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Reloading question

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by AR guy, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    imho.. bullet CAN mke a difference.

    those with balistic tips.. or sectionals like barnes.. or cast.. some significant differences...
  2. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    How is it going to make a difference? If a bullet is 150 grains it is 150 grains, whether it is ballistic tip, or FMJ, or soft point!! I'm not saying there is not going to be a slight variance of weights in a box of bullets, I am saying that if you buy a box of 150 grain Hornady A-max bullets, or a box of 150 grain Sierra BTHP bullets, or a box of 150 grain Speer FMJ bullets you would use the loading data for a 150 grain bullet.
  3. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    While I do agree that there is little difference in brand of case or primer, there CAN be differences in bullets for a given weight though.
    Design (round nose, flat nose, spitzer, hollow point, secant ogive, cosine ogive, etc) can be a big factor in recommended seating length.
    But the most important factor is the bullet material. Yes, most gilding-metal jacketed lead-core bullets of a similar style can be used with matching data regardless of maker, but a solid copper design like the Barnes' TSX/TTSX/Solid WILL react differently than "traditional" jacketed bullets and you should never use jacketed-bullet data for those types of bullets.
    So while many times you can, there are some instances where it can be dangerous to substitute components. Not something for a new guy to be tinkering around with until they've got some experience under their belt.

    I agree 100% with LD's post above. For a new reloader it's always best to stick with the recipe from which ever manual they're using. Don't deviate from that until you've got a good understanding on what's going on, what are the differences in the component that you're substituting, and what works with each particular cartridge/rifle combination.



    And back to the OP...
    The same also applies with "sharing" pet loads. Just because I've got a load that works in one of my rifles doesn't mean it'll work in another rifle that I or somebody else own in that caliber.
    Someone else's pet loads can be used as additional info on what to try, but it should always be cross-referenced against data published by one of the major manufacturers.
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  4. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    The all-in-one manuals that LDJ is mentioning here are put together by Loadbooks USA.
    http://www.loadbooks.com/

    They reprint data from most of the major manufacturers and are a good data source if you're only loading for a few calibers. Get one manual for each caliber you're loading and you've got all the major data sources in one book.
    The only problem I have with them is that some of the data does get outdated in them. As the manufacturers update their data, it might not make it to the guys at Loadbooks as quickly. Otherwise, they're an excellent concept.


    And don't overlook hitting up the websites for the different manufacturers too. Most of them have a lot of info and data posted on their websites too.
  5. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    GM.. bindernut touched on what i was getting at. some special projectiles.. like the barnes i mentioned are sufficiently different than a fmj type that you may want to stick to their relaod date specifically in some cases.

    I do agree that a 150gr sierra spbt fmj and a ?hornady? 150gr spbt fmj can generallybe run on the same data.. etc..
  6. gdmoody

    gdmoody Moderator Supporting Member

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    We will just have to agree to disagree on this particular thing.
  7. soundguy

    soundguy Well-Known Member

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    you mean that .. say.. specifically for a barnes bullet.. you find it's loading data differs in no way from any other standard jacketed projectile?

    if so.. ok.. we can agree to disagree.
  8. BobMcG

    BobMcG Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    With you 100% on this LD.

    Absolutely! The more information the better. Like soundguy, I too like to have the manuals for the bullets I use.
    BTW: The loadbooks mentioned are really good sources; I have one for every caliber (I load) I can get one for.

    A fact. Bullet design, shape, construction and material can effect pressure without a change in bullet weight. (Actually, so can changing from one primer brand to another.)
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