Preperation of fired brass.

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Guest, Feb 24, 2003.

  1. Guest

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    outdoorsman260
    Member
    Posts: 40
    (12/28/02 10:56:26 pm)
    Reply | Edit | Del All Preperation of fired brass.
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    What tools do I need to prepare fired brass for reloading?


    blake.prohosting.com/~redneck4

    1badassmagnum
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    Posts: 35
    (12/29/02 7:16:14 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Preperation of fired brass.
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    I bought a cheap case tumbler from midway for $39.I buy corn cob bedding and crushed walnut shells at feed stores/pet stores for about 40 cents per pound.add a few tablespoons of brass polish,and you have nice bright almost new cases.

    rayra
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 406
    (12/29/02 9:47:42 pm)
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    that's about it.
    some sub-MOA accuracy seekers will de-prime the casings, ream the primer pockets, before tumbling. (I don't bother).
    If your were firing military surplus, you may need a reamer or primer pocket swage to get rid of any primer crimping on the brass.

    Rich

    outdoorsman260
    Member
    Posts: 42
    (12/29/02 10:59:51 pm)
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    Not looking for sub - Moa groups here. I'll be loading for a .260 and a .308 that will be used under 150yds.
    blake.prohosting.com/~redneck4

    AGunguy
    *TFF Staff*
    Posts: 2988
    (12/30/02 1:01:11 am)
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    Caution on the brass polish added to the media, it may contain ammonia which is not good for the brass life...but it do make it shiney.

    GG

    Dave3
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    (12/30/02 10:07:16 pm)
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    Is it necessary to tumble brass? I read that it was optional and not required unless you want pretty ammo. Obviously case inspection is important and may be easier if the brass is polished to a high sheen. I have read that there are large amounts of lead around the media and sifters also. just my 2 pennies.

    rayra
    V.I.P. Member
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    (12/30/02 10:56:26 pm)
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    fouled brass will increase your frequency of jams in any semi-automatic / self-loading application, especially if your firearm has tight tolerances or isn't cleaned well.
    I personally don't care if it's 'pretty', but clean, certainly.

    Rich

    AGunguy
    *TFF Staff*
    Posts: 2995
    (12/31/02 1:17:16 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Preperation of fired brass.
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    Polished clean brass works a lot better in them reloading dies.

    Being retired and in the dead of cold a$$ winter what else have I got to do...I like processing brass...it be fun.

    You should see my book case shelves above my reloading desk, clear plastic containers filled with nice shiney brass waiting to be reloaded when needed.

    Gunguy

    1badassmagnum
    Member
    Posts: 40
    (12/31/02 1:18:19 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Preperation of fired brass.
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    my 50 ae and 440 corbon loads require the use of case lube so tumbling is a neccesary step to remove it.also in developing loads,the shiny new cases make inspection much more accurate at the range.

    MTaylor
    Member
    Posts: 10
    (12/31/02 6:19:25 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Preperation of fired brass.
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    Quote:
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    Obviously case inspection is important and may be easier if the brass is polished to a high sheen.
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    Actually, you want to inspect your cases before you tumble them and after you tumble them.

    Inspection before may reveal a small half moon shaped burn mark indicating a case failure but will be wiped clean by tumbling.

    Inspection after may reveal tumble media lodged in a flash hole. You could tumble with the old primer still in so that the flash hole is cleared by the primer removal. Be sure you dont use any tumble media that is strong enough so as it might cause damage to the case if it did get lodged in the flash hole and was being punched out by the primer removal.






    rayra
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 413
    (1/1/03 12:10:13 am)
    Reply | Edit | Del Re: Preperation of fired brass.
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    Quote:
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    Actually, you want to inspect your cases before you tumble them and after you tumble them.

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    Yeah, but that gets really cumbersome and time-consuming when you load / shoot a few thousand rounds a month.

    One thing I've personally noticed, and subsequently read about elsewhere - a ruptured / split case sounds differest - when you are processing the brass, filtering out the media through a strainer or colander(sp?), you'll hear a distinctly higher-pitched ring from a failed case. (that is unless you've fired those thousands of rounds without proper hearing protection

    And, of course, being observant / vigilant while handling the components throughout the reloading process is the best way, anyway.

    Rich

    Edited by: rayra at: 1/1/03 12:12:23 am
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