Reloading ?

Discussion in 'The Ammo & Reloading Forum' started by wade7575, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. wade7575

    wade7575 New Member

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    Reloading or in this case loading,this may sound stupid but I was wondering if you can buy 22 rimfire slugs and shells that are preprimed to allow a person to load there own,I know I would like to be able to do this myself but I'm not sure if this can be done.
  2. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

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    The short answer is no
  3. wade7575

    wade7575 New Member

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    That's I think alot of people would load there own if it could be done cheaper,I like the pride in knowing I may it myself.
  4. cakes

    cakes New Member

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    You can reload most rimfire cartridges. I don't know anyone who does. For .22s, it is not worth the trouble because the ammo is so inexpensive and available.

    If you wanted to make a custom load you could just pull some bullets, dump out the powder, and start from there. I wouldn't use a kinetic bullet puller on a rimfire, though.
  5. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro New Member

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    cakes:

    Just curious, how would you reprime rimfire cartridges? I'm not familiar with any techniques or tools to to do this with. I also don't know of anywhere that sells priming compound for this purpose. I could be wrong, but I'm going to say this can't be done by the average reloader.

    Even if you did invest the time to pulling a .22 cartridge apart, I don't know of any dies to press them back together with. Couple this with the fact that most .22lr's are crimped and it seems like that would ruin the soft lead bullet when pulling them out. I guess you could cast your own .22 slugs if you were really a die hard, but .22 ammo is so cheap I can't possibly figure how it would be worth it to try.

    The match .22lr stuff is pretty good overall, so if accuracy is what your looking for I would try some of that.
  6. wade7575

    wade7575 New Member

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    I knew that repriming the brass would not be possible,I was thinking and hoping that even if you got preprimed shell's and just toss them once they have been fired.
  7. cakes

    cakes New Member

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    Please note: I am not actually suggesting that this be done, or that it is a good idea.

    Many a .22lr case has been reloaded. The easy way to re-prime is to put a little of your favorite recipe of priming compound into the clean empty case. Spinning the case will cause the priming compound to fill the rim(centrifugal force). The striker will have to hit the rim in a different spot than it did previously because the rim is not resized. Resizing a case is as easy as pushing it into a hole drilled in a piece of wood.


    The good old days weren't always so good, and there are some old timers that will tell you that they brought home many a meal with reloaded .22 ammo.

    AGAIN: I am not recommending anyone reload .22lr ammo. I'm just saying that it isn't as hard as many think it is. It is definitely not worth it in this day and age. Some serious S would have to hit some serious F before I started reloading .22lr.
  8. cakes

    cakes New Member

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    As for priming compounds, I do not think this is the place for this discussion, but it is more readily available than most would imagine.
  9. Gearheadpyro

    Gearheadpyro New Member

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    I suppose you could use nearly any form of percussion detonated explosive compound in an absolute bind. The problem there would be with the stability of the compound.

    Lead styphnate was chosen as the priming compound of choice due to several factors, including reliability and long term stability. Other compounds may or may not work as well.

    The most obvious choice for a replacement that I know of would be A.P. (if you don't know what this is you don't need to). The biggest problem with that is that it goes bang when it's not supposed to pretty frequently.
  10. medalguy

    medalguy Member

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    My dad told me of a neighbor of his who way back during the depression (the last one) reloaded some .22 ammo. He was a pharmacist and I suppose knew something about chemicals back then. Not recommended today, for sure!
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