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Question ? Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Discussion in 'General Military Arms & History Forum' started by Guest, Feb 23, 2003.

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    Tac401
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    Posts: 519
    (4/3/01 4:55:49 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Question ? Revocation of the Edict of Nantes
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hi, this is tac's wife Carla, I was wondering if anyone
    can give me information on the Revocation of Edict of Nantes of France.
    My 7th great Grandfather who was a Huguenot in the 1600's escaped this from France and went to the West Indies.
    I am interested in finding out exactly what this was.
    His son, Etienne Bourdette came to New York in 1686 and settled in what is Fort Lee, New Jersey.
    He had 3 sons of which one was named Peter who is my 5th great Grandfather.
    Peter married a full blooded Lenni Lenape indian lady, Rachel and they had 8 children.
    Peter and Rachel had an Inn and were great patriots of the Revolutionary War and very good friends of George Washington. He stayed several times at their Inn.

    If you would like to get the full story, go to-

    www.fortlee.com then click on "What's New"
    then click on "Updated History".

    Thanks in advance for any info you might be able provide
    on the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

    Carla





    Edited by: Tac401 at: 4/3/01 5:19:41 pm

    obelix2
    Registered User
    Posts: 57
    (4/3/01 9:42:30 pm)
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    Carla, I approach this with some trepidation and only because no one else would have the gaul. What we're talking about here may be the most important theme running through over a century and a half of French history.

    Decades of acrimony following the Reformation culminated in the massacre of French Protestants on St. Bartholomew's Day, 1572. The nominal leader of the Protestants, Henri de Bourbon, survived it and became, some 20 years later, Henri IV. To assume the throne he had to convert to Catholicism. He is supposed to have said, "Paris vaut bien une messe." I do not know whether this is so.

    Henri remained a Protestant at heart, however, and proclaimed the Edict of Nantes in 1598 -- a broad manifesto of religious toleration and almost a grant of autonomy to French Protestants in certain places. It seems to have worked: He was much loved by all the French, both Catholic and Protestant. Except, perhaps, for the one who assassinated him in 1610.

    This passed the crown to his 9-yr-old son, Louis XIII, and the actual power, eventually, to Cardinal Richelieu. Now Richelieu had reasons of religion, but much more importantly, reasons of state, for wishing to undermine Henri's edict. Throughout his tenure and that of his successor, Cardinal Mazarin, those rights were eroded, and sometimes exploded (You may remember the fall of Rochelle (162 from The Three Musketeers).

    Finally, in 1685, Louis XIV announced that, since religious prejudice no longer existed in France, the Edict was no longer necessary and ought to be revoked. No persecution of Protestants was to follow.

    Persecution of Protestants followed. Though Protestants were for some reason legally forbidden to leave the country, the practical effect was to force the emigration of thousands of them both to neighboring Protestant states and to the Americas, the latter including some of your ancestors.

    It is said that some provinces lost virtually their entire populations. It is certain that France lost a great many of her most highly skilled and industrious citizens and gained nothing in return. Comparisons with the Germany of the 30s come to mind.

    That's the best I can do while still leaving some room in the computer. I hope it helps.





    Tac401
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    (4/3/01 11:06:44 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Question ? Revocation of the Edict of Nantes
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    Obelix,

    Thanks so much for the info, I have been trying to
    find out what I could on this for quite some time.

    Thanks again, Carla

    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 168
    (4/4/01 9:28:44 pm)
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    What he said...

    If it didn't involve a war I liked I slept through that class I think...Now about that time Gustavus Adolphus was doing strange things with artillery a few hundred miles and years northeast of there I think...

    obelix2
    Registered User
    Posts: 64
    (4/5/01 7:47:54 am)
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    Right, the Thirty Years War, a fine example of how to utterly devastate Germany without a single B17 or Lancaster.

