old time survival skills

Discussion in 'The Hunting & Fishing Forum' started by jack404, May 13, 2012.

  1. 1LoneWolf75

    1LoneWolf75 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2012
    Messages:
    684
    Location:
    Humboldt KS
  2. jstgsn

    jstgsn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    2,219
    Location:
    Milford, Delaware
    Great books. My mother used to read them and try different things. Made soap, cooked different critters. Old ground hog was the worst, think we left some glands in it or something. Dad was mad for a week. I raised my sons to survive in the wild. Taught them how to hunt and fish, make a fire in the rain, and a shelter in the snow. It paid off as all three are hard working young men who love the outdoors. Raised them on a cross between the Foxfire books, the boy scout books, and pat mcmanus's stories. Worked for me.
    thanks jack.
  3. H-D

    H-D Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1,336
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Thanks for the link Jack!
  4. W4YAH

    W4YAH New Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Northwest Florida
    Great books. I have two in the series gifted from my grandma.
  5. Shoobee

    Shoobee Former Guest

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    If you always have a knife, then with that and a bootlace you can always make a fire-bow.

    I carry extra boot laces with me as part of my survival gear.

    And I always always have a knife with me. That is the first thing my father taught me.

    Magnesium fires starters are good to have along too.

    As well as a couple of butane lighters. They are more reliable than matches.

    Warmth being our second most important need, next to only the air that we breathe, being able to start a fire in any conditions is a critical survival factor in any game plan.
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  6. Shoobee

    Shoobee Former Guest

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    If we all got hungry enough, we would eat anything that walks, crawls, swims, or flies as well as anything that grows.

    With plants, generally, by boiling them you cook-off any toxins.

    With meats, if you make a soup out of it, and let it boil for about an hour, that will tenderize anything no matter where it came from. The soup broth will have most of the vitamins in it also.

    Of course, on any fresh kill, you can eat that raw, because bacteria has not yet had a chance to contaminate it, and so cooking is not really necessary. Cooking a fresh kill just softens the meat, making it easier to chew.
  7. Shoobee

    Shoobee Former Guest

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Peoples Republik of Kalifornia
    It takes about 6 months at least to produce hard liquor from a mash of any kind.

    The easiest thing to make is vodka, using potato peelings.

    After it sets for several months, you still need to ferment the mash to get the alcohol out of it.

    The effort required is about the same as breeding a lamb to term, and giving it a few weeks to feed on fresh grass. In that case you are turning field grass, together with ram and ewe DNA, into a fresh lamb carcass.

    It all depends on how much the sheep rancher wants the liquor, I guess.
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  8. BlackEagle

    BlackEagle Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2011
    Messages:
    4,324
    Location:
    UK
    I was in a camp in Colorado years ago in which we learned survival skills. We practiced with snares, but built our own slingshots and got squirrels with them; one time we got a porcupine, again with the slingshots. We ate everything we caught. Also learned to eat grasshoppers, red ants (not fire ants), make tea from the fresh shoots of spruce trees, guddle for trout, some edible plants like clover runners and thistle stems among other things. We were going to try rattlesnake once but the boy watching it decided he didn't want any so he let the whole thing fall into the fire.

    We made lean-tos from large sheets of plastic.

    I did a lot of growing up out there and learned a lot about myself and my capabilities.
  9. Frogtop

    Frogtop New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    NE Tenn
    I've been telling you folk about them D**** yankees, look at what they did to our economy in '65. 1865 that is. Actually Jack the Foxfire series was compiled in the southern Appalachians namely Rabun Gap, Georgia. It was started as a project to get the the kids at a boarding school interested in English composition. The teacher, can't remember his name, came up with the idea of getting the kids to go out and talk with the old folk about the "old way" and document what they said. This was done in the early '70"s if memory serves so all of those old folk are sadly gone. My favorites are rifle making including how to make a broach from wood using a piece of an old file for cutting tool for cutting the rifling, and , of course, making a proper still for converting all that useless corn (maise) into a very valuable commodity.
  10. Frogtop

