Qualified Arisaka gunsmiths in Florida...

Discussion in 'Curio & Relics Forum' started by marine6082, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. marine6082

    marine6082 New Member

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    Can anyone point me to a qualified gunsmith(s) in central/south Florida who you'd trust with verifying that an Arisaka 99 is ready to shoot or can make it that way if the guts are good? When I pull the trigger, I want to think that I'm good to go. This was a passdown from an uncle who brought it back. It doesn't look like it's ever been shot. Maybe right out of the armory. Thanks for any help. Steve in Fort Myers, FL
  2. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    no arisaka specific gunsmiths that I know of. But any certified gunsmith should be able to tell if its ok to shoot. Generally speaking, if the barrel is in good shape and the rifling appears sharp and the bolt lugs are intact and their corresponding recesses within the reciever are in good shape and the stock fits tight and isnt cracked, id shoot it. This is exactly what a gunsmith would look for, except he would try to close the bolt on a no go guage first and if it doesnt close he would chamber a go guage and see if it ejects properly. You can get go/no-go guages from brownells or midwayusa. And they would be a tad cheaper than a gunsmith visit;) Although I only charge $25 to diagnose a rifles condition.
  3. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR New Member

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    What JLA said.:D
    Though not common I would look for cracks in the receiver where the bolt handle sits when its closed. I found 1 type 99 like that at a show. The guy selling it didn't even know about it. This usually suggest bigger problems in the receiver lugs and headspace issues. The rearward force of the fired cartridge is no on the lugs like its supposed to but on the bolt handle and receiver cut out.
    Type 99's were well and build besides a head spacing issue and the other things JLA stated, not much can go wrong with them.
  4. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    Quote: "Not much can go wrong with them."

    That's very true. If you want some interesting reading, get gunsmith and author Frank de Haas's book "Bolt Action Rifles" and read the chapter how he and a friend tried to blow up a "bring-back" Type 99. IIRC it was a common type made midway thru WW2. They started out with normal loads, increasing the loads by two or three grains at a time. They had tied the rifle to a truck tire and triggered it by a cord. As the loads increased certain things happened, split in the stock at the recoil lugs, floor plate blown open, etc but no failures of the action. Then they started on pistol powder and at almost a full case of this the barrell was blown forward two or three threads. The action held and nothing had happened that would have injured a shooter. The bolt had to be opened with a mallet. They gave the rifle away to a friend and he rebarreled it and used it.
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

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    Jondar offers a very interesting bit of info. The point is, you would quit shooting due to severe recoil long before you blow your face apart;)
  6. CHW2021

    CHW2021 Member

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    I own and have shot several type 99 rifles. One that I shoot is a sporterized/scoped rifle that is impressive in it's accuracy, ammo can be a problem but it is available (Hornady and others make new rounds). Avoid any WW2 vintage ammo as it will be corrosive primed. Check the production numbers/arsenal marks on the rifle; a little research will give you an idea of production date, this is important as the later (last ditch) rifles were not of the same quality as earlier war production and pre-war rifles. Additionally, as a safety precaution just look at the barrel and double check that it was not replaced as many were after they were brought home as souveniers. Look here http://www.surplusrifle.com/ for additional info, it is a start. Have fun.

    C.W.
  7. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    Quote: "The later (last ditch) Arisakas were not of the same quality as the earlier or pre-war .........

    Yes, the last ditch rifles had actions of cast steel as opposed to one milled from a billet of quality steel. One way of identifying them is that the last ditch models had the tang cast as one with the action.
  8. CHW2021

    CHW2021 Member

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    Question to Jondar, the sporterized Arisaka that I shoot more often has no evidence of a mum on the reciever and no arsenal markings, it is not impossible that they were removed and polished out BUT there is no distortion or markings in the metal to show they were ever there. Were any Arisaka rifles released to the civilian market or exported without these marks?
    Any ideas??
  9. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    CHW2021 - As I understand it from smarter people than me, the battlefield pick-ups which were brought back by the people who picked them up had the chrysanthemum (sp?) still on. When the war ended the agreement was that the Emperor's insignia (the mum) would be removed, and I doubt that any rifles which went thru the armourers escaped. I brought back from Korea a Type 99 which was made at the arsenal In Jensin, S. Korea and it has no mum on it, just enough to tell there was one there at one time.