    Gustavus Adolphus brought warfare into the 17th century not only with field artillery but through the use of infantry that could run circles around the formidable but unwieldly Spanish tercios and with modern cavalry tactics he had learned from the Poles -- those lances and sabres were a mite more effective back then.

    After his death, though, things began to swing back toward the Hapsburgs, causing the French to enter the war -- on the Protestant side! That's what I mean by reasons of state.

    Tac401
    Administrator
    Posts: 533
    (4/5/01 4:55:12 pm)
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    ezSupporter
    Re: Question ? Revocation of the Edict of Nantes
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    Pretty interesting fella's, this forum was a great
    idea Polish, glad you suggested it.

    Tac
    The Firearms Forum Vietnam Memories Bulletin Board Contact Administrator

    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 177
    (4/5/01 11:12:50 pm)
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    Whenever you can have a "Personal" or "family" brush with History like you had, Carla, it really is a neat experience, isn't it?

    One of mine was in college, Freshman Western Civ, Second Semester. But first...

    My Father was NOT "educated." 2nd Generation Polish, His Father born "on boat" on way over in 1890s.

    Dad had to "go to work" after 8th grade to help his family through the Depression. So, no formal education.

    BUT, he always told an old family story, of how our anscestors, peasants, fought the Prussians and the Russians to a standstill with nothing but pitchforks and scythes.
    How one polak is worth 2 Germans, 3 Russians. Told the story over and over, ever since I was a kid, the kind you like to ignore from your parents. BORING.

    Flash back to 1976. Professor talking about "2nd Partition of Poland." 1795. Polish peasants revolt, overthrow their foreign "King," Thaddeus Kosciousko, hero of OUR Revolution, organizes the peasants into an army, teaches them to use modified pitchforks and scythes with the blades turned like pikes and bayonets and stand against Cavalry, and close with the Infantry. "Fight the best armies of the Prussians and the Russians to a standstill..."

    I closed my notebook, and closed my eyes and leaned back.
    Been there, DONE that.

    It was a great feeling...

    Edited by: polishshooter at: 4/7/01 8:18:10 pm

    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 178
    (4/5/01 11:15:10 pm)
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    And obelix, nice touch with "no one else would have the...gaul."

    Great one!!!!

    obelix2
    Registered User
    Posts: 74
    (4/7/01 4:04:59 pm)
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    I had a brilliant answer here, easily able to rival Moby Dick in AmLit texts. But the machine took it away (the machine and me).

    Precis: My father could have been a fine writer. He was, in fact, in the letters he sent back to my mother from various camps. But he had no Education: at 13 he was forced from various newspaper corners (for which he had to fight) to work to support his eight brothers and sisters.

    My Polish grandmother (whose English I only pretended to understand) had had the ill-judgment to marry an Irishman, whose monumental Drunks are to me only legendary, for he died when my father was six, because this grandmother insisted he leave his barroom job to take up healthful work in the sewers.

    I have already given more of my personal background than anyone else on the board and will stop here.

    The only thing I ask is that no one regard this as self-pity. I am long past that, as I think you are.

    Other side of family follows, but only if all watchers are so incorrect as to be objective.



    polishshooter
    Senior Chief Moderator Staff
    Posts: 206
    (4/7/01 7:31:46 pm)
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    I uderstand you better, Ob.

    My wife is part Irish, and with my Polish temper and stubbornness and her Irish temper and stubborness, (it's a WONDER we haven't killed each other yet, much less stayed happily married for 20 years!) my kids have the best AND worst of both traits!!!

    Actually, when you really think about it, there's not alot of difference between Irish and Polish "common folk!" They both got dominated by strong "neighbors," resent the bully to the east, and like to rumble, even with each other, and fight for lost causes and charge horses at windmills! (Or tanks.)

    Except for the shamrocks and kielbasa, and that the Poles like the wodka and the Irish like the Whiskey! (Actually, I prefer the brown stuff myself, and my wife rarely drinks...)

    (And the Polish made do with turnips when the potatoes didn't grow.)
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