    Frogtop New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    NE Tenn
    Folk around here can turn ground corn into distilled alcohol in a matter of days, week or so at most. If making rot gut and using sugar and malt yeast in warm weather a lot quicker. Having brewer's yeast or some of the beer from a previous run gets you started a lot quicker. Here is a link to a recipe and method for making moonshine: http://www.dcblues.org/sales/cookbook/shine.html
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  11. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    17,600
    Location:
    Australia
    poiteen set the mash for 2 days in a warm spot after 2 day start the still

    start on sunday you'll be plastered by wednsday
  12. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    17,600
    Location:
    Australia
    and tater mash , 2 weeks in the tub ..

    i've built stills for hot and cold mash in a day and been drinking the results a couple after that

    yes if you wish taste and such you set a while and such but you can make grog straight away pretty much from lotsa things

    that frozen OJ concentrate some vegemite some sugar and a warm place to set it then no still needed ( just a cast iron stomach )
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  13. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Oklahoma, USA
    You fella's seem to know awful lot more than the average Joe about makin' "adult beverages!" Glad others have their priorities straight also. I'm thinkin' drinkin' alcohol is gonna be as good a thing to have as ammo, if and when....You'll be able to trade it for anything you want. I'll have to make a lot, though as I'll be using a fair bit for "medicinal purposes" myself. I feel right poorly at times!:D

    P.S. - Jack, you got plans for a proper still? Corn Liquor? I need see if I can actually do it. Never tried. Think I could do it in town ,in an urban setting? I think(have to check) we are allowed to make either 5 or 10 gallons for personal use without pissin' off the revenuers. One of your nice links would be appreciated.
  14. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    17,600
    Location:
    Australia
  15. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Oklahoma, USA
  16. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2010
    Messages:
    17,600
    Location:
    Australia
    No Worries
  17. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    9,717
    Frogtop, the teachers name was Eliot Wiggington and I don't recall the school being a boarding school, just a local high school. I did meet Mr Wiggington and his class one day while in the area and that was the late 1970's. Lots of good info in those books.
    Wiggington pled guilty of child molestation in 1992, left the project and moved to Florida. He did a lot of good in the area and it's a shame he turned out that way.
  18. Frogtop

    Frogtop New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    NE Tenn
    That is a shame re Wiggington. Somehow I had it fixed in my mind that the school was one of those operated by the DAR where the kids were boarded and worked the farm to help support the school. There was one in Grant, AL and seems I remember one being in the mountains of SC maybe over near Wahala. I will have to concede to your first hand knowledge. Yes it was a great project and was done extremely well by the kids. I wonder how much editing Wiggington did? Thanks for the update even though it is sad news.
  19. Frogtop

    Frogtop New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    219
    Location:
    NE Tenn
    Shooter45, just copied this from the Rabun Gap web site:

    "Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School combines its strong academic program, mountain setting, and Presbyterian heritage to inspire young people eager to learn and grow. Living our motto, Work Study Worship, our community nurtures and challenges students from diverse backgrounds as they prepare for college and a lifetime of service.

    Rabun Gap is a college preparatory day and boarding school located in the southeastern United States serving students in grades 6-12.

    The School has an enrollment of 350 talented students with over half being involved in a vibrant boarding program."

    Being on site gave the boarding students time and opportunity to move about the area and talk with the old folk. I also suspect that none of these kids are disadvantaged financially, which would be the case at a DAR school, so that also had the means to travel.
    Last edited: May 18, 2012
  20. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2001
    Messages:
    9,717
    Sorry for the misinformation. It was a long time ago.
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
The Hunting & Fishing Forum Best survival gun, caliber, and action???? May 24, 2012
The Hunting & Fishing Forum My Survival First Aid Kit Contents Jan 25, 2010
The Hunting & Fishing Forum Survival Gear Apr 14, 2009

Share This Page