    I suppose that a thorough job of removing the mum may give the same effect as what you describe. Tho all the ones I have seen have had some remnants of the mum left, enough that you could tell one existed there at one time. Pictures would certainly help. Hope this helps.
  10. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    Follow up - The arsenal and other markings that should be on top left rear of receiver could have been polished off by whomever sporterized the rifle. It seems impossible that this could be done, leaving no evidence, but someone on the forum, I think it involved a Model 1911 Colt USP said that if could be done without too much trouble. After reading his explanation I'm inclined to agree with him.
  11. marine6082

    marine6082 New Member

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    I'd like to thank all those who replied. We're gonna shoot it with some loads I'm making up: Norma 7.7 cases, 37 grains of H4895, and Hornady 3131 174 grain bullets. I have another question: Can anyone tell me about the rear sights and how to use the numbering system on the flip-up? We're going out to a range with 100yd and 200yd distances and I'd like to find a good starting point to set the slide. Any info you can give would be appreciated.
  12. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    Marine 6082 - The load you mention looks good. I use the Norma cases also but use IMR 4064 mainly because it works well in all my rifles from the .220 Swift up thru the .30-06. As to the rear sight, I haven't been able to find any technical material on settings. I suppose the range is measured off in meters. With the tangent flat forward and using the aperture in that position my rifles prints about two inches high of a 4" bullseye using a six o'clock hold at a hundred yards. I don't hunt with it so haven't tested it at longer ranges. I suppose (always a bad idea) that with the tangent straight up and using the aperture in the slider would be the 200 meter setting, and raising the slider up to the marked places would be indicative of the range it would be set for. Both my rifles have maximum settings of 1500 meters. Hope this helps.
  13. marine6082

    marine6082 New Member

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    Thanks, Jondar. We'll try that for the rear sight and see where we end up on the 100 yd range. Maybe logic will enter the picture and we can try things based upon the first couple of shots. I'll keep looking for info and post whatever I find out. Tks again.
  14. marine6082

    marine6082 New Member

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    Also, ours is up to 15, going side to side even and odd numbers. Let's see what happens at 200yds.
  15. 56/50

    56/50 New Member

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    I've got a Type 30,(yes 30 not a 38) with the Chrys. all markings and an original Type 30 bayonet and sling!! I can't find much info. on this rifle!! My other two one is a Type 99 7.7mm that had a mono-pod and aircraft sight and sling and the other is a Type 38 6.5mm with scope and has been sporterized (regrettably) but very well done! The 99 has had the Chrys. ground off but the 38 has script but never had a Chrys.!!! Am still researching these rifles, what an experience, then again that's the fun of owning these oldtimers and giving them a proper home!! Joe
  16. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean when you say your Type 38 never had a mum originally on it. While the only Arisakas I own are Type 99's, I see 38's at gun shows and read the descriptions of them on gun auctions. I have never seen one without the mum or remains of one. Is it possible that whomever sporterized the rifle polished off the mum so neatly that it appears to never have been on it? A poster some time back said that his sporterized Arisaka (can't remember 38 or 99) not only did not have a mum but no markings on the rear left of the receiver as to arsenal or any of the other markings.
  17. 56/50

    56/50 New Member

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    My 38 sporter is the one with no noticable Chris. and could have been polished off, but I've been a machinist for over 40 yrs and it's the best polishing job I've ever seen!! But it is possible!! It does have Kokura markings on the left side of the receiver and the proper script on top bellow where the Chris. should be, plus the barrel has had no sights on it!! Joe
  18. jondar

    jondar New Member

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    I worked at a job in a midwestern city where down the street from where I worked there was a gun store, mostly used guns, and militaria. I knew the man who owned it very well and he called me one day and said come down soon as you can. He showed me an Arisaka sporter, beautiful curly maple stock with monte carlo cheek piece, IIRC the barrel was stamped .257 Roberts. Had Weaver mounts but no scope. He asked only $150 but I was strapped and couldn't buy it. Looking back now, I wish I had.

    What is the barrel length on yours? I think the barrel on the one I missed was 20 inches. One beauty!
  19. 56/50

    56/50 New Member

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    Mine is 20 7/8 Inches!! Joe
  20. lanceb152

    lanceb152 New Member

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    try coate of arms n.ft.myers good luck
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