself. I have a couple old Remingtons but seldom find any good ones around here. I would like to find some of the Anshcutzs that Savage used to sell.
  5. grampawmike

    grampawmike New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Mojave Desert, CA
    I purchased an old M-64 Anschutz for my son (way back) for his 9th B-Day. I also owned a BSA Martini ISU Match rifle with a left hand action. Both were very fine pieces of machinery. I sold them both when my son wanted to get away from position shooting and go to something with more "action". We went to trap shooting, which we still do...he's almost 40 now. I still like the cheap little boy's rifles.....and they are a lot less expensive than the Anschutz or Martini guns......and they are a piece of our history that many overlook. Mike
  6. Bigredneck

    Bigredneck New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    I just got this one today. She an old one but looks great.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  7. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    5,973
    Location:
    Ohio NRA Member
    I like that old Hamilton...and nice work!
    I like the "old" .22's as well. Most of them are great shooters and some Ive found
    sittin around for years and hasnt seen a good cleaning for who knows how long,
    Ya get'em cleaned up and they shoot just as good as they ever did.
    I gave my cousin an old WesternField that looked like it'd been run over by a truck in a gravel driveway for some work he done for me and had intentions of bringing the "looks" back to life. But as far as the shooting, ya couldnt beat it! The old bolt action worked great and reached out there.
  8. carver

    carver Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2008
    Messages:
    16,183
    Location:
    DAV, Deep in the Pineywoods of East Texas, just we
    Nice post guys! Love the older guns. There used to be a lawyer in Shreveport, LA that would vist the pawn shops on a daily basis. He was always on the the lookout for old, inexpensive .22's. He would fix them up and give them away to the boys, and girls that came to an NRA sponsored shooting event for kids. With the parents permission. I own a bunch of .22 rifles. Two are modern guns, the rest are older rifles that will shoot circles around the modern guns. These are my hunting rifles.
  9. general

    general New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    53
    Location:
    Eastern Oregon
    Grampaw Mike,

    I too have a nice old Stevens Little Scout 14&1/2, Just had my gunsmith do a small repair to a crack in the stock and then a finish job with hot linseed oil. It really looks nice and the little thing still shoots like a champ. Dead on at 80 yds the other day. It was the first time shot in the last 38 years that I know of. I inhereted it from my father in law and I have been in his life for that 38 years and I know that it had never been out of the gun cabinet in all that time. He purchased it off the shelf when he was a boy, He passed at 88.

    general
  10. dragonfly

    dragonfly New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    100
    Location:
    Lilburn, Ga
    I have a couple old ones. I grew up shooting a Remington Mdl 24. It was made in 1925 according to the serial number. I retired it when it was 39 and I was 13 when I bought a Win. 62A with money I made detasseling corn one summer in Iowa where I grew up.[​IMG]

    Then a year or so ago I got to talking with a fellow at work one day and ended up with a Win 1906 that was made either in 1915 or 1916. Seems to be a little confusing with the serial number, but I believe 1916 is the correct year. It really shoots good. Reminds me of my beloved 62A that was stolen while I was in college. Thank God, the thief didn't find my Remington. [​IMG] I sold a Mossberg 44b that was made in 1939. I sold it to finance a couple of other new rifles. Sorry to see it go... it was a grand old rifle, but one I knew my son and his kids wouldn't care for. Here is a pic anyway...[​IMG]
  11. Para Cassatt

    Para Cassatt New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Nice guns Dragonfly. How did that Mossberg shoot?
  12. crooks420

    crooks420 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Howdy,

    I was recently given this old 1934 Mossberg Model 34 .22 cal. single-shot bolt-action rifle. Looks to be all original and fairly good condition. Seems to shoot fairly consistent as well, though I have not sighted it in yet.
    After taking the bolt apart to clean out that old "gummy" grease, I found the firing pin has cracks.
    So now I am in search of a new (used) firing pin and/or striker assembly and/or a complete bolt assembly. I have learned that the bolt is interchangeable with the Mossberg 30, which is also the Wards Western Field models 35A & 37.
    It still fires rounds, but I want to be prepared for the inevitable. I'm not sure if I want to refinish the rifle... I kinda like the rustic and well used look of it.
    Any help with a striker/ firing pin/ bolt would be greatly appreciated.

    Jesse

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
  13. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    5,973
    Location:
    Ohio NRA Member
    You might try numrich gun parts.
  14. crooks420

    crooks420 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    I've tried numrich, Havlin, and Hoosier Gun Works..... no luck.

    Jesse
  15. pilote

    pilote New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    i just refinished a savage 63 and mossberg 151mb...i did a good job; they look sensational and are fun to shoot...everyone who sees them wants to shoot it, especially the little savage single shot bolt...

    never had any interest in the modern tacticool rimfires (or even the 10/22; just no personality)...if i pick up another rimfire it will be another older wood stock rifle that i can refinish and bring back to life...
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
.22-Rimfire Forum Mossberg .22 Rifles Jan 24, 2014
.22-Rimfire Forum Pump action rifles... Aug 1, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum Henry Lever Rifles other than 22lr. Apr 1, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum How about some rare or unusual .22 rifles Mar 25, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum Evil features on rifles Mar 19, 2013

Share This Page