Progressive press questions?

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by frosty, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. frosty

    frosty New Member

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    I came across a Hornady Projector progressive press. It has 5 die stations. It has no die plate to be removed on top. I was wondering if a press like this is better than one that has a die plate that can be removed. I don't mind taking dies in and out to get set up to load anyway.

    Am I right in thinking that no die plates are better simply because there would be no movement of the plate to consider when the case and the die make contact, especialy for seating and crimping?

    Another question......
    Is a Dillon 650 press built comparitively stronger than say a RCBS 2000? Oh, yeah it makes no difference as to if they are manual or auto indexing, I am just wondering which is better in the long run?

    Sorry guys, I am just trying to ask questions so that I will be happy when I get a progressive press. I don't want to be hassled with the idea of calling the manufacturer for tiny parts that seem to not be able to with stand day to day use, even if there customer service is top notch.

    This brings me to another point I know dillon is a good company and stands behind there product, But why?

    O.K. so they have a No B.S. policy. But what is the point if stuff is always going out on you (plastic parts or aluminium pieces that wear out). It is disturbing to see a "spare parts" area listed in the catalogue for a press that is supposed to be excellent, but tiny faults that need to be addressed add up to alot. Little things that need fixing ( that should last ) make me leary of buying one.

    I want a progressive press but where is the fun if you need parts regardless of a perfect warranty?
  2. Shooter45

    Shooter45 *Administrator* Staff Member

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    Years ago, I was given an OLD Square Deal B Dillon Press. It had some rust amd some parts were missing. I called Dillon. They said send the press to them. I did and three weeks later, I got the press back completely refurbished along with a new set of .38 spl. dies to replace the rusty ones I got with the press.

    Great service and the cost was zero. They even paid the return shipping.

    It just doesn't get much better than that.

    Give Dillon a try.
  3. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Just because a manufacturer stands behing his product does not mean there is something wrong with it. I have a XL650 and would not trade it for the world. Two pins and I'm reloading another caliber!
  4. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Slop in the die plate (tool head) mounting doesn't affect the quality of the finished product. So long as the plate moves the same amount each time you perform an action, it will index into the proper position.

    The reports I've received and read about the Dillon products is that, yes, they do break...at multi-thousand round intervals. The one I'm most familiar with cranked out over 150,000 rounds before needing a replacement part.

    Pops
  5. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    There is no slop in the tool head of my XL650. It is solid when put in and pinned. The toolhead itself is better than an inch and a half thick.
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2004
  6. frosty

    frosty New Member

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    Thanks for your replies,

    I am just having a difficult time deciding which progressive to purchase. I do understand that alot of our TFF members own and love their Dillon presses.

    I have boiled it down to these three choices....

    RCBS PRO 2000 .................... HORNADY LOCK AND LOAD...................... DILLON XL650.
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2004
  7. frosty

    frosty New Member

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    O.K. I have eliminated the Hornady LNL from my choices.


    I read some interesting things about Lee dies barely able to be used in the Hornady press and apparently the priming system leaves a lot to be disired. The bushing method is difficult to use if you have to adjust your dies due to the fact that the bushings slip and move while you are trying to adjust your dies.

    It is now down to the Pro 2000 and the XL 650.
  8. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Buy the damned Dillon and get over it! :D :D :D :D :D :D
  9. tuckerd1

    tuckerd1 Well-Known Member

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    DITTO!!
  10. frosty

    frosty New Member

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    O.K. guys

    I will listen to your sales pitch.

    Sell me the XL650!

    How hard is it to change the shell plate on that monster?

    Oh, and by the way is it hard to reset the powder measure?, I noticed it has no graduations to let you know how much is enough.

    I know I want a 5 station press so I can use a seperate stations to seat and crimp.

    Is it really necessary to have a powder check die or lock out die in a progressive I am leaning toward this idea (Murphy is always around).

    O.k. let me hear what you have to say.
  11. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    I'm not here to sell you a XL650. The machine sells itself as does any Dillon press.


    Very easy as long as you don't lose the little ball in the middle. That's where a spares kit comes in handy.

    I buy a powder measure for each tool head. Set once and forget it!

    Depends on if you like taking loads apart that didn't get any powder. Pretty easy to do without the low powder alarm and powder check die. When you get moving and grooving with your Dillon, sometimes these become real handy. The case feeder is also recommended.

    One other recommendation, buy the strong mounts and the roller handle.


    Now, go buy the damn press and get on with life!
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2004
  12. tuckerd1

    tuckerd1 Well-Known Member

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    I use a 550, which is a 4 die press and I seat and crimp in different dies.

    Station 1 - Size, deprime and prime
    Station 2 - Bell case mouth and charge powder
    Station 3 - Seat bullet
    Station 4 - Crimp

    Just an example that 5 station is not required for this.
  13. frosty

    frosty New Member

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    Plano, I know you have a digital camera. Put it to some good use and post some of what you said.

    Don't worry I am listening very closely.

    Tuc, What about you got any pics of your stuff to go along with you advice.
  14. tuckerd1

    tuckerd1 Well-Known Member

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  15. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Tuck's is for the 550. Here is the 650

    XL650

    Everything you wanted to know. Picture is the same as mine too!

    ;) ;) ;)
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