Primers

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by Guest, Feb 24, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Cannon450
    Member
    Posts: 1
    (1/2/03 6:14:05 am)
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    What is the difference between magnum and other primers.

    Xracer
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 3390
    (1/2/03 9:10:07 am)
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    Hi Cannon450....welcome to TFF.

    Generally, magnum calibers contain more powder and can be more difficult to ignite. Magnum primers are hotter than the standard primers.

    Here's a small primer on primers: reloadingprimer.freeserve...stom4.html

    Cannon450
    Member
    Posts: 2
    (1/2/03 9:40:29 am)
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    Thanks Xracer....
    If Magnum primer is used when not called for, will it raise
    pressures.

    inplanotx
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 96
    (1/2/03 3:30:38 pm)
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    Hi Cannon450 welcome to TFF.

    The answer to raised pressure with a magnum primer is ...YES. You can experiment with them, however I would drop the powder charge and work my way back up until the desired effect is reached, being pressure or velocity.

    Improvise...Adapt...Overcome

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1673
    (1/2/03 4:35:43 pm)
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    Magnum primers are normally used for hard to ignite powders such as ball powders and the slower burn rate powders.

    As suggested, if contemplating the use of magnum primers, drop back a few grains on the particular load, then work up watching for the normal excessive pressure signs.

    Most loadings work just as well or better without resorting to magnum primers.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"


    Groundhog Devastation
    Member
    Posts: 10
    (1/8/03 8:12:42 pm)
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    In my testing I have found that it seems that magnum primers usually are like adding about 2 grains of powder to a load. If you are going to use magnum primers back your load off and check for signs of pressure. If you have a chronograph you can see the results in your guns. After years of tinkering with reloading and loads I don't use magnum primers in any load anymore. Have never found an advantage to them but then again that's only one man's opinion. GHD

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1751
    (1/8/03 10:03:00 pm)
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    Have to mostly agree with you, Groundhog -

    I've found only the really slow powders (7828, 8700, RL25, etc) need the extra ooomph from a mag primer.

    Interesting article in the Feb. issue of Handloader magazine just received today, regarding primers. According to the article, Remington and CCI's were the mildest, Federal in the middle and Winchester the hottest. In fact, the writer claimed the standard Winchester primer sorta equalled some of the mag primers. Further, that the Federal have a slightly thinner cup and ignite easier with softer hits. I believe all this to be correct as to my own personal findings.

    Benchrest primers are from lots that have proven to be the most consistent with flash temps., not made to more exacting specifications.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"


    oldguide32
    V.I.P. Member
    Posts: 59
    (1/18/03 11:51:48 am)
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    I can agree with Ken and Groundhog. Good advice already posted. I spent a day in Lewiston, Idaho as a guest of the Speer Bros. and the afternoon in the primer factory. This is what I was told by their chemist re primers. (these chemists had started in Utah as scientist with Thiakol Cor. back when we researched solid fuel rockets, then dropped them in favor of licquid fuel. Anyway, their experience w solid fueled rockets brought them up to Richard Speer's plant).

    They said: The compound in the magnum primers was laced with powdered boron (a metal). Upon ignition the flame that was thrust into the powder charge contained these tiny flaming hot bits of boron metal and greatly aided the ignition of the powder.

    When to use? they recommended using mag primers only in two situations. First, the slow-burning coated powders as mentioned by Ken. And secondly if you are shooting/hunting at temperatures below 25 degrees below zero. In 29 years of hunting Montana we had several morning of 25-30 below zero so I suppose we should have used magnum primers. When the day ended they made me a present of 10K primers, 5K of each kind and I followed their advice. I use the mag primers in my 30/338 with 4831, AA8700, and WC860 powders.
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