Reloading question

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by AR guy, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. AR guy

    AR guy Member

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    As I stated before in some of my other post I'm new to this so I have another question. I have a rcbs rock chuckler kit and it came with the Speer loading book #14. I've been reading the book and what i get is this. Tell me if I'm right or wrong. Since I got the Speer book. And with that data that it gives me, I have to use Speer bullets. It also says to use cci primers so I have to use that brand too. And the powder that's the only choices it gives. I can pick any powder listed right? And if I say wanna use hornady bullets I need a hornady load book right? Or can I use any brand bullets? I just can't go to the store and pick any bullets, any primers and any powder and reload. Well what I'm trying to ask is do I have to stay with the bullets the load book gives? And if I want to use other bullets I have to get data for that specific bullet? Right or wrong?
  2. 1LoneWolf75

    1LoneWolf75 New Member

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    Pick yer powder and yer bullet. As far as I know you don't have to stay with Speers brands. Just stay in the load ranges set by Speer. I do know that they test a wider range of powders than some of the other guys. I personally know 2 reloaders other than myself. They both use the Speer book and Sierra bullets in the style and weight that they like. I used Lee info and Sierra. Everyone I know uses CCI but I have read good on other brands here. Speer recommends CCI because they started together accordin to the history in #11. They test with what they make. In my opinion that makes sense. Now Alpo or Jack or JLA will probably come along and tell you more and probably in a better or easier to understand way. I just started reloadin this year, so my knowledge is what I have read and heard.
  3. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

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    No, you don't have to use the brand primer that they used. That's just what they used to reach the results they printed. You can use any brand you want. Just stay with the same type for now, As for bullets, somewhat the same thing. I use a lot of Rem and Win bullets, neither publish data so I look for something similar and use that data starting low and working up. Powder, stick with what the book calls for depending on what speed you want to achieve. This probably confused you even more, I hooe not.
  4. AR guy

    AR guy Member

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    When you say stay in the ranges for the powder do you mean the start charge and the max charge? Just don't go under or over for that specific powder correct. And thanks ill probably have more questions comming so keep a eye out and thanks again for the advice.
  5. hunter29180

    hunter29180 Active Member

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    you are getting it figured out now AR guy..you just choose the bullet say if speer calls for example a Speer 110 grain boattail and you have a Nosler 110 Balistic tip Varmint...then its apples to apples..same with primers,,CCI small rifle is same as Winchester small rifle. you will develope preferances as you go..CCI is a good one to start with but sometimes they are not in stock, dont be afraid to try another brand.

    Powder is a horse of a diffrent stripe..if it calls for a certain powder, then use that powder. use the ranges given, but since you are just starting out start at or near the min starting grains, make 10 or so, not too many, go shoot them..keep track of your obersvations. recoil, accuracy, any problems ect. then go back and reload a few more just a little more powder say 1/2 grainand repeate! you will find a set that performs well for that rifle. mark it down and load up your brass! its sometimes a pains taking process but the dividans are well worht the process!

    hopefully some of the real RELOADERS will chime in with more sage advice...they have a lot of tips that are well worth reading!!

    GOOD LUCK!!
  6. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

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    Pick your bullet, pick your powder. Niw load up 5 or 10 begining with the start powder charge. Go shoot them and see how they pattern. Then load up 5 or 10 more but increasing the charge weight by .5 grains and see how they work. Keep doing this until you find what works but DO NOT EXCEED MAXIMUM.
  7. AR guy

    AR guy Member

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    Thanks a lot guys its really appreciated.
  8. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

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    If you have troubles, get confused or just aren't sure..... ask. We'll all do what we can to get you straight and keep you safe.
  9. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    AR guy:

    After some time at reloading the advice given above is OK but for your first reloading experience and until you truly understand reloading and have some experience at it, I suggest you follow the recipes in the reloading manual you have EXACTLY. There is nothing more frustrating then to have trouble reloading and you have no reference point, like the data and components suggested in the manual. If you just have to have someone else's bullets then get their reloading manual.

    But some manuals are a bit more universal, like the Hodgdon manual. It usually gives ranges of bullet weights and load data for that weight range of bullets and not specific bullets. That data is safe to use on your bullet of choice but follow the rest of the recipe in the Hodgdon reloading manual.

    You can vary things as you learn more and get practice reloading but to start I say follow the reloading manuals exactly if you expect to minimize problems with reloads.

    It is not that the advice given before is wrong as it is not, but to assure success initially in reloading you need to start following a recipe. There will be plenty of time later to vary everything when you know what you can safely change from the reloading manuals.

    Anyway that is my opinion based on 25+ years of reloading and after having made all the mistakes along the way.

