question 30-06 ammo military grade

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by targetacqmgt, Sep 26, 2012.

  1. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    The question here is does military surplus 30-06 ammo "fit and fire safely" in a civilian 30-06????

    My intent is to fire it out of a Rossi wizard 30-06
  2. B27

    B27 New Member

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    Yes.

    This cartridge can be referred to as....

    .30-06

    .30 Cal. (military nomenclature)

    Or- M2 (this being the 150 gr. milspec .30-06)

    They are all safe to fire in commercial .30-06 rifles. :)

    But, a great deal of milsurp .30-06 is corrosive. So take the proper measures after firing.
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  3. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Thanks I have a couple of mosins so I know I must clean throughly after firing corrosive ammo. Most of what I will buy will go into storage.
  4. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    good thinkin ;)
  5. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Mil surp .30-'06 is getting scarce as it was being phased out in the U.S. as early as 1957. If you plan on long term storage, make sure the age. I have fired ammo that was 100+ years old and most fired, but I wouldn't store anything over about 10 years old and preferably new ammo. Unless you rotate your store, it will just get older and older. Starting with ammo that is already 60 years old is not a good idea.

    Jim
  6. jack404

    jack404 Former Guest

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    see i got a heap of 1916 left but getting through it , then theres the 1917 and 1919 stuff

    ( all .303 ball ) , i do sell some and its still very good ammo ( if the case was intact , i've had a few opened and corroded lots and ended up tossed the lot each time )

    and i've a pile of 1992 30-06 ( malaysian navy ammo ) but i'll get through that before the 1917 stuff ;)
  7. Oldeyes

    Oldeyes Member

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    I was surprised to find a lot of the surplus WWI .30-06 ball ammo loaded with a bundle of long threads of a stick cordite type propellent which extended from the back of the bullet back to the primer. We lit some of the cordite threads in an ash tray and it burned almost like a small bit of C4. The 90 year old stick propellent looked strange as all get out, but it worked just fine in our range shooting applications. Most surprising.
  8. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    That is right interesting care to give country of origin and date of mfg??
  9. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Yeah Jack the mil surp that is fairly new I think? is coming from places like malaysia. Our Civilian Marksmanship Program does not have much milsurp left and it goes fast. last time I looked for A CMP 1917 springfield - nada nyet rifles.
  10. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Good points, I have a Rossi wizard and would NOT like to have an old round blowup heating the barrel up with previous rounds.

    I had a Mk19 40mm rd denonate in the feed tray in Nam-propellant charge only. NOT an experience I would want to repeat.
  11. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    brit ammo commonly used cordite.. I've seen plenty of 303 cordite loaded ammo.

    as for 30-06.... i have and have seen lots of 60's ? era greek milsurp..

    have heard horror stories about some 30-06.. perhaps korean? that was have case head separations like crazy.. anyone else hear about this?
  12. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    All I know is that the U.S. never used cordite, but .30-'06 ammo made elsewhere might have been loaded with it.

    The concern with old ammo is not that it is going to blow up the gun, it is that it won't fire. If the S really does HTF, you don't want ammo that is dead on arrival. Plus, why stock up on corrosive primed ammo when non-corrosive is available. But the old corrosive primers were pretty stable, which is why they survived through WWII.

    Jim
  13. B27

    B27 New Member

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    Nope on the Korean case ruptures....but my buddy loaned me his repro 1903A4and that rascal just eats up the old Greek M2 on 5 round strippers in bandoleers. :)
  14. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    i have a few hundred in greek milsurp in the SHTF cave, and have another couple hundred empties from said greek that I've prepped and have been reloading.
  15. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Point taken thanks Jim
  16. 3/2 STA SS

    3/2 STA SS Active Member

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    I have .30-06 that I know is well over 60-70 years old and fires great...
  17. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Non-corrosive primers came into general use in the early to mid-1930's and there was a lot of pressure on the military to adopt them, especially since the semi-auto rifle then coming into production would benefit from them. Army Ordnance resisted (and took a lot of heat), claiming that the stability of the new primers had not been proven. With the need to store millions of rounds of ammunition for indefinite periods in varying climates, the Army felt it could not authorize use of untried primers. The results were that the new M1 rifle had a gas cylinder and piston head made of stainless steel (then a rare and expensive material), and that millions of WWII GI's had to clean their rifles.

    The M1 carbine was the exception. The designer (Williams) and first manufacturer (Winchester) told the Army that unless non-corrosive primers were used, the carbine would rapidly turn into a large paperweight. The Army made an exception, since they considered the carbine a wartime expedient and not a "real" battle rifle.

    But those Ordnance folks were right. Not long ago I decided to shoot up some 8mm Mauser ammo made in Canada in 1940 for the British (it was used in their tank machineguns) that had non-corrosive primers. All of it either had hang fires or didn't fire at all. But .30-'06 GI ammo from the same period, loaded with the old FA-70 corrosive primers, fired every time.

    More recent non-corrosive primers appear to be very stable, but those early mixtures just weren't.

    Jim
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012
  18. targetacqmgt

    targetacqmgt New Member

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    Revisiting storage times: My intention is to rotate ammo and store for no longer than 5 years (which is IMO the time when it all falls apart and all my ammo will be needed).
  19. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    I sincerely hope you are wrong and it never "all falls apart."

    Jim
  20. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    the writing is on the wall and it's already falling apart!
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