PC question for you freekazoids.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by fuzebox40, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. fuzebox40

    fuzebox40 Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2010
    Messages:
    1,625
    Location:
    Apple Valley, Ca.
    I’m trying to determine what kind of speeds I’m getting wirelessly vs. my wired connection. I have Verizon and use their provided wireless router which is (G). Now plugged into the router and running XP I go to control panel > network connections > local area connection and next to speed it says 100 Mbps. On a wireless adaptor bedroom PC also running XP it says 54 Mbps. Then on my Entertainment PC in the living room running Win.7 and plugged into a wireless access point it says 100 Mbps. Is that just the max capable speed? And why 54 and 100 on the remote PC’s and not say 54 on both?
    Now when I go to Speekeezy and run their speed test they all seem to get similar speeds of around 20 down and 5 up depending on the city. Is this the actual speed my PC’s are DL and UL at, and surfing or whatever at? Is that good?
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 Guest

  3. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    The speeds you are seeing in the Network Connections are the max capable speeds of the connection (100Mbps for a wired connection, and 54Mbps is pretty standard for a wireless G connection). Note that you will never see those actual speeds, regardless of how fast your upstream connection is. It is a measure of how fast data can get from your computer back to your router, and vice versa.

    The Speakeasy test you ran (or the one previously mentioned at speedtest.net) are your actual internet surfing speeds, and those are reasonable speeds.
  4. Bobitis

    Bobitis Guest

    Freekazoids?

    Ya mean the ones that used ta read The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers? :p

    My download speed is 5.5, and the upload is .6 :(

    But it's screaming fast compared to the one at work. :eek:
  5. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    This probably won't make me popular then...
    [​IMG]
  6. Bobitis

    Bobitis Guest

    :mad: :tapfoot:
  7. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    5,973
    Location:
    Ohio NRA Member
    I had a Q about that on a thread,

    VERY well explained!
  8. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    [​IMG]
  9. henry77

    henry77 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    202
    Location:
    Wiggins, MS
    If more people would run this test, they would have more ethernet ports in their house.

    I have a 100' ethernet cable so I don't have to use wireless. Just run the cable from room to room to my laptop.
  10. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    Agreed, and the more people that would properly wire their new construction homes for low voltage wiring.
  11. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    What can I say? Working for my ISP has it's perks.
  12. Zane71464

    Zane71464 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2009
    Messages:
    5,973
    Location:
    Ohio NRA Member
    ....I'm running off a wireless router....how far do you think one can reach?
    (im running a lonnnnggggg ways)
  13. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    Depends upon a variety of factors. How many walls is it going through, what are they made of, how much wiring is present in the walls, what brand/model is it, what standard is it (a/b/g/n), does the router have any range enhancements, how many antennas does it have, how much interference is present from your neighbors wireless router, what frequency/channel are you using, where is the router located in your house and how high is it, what are the exterior walls and roofing materials made out of, how much solar activity is present at the current time in your location. That's most of the questions concerning the router.

    The list of questions for the wireless card in your computer is even longer. You can also get adapters to run wired internet over your home power lines to get it from one end of the house to the other.

    You can run Cat5e cabling up to 100 meters without a noticeable loss in signal/performance. If your house is more than 100m from end to end, I may want to move in.:p
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  14. mjp28

    mjp28 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,553
    Location:
    anytown, OHIO
    Whenever I get a chance to "pick the brains" of my ISP techs whether on a service call or on the phone I do it, most all of them are really cool about it. [I'M ON CABLE, no modem]

    I asked one to leave me the set up for my Motorola "surfboard" on my favorites list so I could check my Configuration Manager Status Signal Addresses Configuration Logs and all that, a whole lot of information you can use yourself.

    Plus my speed test which both checks DL/UL speeds and does a ping speed time test.

    Ping is a computer network administration utility used to test the reachability of a host on an Internet Protocol (IP) network and to measure the round-trip time for messages sent from the originating host to a destination computer. The name comes from active sonar terminology.

    Ping operates by sending Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo request packets to the target host and waiting for an ICMP response. In the process it measures the time from transmission to reception (round-trip time) and records any packet loss. The results of the test are printed in the form of a statistical summary of the response packets received, including the minimum, maximum, and the mean round-trip times, and sometimes the standard deviation of the mean.

    Ping may be run using various options (command line switches) depending on the implementation that enable special operational modes, such as to specify the packet size used as the probe, automatic repeated operation for sending a specified count of probes, and time stamping options.

    Ping may be abused as a simple form of denial-of-service attack in the form of a ping flood, in which the attacker overwhelms the victim with ICMP echo request packets.
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2012
  15. norahc

    norahc Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2011
    Messages:
    2,650
    Location:
    An hour's drive from the nearest McDonald's
    Ping is a useful tool, as long as you recognize it's limitations. Traceroute is usually better for finding congestion between you and a website. Even better than traceroute is mtr (mytraceroute) for linux/Mac or WinMTR for windows. It combines a ping test with a traceroute test.
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
General Discussion New with questions Jul 22, 2014
General Discussion Felt question Jul 18, 2014
General Discussion A/C question 2005 altima Jun 23, 2014
General Discussion Question about dog's "condition". CAUTION GROSS PICS! Jun 11, 2014
General Discussion Have an "opinion-type" question May 26, 2014

Share This Page