1. Get Gear'd Up! Enter to WIN $1000 in gear!

    Please Click Here for full details and to enter. You will need to be registered and logged in to view the details and to participate.

    Thanks and good luck to everyone

problem with k98k

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by curyusgrg, Aug 3, 2007.

  1. curyusgrg

    curyusgrg New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Southern Minnesota
    I'm new to the forum and am hoping for some wisdom. I have a sporterized mauser 8mm and when I run the bolt out, it won't go back in. The magazine follower pops up in the way of the bolt. Is the bolt going back too far or is the follower coming up too far? Any help would be appreciated.
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2007
  2. mark_baron

    mark_baron New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Messages:
    112
    Location:
    Tampa Bay Area, Florida
    That's the way mine is. You have to push the follower down with your finger to close the bolt. I'll bet it works fine with cartriges in it. If not then there may be something wrong.
  3. Cury, the '98, along with most military bolt-action rifles, is built to do precisely that. The reason for it is to tell the soldier that he's out of ammo and needs to insert another stripper clip into the magazine. In the heat of battle failing to realize how many rounds a soldier has fired is a very common problem. To close the bolt without ammo in the magazine, you merely need to push the follower down with your thumb or finger far enough that the bolt will slide over the follower.
  4. CCubed

    CCubed New Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    62
    Location:
    Near Harrisburg, PA
    Does the 98k's action do this??? My M48 doesn't, but my FR7 with the 93 Mauser action does. I'm just curious whether or not this is common in 98k rifles, or 98 actions, for that matter, 'cause I know my M48's 98 action doesn't do this.
  5. bunnyhunter12

    bunnyhunter12 New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,090
    Location:
    Newfoundland, Canada
    The solution to this problem is to take your rifle to your local gunsmith/gunshop. There you will find qualified personnel to sell your rifle on consignment and then you can buy an Enfield. This will solve any and ALL problems common to the Mausers. :D :D :D

    I think you'll be pleased with the results. ;)
  6. curyusgrg

    curyusgrg New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    Southern Minnesota
    Thanks everyone. I wondered if that was the case. I discovered my father in law has a czech 8mm and the corner of the follower is ground into a slope to allow it to ride over. I wonder if that was done later to make it easier to use. I'll have to look into an enfield. . . . . unless I want to keep this beautiful rifle. Hmmmm.
  7. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,700
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    The bolt locking back when the magazine is empty is part of the Mauser K98 design for the reason stated above. If yours does that, it is correct. Both mine do it and by inspection I can see that is correct and part of the design.

    LDBennett
  8. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2001
    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Indiana
    Yeah Curious, it's working as designed. All Mauser and Mauser derivatives like the Springfield and Arisakas etc. do that too.

    As for the M48 NOT doing that, I suspect that it SHOULD, and if it doesn't perhaps the follower isn't going up high enough, it is worn, or the follower was modified at some time.


    Most Mannlicher designs, as well as Mosin Nagants, and Enfields don't have this "bolt hold open after the last shot" feature, and I wonder if it just might have something to do with the fact each of those fire rimmed cartridges, while the mausers, Springfields, etc. fire rimless or semi-rimmed cartridges....although I can't figure out WHY....:confused:

    I DO know that I prefer the ones that DON'T hold them open, even if the only advantage I can see is it makes "dry fire" practice a LOT easier....
  9. Polish, the reason is quite obvious: The Russians and the British were both a few electrons short of amperage. Besides, who needs to reload when you can give them "cold steel?" :D ;) :p
  10. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2001
    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Indiana
    Well, you are PARTLY true, and the fact the Russians were LUCKY to issue a Mosin with MORE than 5 rounds, at least early in the war...


    But in the case of the Enfields, when you are loading 10 to start with, it isn't easy to "run dry," the cowardly Boche will be running long before you get to around 7 or 8 accurate shots rapid fire...then you can "top it off" with a 5 round stripper at your leisure and STILL have more rounds available than any junky inaccurate Mauser has when it's FULL....:cool:
  11. Well Polish, I suppose those Limys did need ten rounds to have a chance of hitting anything. The Germans, however, generally taught their recruits to shoot accurately, and with the flawlessly designed and manufactured Mauser '98, accuracy was assured. After all, as I'm sure you will remember, it wasn't the Mauser that went through umpty ump "Marks" trying to get it right. :D ;) :p
  12. bunnyhunter12

    bunnyhunter12 New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,090
    Location:
    Newfoundland, Canada
    That just shows that the Enfield was good enough to be tailored to specific jobs, as the trends of the time detailed, Pistol. Even the Germans knew that the 98 was a lost cause and apart from shortening and litening it so the troops wouldn't have to complain about carrying such a large piece of junk, they just gave up on trying to fix it and soldiered on into oblivion. Maybe they should have left it as a full-sized rifle instead or shortening to Karabiner length. Extra length would have meant extra reach for "pig-sticking" when your five rounds were all used up and the 10rds and rapid fire of the Enfield never gave you a chance to reload. :D:D
  13. polishshooter

    polishshooter Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2001
    Messages:
    8,081
    Location:
    Indiana
    Now PS, I seem to recall there was an 1888 Mauser, a 7mm 1895 Mauser (that MAY have been the only decent one), the Model 96, the Gewehr 98 "Long Rifle", then a couple attempts and versions until the KAR 98, and even THEN it changed a lot at the M38 and M48 et al, until they FINALLY got it "perfected" as the Model 70 Winchester SPORTING rifle....



    And of course the fact that not only did countries that CARRIED Enfields and Mosins in battle manage to WIN a few wars along the way, while nobody who carried a MAUSER can be accused of winning even ONE war, unless the OPPOSITION was also armed with them :cool: ....

    ....Mosins and Enfields were still issued and in military service long AFTER any "battle" Mausers were chopped into sporters or sold as scrap and/or surplus to collectors....:D :D :D
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2007
  14. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    6,700
    Location:
    Hesperia, CA
    Why does a Mauser K98 hold the bolt open on the last shot?

    Take a look at the design of the follower. It is so designed that the bolt will open, dragging on the top of the follower but the bolt will not close after the bolt passes completely over the follower. The follower pops up after the bolt passes the follower and by design the back edge of the follower blocks the bolt from going forward. Just push the follower down with a finger so the bolt will clear the follower's back edge and the bolt will be able to travel forward without stopping.

    Most all the bolt action rifles (old and new designs) that I have seen and inspected use this same design for holding the bolt from closing after the last shot from the magazine. Simple!

    LDBennett
  15. On the contrary, Polish, the Mauser soldiered on for many years after World War II all over Europe, but particularly in Eastern Europe. Indeed, the later pattern Mausers, like the 48, as well as rearsenaled 98ks, served throughout the 1950s and 1960s with many nations. It is also interesting to note that the Russians dumped the Mosins for the SKS as quickly as they could after the war and shipped a great many of them off to their "fraternal socialist allies," which explains why so many of them are still available today. :D ;)
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Curio & Relics Forum action problem - 1903 Winchester .22 auto May 13, 2013
Curio & Relics Forum Steyr M1895 straight pull problem Feb 6, 2010
Curio & Relics Forum Enfield No.4 Mk I* problem! May 30, 2008
Curio & Relics Forum Problem with KAR 98k Sep 24, 2007
Curio & Relics Forum polish tokarev tt33 problem Apr 20, 2007

Share This Page