    LDBennett
  10. howlnmad

    howlnmad Well-Known Member

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    I agree with everything that LD has posted.

    LD,

    What I was getting at in my first post was that there is really no reason that if he doesn't have CCI SR primers available that he can't still use a Rem SR primer in place. I'm not saying to use SRM in place of a SR. Sometimes some components just aren't available
  11. AR guy

    AR guy Member

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    Ok thanks, I will definitely follow the givin recipes. I will go get more loading books too, just in case I have to vere off of a recipe due to availability of supplies. Thanks again.
  12. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    i LIKE to have a manual for the projectiles I'm using.

    very nice to read the # off the box and flip tot hat page in the relaod section and get exact data.

    that said. if I am relaoding something needing 180g spbt projectiles.. and i got sirerra and other.. i don't feel too bad about interchanging them as long as i am at same weight and geometry.

    now on special projectiles like barnes and nosler.. and any like hornady with balistic tips.. I liek the exact load data from the projectile maker.

    primers.. I stay with type, not brand specified.

    ie.. large or small / rifle / pistol / standard / magnum.

    powder.. i stick to what the load data shows...

    soundguy
  13. LDJ

    LDJ Member

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    There is a small caliber specific manual that is sold at cabelas and maybe at other sports stores. I bought one at cabelas for 45 colt that have all the major bullet manufacture's in it. I think the 45 LC book had like 600 different bullets, powders and loads in it. Making it easy to compare.

    I'm not saying this can replace the full manuals, but I have bought them for each caliber I reload and they are VERY helpful.

    It does not have like a, Berry's in it but it is easy to find a bullet like Berry's.
  14. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    more info NEVER hurts.. :)
  15. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    My opinion is that if you use a 150 grain bullet, NO MATTER WHO MAKES IT, it is still a 150 grain bullet, If you use a Large Rifle Primer, NO MATTER WHO MAKES IT, it is still a Large Rifle Primer. As already said above somewhere, don't change the brand of powder, if it calls for Varget powder don't use IMR 7828.
  16. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    imho.. bullet CAN mke a difference.

    those with balistic tips.. or sectionals like barnes.. or cast.. some significant differences...
  17. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    How is it going to make a difference? If a bullet is 150 grains it is 150 grains, whether it is ballistic tip, or FMJ, or soft point!! I'm not saying there is not going to be a slight variance of weights in a box of bullets, I am saying that if you buy a box of 150 grain Hornady A-max bullets, or a box of 150 grain Sierra BTHP bullets, or a box of 150 grain Speer FMJ bullets you would use the loading data for a 150 grain bullet.
  18. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    While I do agree that there is little difference in brand of case or primer, there CAN be differences in bullets for a given weight though.
    Design (round nose, flat nose, spitzer, hollow point, secant ogive, cosine ogive, etc) can be a big factor in recommended seating length.
    But the most important factor is the bullet material. Yes, most gilding-metal jacketed lead-core bullets of a similar style can be used with matching data regardless of maker, but a solid copper design like the Barnes' TSX/TTSX/Solid WILL react differently than "traditional" jacketed bullets and you should never use jacketed-bullet data for those types of bullets.
    So while many times you can, there are some instances where it can be dangerous to substitute components. Not something for a new guy to be tinkering around with until they've got some experience under their belt.

    I agree 100% with LD's post above. For a new reloader it's always best to stick with the recipe from which ever manual they're using. Don't deviate from that until you've got a good understanding on what's going on, what are the differences in the component that you're substituting, and what works with each particular cartridge/rifle combination.



    And back to the OP...
    The same also applies with "sharing" pet loads. Just because I've got a load that works in one of my rifles doesn't mean it'll work in another rifle that I or somebody else own in that caliber.
    Someone else's pet loads can be used as additional info on what to try, but it should always be cross-referenced against data published by one of the major manufacturers.
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  19. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    The all-in-one manuals that LDJ is mentioning here are put together by Loadbooks USA.
    http://www.loadbooks.com/

    They reprint data from most of the major manufacturers and are a good data source if you're only loading for a few calibers. Get one manual for each caliber you're loading and you've got all the major data sources in one book.
    The only problem I have with them is that some of the data does get outdated in them. As the manufacturers update their data, it might not make it to the guys at Loadbooks as quickly. Otherwise, they're an excellent concept.


    And don't overlook hitting up the websites for the different manufacturers too. Most of them have a lot of info and data posted on their websites too.
  20. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    GM.. bindernut touched on what i was getting at. some special projectiles.. like the barnes i mentioned are sufficiently different than a fmj type that you may want to stick to their relaod date specifically in some cases.

    I do agree that a 150gr sierra spbt fmj and a ?hornady? 150gr spbt fmj can generallybe run on the same data.. etc..
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