Old .22 Rifles

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by grampawmike, May 27, 2010.

  1. ozo

    ozo Well-Known Member

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    I remember when Sears,Roebuck, and Co. stores were a new thing.
    As a kid, riding my bicycle to the store, and spending hours inside looking
    at the guns. JC Higgins, Ted williams, etc. , many made by Stevens, and
    ALL of them right out there for me to touch.
  2. ozo

    ozo Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Nathan,
    My personal advice may sound cold, and I hope not.
    A large part of this 'gun world' is not the cost, but
    what you get as a final toy after you spend all the time
    restoring a piece. Frustrating at times, but when it's done,
    and everyone is through yelling at you (spouse, etc.) a million
    times, not only is the reward great, but you can't wait to start another project !
  3. dksac2

    dksac2 New Member

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    Fantastic post and a great way to spend your time.
    I love the old .22 rifles, but have a hard time finding them. When I do, if I have the $$$, i'll buy them.
    They are great to fix up and everone preserves a piece of American gun making history.

    Fantastic looking rifles guys !!!!

    Just finished an old Winchester single shot 22, love them. Looking for an 1890 pump Win that I can afford. When I had my gunsmithing shop, I had a guy bring in an 1890 that was a train wreck. I carefuly put the stock back togather, draw filed and polish all the pits out, a wheel never touched it, all handwork. When he got it back, he started crying, it was his grandfathers and he though it looked better than a new one. I put a lot of hours in it. Didn't charge him what the work was really worth, but it was worth it to me to bring the little gun back to a beautiful shooter. I rust blued it, didn't want to return it, it was one of those few guns that I put so much work into to make it as perfect as possible, it felt like mine.
    Only wish I still had the before and after pics, they got lost in several moves.

    Keep up your great work and keep working with the kids, best thing a person can do.

    John K
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  4. wkd

    wkd New Member

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    Very nice 513 sporter! Would love to have one but the price of them has just gone nuts.
  5. dksac2

    dksac2 New Member

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    Try Jack First, Inc.
    They don't have a web site, but a web search will get you their phone number. They mostly sell to gunsmiths, but will also sell to the public.
    The gal on the phone has more knowladge about gun parts than anyone I know, old fashion service. Great people to deal with.

    John K
  6. crooks420

    crooks420 New Member

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    Thanks John,
    Someone had recomended Jack First so I called them: nothing in stock, but something could be made for $100- $150.

    I am still looking, but I may end up sending them my parts.... if I dont find anything within a few months.
    I picked up a Mossberg model 40 striker assembly, which is very similar to the model 34, but the firing pin is totally different. I am going to try to modify the striker and make the firing pin using off-the-shelf parts from McMaster-Carr. We'll see how that goes. I also need to find an extractor for the Mossberg Model 34.

    Jesse

    Jesse
  7. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    Here's something to think about when it comes to these old "boys rifles."

    They say condition is everything when it comes to evaluating guns, cars, about anything. Following are a couple of interesting examples in my collection, BUT, from two different schools of thought.

    MINT. Appears unfired. spent last 30 years untouched in a gun safe. The father who owned it BEFORE that for a couple of decades or so, was said to have never fired it. A VERY nice little gun to have.

    [​IMG]

    STEVENS LITTLE SCOUT 14 1/2.

    USED. However, on the other hand, this next little guy definitely has MUCH more character and interest than that. It makes the Little Scout seem absolutely boring by comparison.

    [​IMG]

    HAMILTON NO. 43 short & long only.

    It's obviously been owned by some young chap who loved it. He took his jacknife and "checkered" it, probably to look like his Dad's big rifle. And being a proud hunter, he carved 8 notches in the comb of it to "show off" his hunting prowess.

    He even screwed a little eye screw into the front of the forestock to attach a cord so he could hang it around his neck or over his shoulder like a sling. The rear sight is missing, the forestock has a couple of serious cracks, and the sear's so worn out the little guy won't cock. May be that's when he retired it from service.

    [​IMG]

    Just handling this little POS conjures up a host of possible stories, and pictures to your mind. I like it. It's one gun in my collection which will have NO restoration work performed on it. It's got too much class the way it is to spoil it.

    Two sides to every coin...

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
  8. GunHugger

    GunHugger Well-Known Member

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    FloridaFialaFan,

    Don't you have a United boys rifle like this one?

    [​IMG]
  9. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    Yep! AND, got the Hamilton No. 027 Jap-made clone in original box.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the United ad for the German clone of the Hoban.

    [​IMG]

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
  10. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    Which is the Hoban and which is the United?

    [​IMG]

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
  11. GunHugger

    GunHugger Well-Known Member

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    :D I know which is which...

    The United that I posted above is your United. I sold it to you.

    Good to see you again and hope all is good with you and your wife.
  12. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    No wonder your gunhugger handle sounded familiar. Here's pic of the pretty little SIERRA Japanese clone. There are two other variations with CA importers' names stamped on them. I hope to someday find one of each.

    [​IMG]

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2011
  13. FloridaFialaFan

    FloridaFialaFan New Member

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    When World War I was brewing, public interest in assembling Boy Scout Troops into mini-military groups, to dress up in uniform and practice drilling with .22rf rifles which looked like miniature Army rifles, quickly became all the rage in the US.

    Parents enrolled their young sons into "Military Academies" for their schooling and these too had their uniforms and .22 cal. "drill rifles." Following the Armistice at war's end, Winchester sold off thousands of returning surplus Army issued .22rf "training rifles."

    "Military" .22s were a VERY popular Boy Toy for almost two decades with the youthful shooters of early 1900.

    Below are pictured some of my boys rifles made to mimic the "military" look so popular with many shooters of the day. This first little "musket" was made by a company in Connecticut formed by Richard Sears to furnish Sears & Roebuck with rifles when Winchester refused to sell to them because they were a discount house.

    [​IMG]

    MERIDEN ARMS CO. .22rf "CADET"

    In 1912 Remington entered the market with their .22rf single-shot full-wood rifle, a Model No.4-S they too used the name "CADET." In 1913 three various Boy Scout organizations operating in the US vied with each other to name that years production of the 4-S. Only an estimated 1500 were made.

    [​IMG]

    REMINGTON NO.4-S, "AMERICAN BOY SCOUT" .22rf SHORTS.

    From 1914 to 1924 Remington continued to market the 4-S under a new name. It's guesstimated that from 1912 to 1924 a total of 15,000 of these rifles were made.

    [​IMG]

    REMINGTON NO. 4-S, "MILITARY MODEL" .22 S-L-LR.

    Below is one of the last training rifles contracted from Winchester for WW I troops. The contract was signed in1918 just one month before the signing of the Armistice!

    [​IMG]

    85 WINCHESTER WINDER LOW-WALL MUSKET, .22 SHORT.

    I'm always looking for more...

    Best regards ~ ~ ~ FFF
  14. dragonfly

    dragonfly New Member

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    For real fun, get a box of rat shot, a hot summers day and an over grown field or pasture, and shoot those big old grasshoppers when they take off. More fun than teal with a 20 ga.:eek: It is not fair to wait for them to land.:D
  15. wiener

    wiener New Member

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    Try Wisners...he re-manufactures some old disc. parts. He makes a firing pin for my old #46 now. I think the 35,45,46 all used the same FP. #35-8
    http://www.wisnersinc.com/rifles/mossberg/moss_start.html
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