Remington 1917

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by DJC, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. DJC

    DJC New Member

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    Hello

    Today I purchased a Remington model of 1917 and I was hoping to learn more about it.

    From what I have learned using google the barrel is not original to the gun as there is a "HS" stamp where I have come to learn should be an "R" to match the maker name on the receiver. It also has been stamped in the wood with a O.G.E.K. which I guess means its been rebuilt?

    I really don't know what kind of information to provide to help in identification.
    The serial number is 579*** and it has the "Flaming-Bomb" mark all over it. There is also a "P" stamped with a circle around it on the wood behind the trigger guard. I haven't come across any information on what this might be.

    The wood has got quite a few dings in it but nothing to severe from what I can tell.

    If it's not too much trouble I would like to know an estimated value and more information on where it came from and whats been done too it.

    Thanks for your time and I look forward to reading your responses.
  2. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    DJC,
    Welcome to the forum.
    You have a "Enfield" pattern (P17) rifle made originally for use in WW1. The one you have has been rebarrelled during the WW2 period with an HIGH STANDARD barrel. The O.G.E.K.
    stamping indicates rebuild at Ogden Arsenal with inspection by Elmer Keith (yep, that Elmer). The "flaming bomb" was the Ordnance Dept. acceptance stamps at the time of manufacture and through early part of WW2, later replaced by the "ordnance wheel with crossed cannons" (can't remember exactly when that occurred). The 'circled P' indicates proof firing and acceptance.
    In v.good condition I have seen examples sell just north of 600 bucks here in Eastern PA - higher for better condition or all original. They are becoming more scarce in the market and prices are rising.
    Let's see what folks from other areas have to say.
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2011
  3. DJC

    DJC New Member

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    Great thank you very much
  4. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    DJC,
    You're welcome - glad to help out - thanks for thanking!
  5. permafrost

    permafrost Active Member

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    Wow!
    The inspection stamp alone would make this one very special . Great rifle. I didn't know Elmer Keith did the inspections. Was purty sure I knew it all ,too! Thanks, Jim
  6. jjmitchell60

    jjmitchell60 Active Member

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    All I can add is this, the non-matching barrel is a common thing. One has to concider that it is/was a military weapon that most likely saw service thus when partts wear out or are damaged they are replaced. Now how they are replaced is not by matching up to another original to mamnufacture but a barrel was pulled from a parts bin at the armory and put on the receiver no matter the maker. Another thing is those were used in WWI (and afterwards) by our troops, that rifl;e was most likely the type Sgt York was carrying in France, and they are usually great shooters. I own one as well as the P-14 (303) British look a like (long story but the 1917 is actually a copy of the P-14 british Enfield) and love shooting both. My Great Grand Father carried a 1917 in WWI so anotehr reason I like mine.
    Shoot it, enjoy it, and cherish the old war horse.
  7. DJC

    DJC New Member

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    Everyone has been very helpful and I have just one last question about this gun.

    The gun I bought did not come with a sling. Since I have learned that the gun actually has some history I would like to pair it with a sling that would have been used on this gun in the past. I see a lot of sites with slings and the say that there particular sling will fit an Enfield #1 through #4 or so. I'm completely lost as to what number mine is if they are even talking about the same gun.

    Any info you could provide to help me find a suitable match would be greatly appreciated thank you.
  8. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    You're going to look for a "Sling, Model 1917". I did a little research for you: most of these were made by 'Kerr' and called the 'Nobuckl'. If you do a google using those names you should be able to find original slings - price will range up to around $50 in good, used condition.
  9. DJC

    DJC New Member

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    Again, Thank you very much.
  10. Jim Hauff

    Jim Hauff New Member

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    You're welcome - thanks for thanking.
  11. DJC

    DJC New Member

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    OK I lied about that being my last question before...
    While looking at slings I noticed most of the guns I was seeing in pictures didn't look like mine. I got the rifle out of the safe and realized, it is missing all of the wood pieces other than the main stock. I see a lot of people buy parts for these guns and I was wondering if anyone had a good website I could find some at?

    Thanks again.
  12. jim brady

    jim brady Well-Known Member

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    Try Googeling "SARCO" for an address and maybe an on-line catalog. They usually have a complete line of parts for the U.S. Model of 1917 "Enfield" rifles.

    Be aware of at least two key points: A lot of these rifles were 'sporterized' and altered to the point that restoration is impractical - at least cost wise, and secondly that there were 3 factories producing them (Winchester, Remington and Eddystone).

    If you are just replacing missing parts, finding 'matching' parts isn't really an issuebecause as Jim stated, the rifle was arsenal rebuilt.

    Just to toss in a little Goose Grease, my understanding is that Alvin York and a buddy swiped a couple of M-1903s from some Marines in France, and that HE actually did use one of those vs the ARMY issue Model 1917. Funny, I just can't picture the Gary Cooper movie charactor stealing ANYTHING.
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