Remington Rolling Block...Spanish?

Discussion in 'Black Powder Shooting / Muzzleloaders / Handguns' started by fjmallas1@wi.rr.com, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. fjmallas1@wi.rr.com

    fjmallas1@wi.rr.com New Member

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    Mar 28, 2011
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    I have an early Rolling Block but I have been unable to get a lot of info on the rifle. I have been told that is is a Spanish version, .43 cal. There is no serial number and just one stamp. anyone know how I can find out when this was produced and where?
  2. scrat

    scrat New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
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    let me be the first to try. However before i do so can you answer this.
    I have this car i am trying to find out what it is. it has 4 wheels no name plates at all its big and has 1 mark on it. can anyone tell me what it is.


    Need some more information pics would help too.

    OH i forgot the car has a v8 in it
  3. ElvinWarrior

    ElvinWarrior New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
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    34
    Location:
    Los Angeles California, USA
    It's alot easier to identify a car than a gun me-thinks. There were non-firing display guns manufactured even way back when, fakes abound in this arena, tons of faked "old" guns out there.

    Ya, photographs are necessary, a close up of the one known mark is necessary. But also, sometimes, armory marks and inspection marks were stamped into the undersides of barrels, hidden by the stock or half stock, and sometimes, there are foundry marks on the insides of lockplates, etc. So.. dismantling the gun, to see if there are additional marks, outside of viewing on the assembled gun, is a very good idea too.

    Sincerely,

    ElvinWarrior... aka... David

    Scrat,

    I KNOW that CAR !!! It's a Rolls-Kan-Knarly !!! It is famous for rolling down one hill, and can hardly get up the next !!!
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  4. sewerman

    sewerman New Member

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    Location:
    hurricane ally florida
    maybe I can help you.........

    i researched this rifle somewhat last year with an interest in purchasing.

    remington produced rifles for the USA/USNAVY in calibers .45-50.

    the whitney company assembled remington parts into export guns.
    huge amounts were sold overseas for years.
    some of the few countries that rifles can still be find are: spain, sweden, danes, & egypt. the spanish round is a necked cartridge & i have been told folks use these when the barrels are worn, sharps rifle cases in .44/70. the
    spainish is calibered in .43 & a reformado (armory refurb for shot out barrel) 11.5x57 or 58.
    danish can be found in 7x57, swedish 12mm or 11x57.
    i think the eygptian are in 7x57 too.
    also mexico had some shortened rifles in 7x57.

    the brass is almost $3.00 a case for the .43 factory cases. the basic .45 cases needed to fire form to the reformado casel are as much or more, plus the hassel of doing the work.
    dies for reloding can be pricy.
    the 7x57 is probably cheaper but not a big bore .....
    12mm swedish rifles are out there but are pricy.

    i decided either a rebarrel to 45/70 or 50/70 if the rifle was worth the cost was an option but i decided to just purchase a 45/70 rifle..... cheaper in the long run and probably better accuracey with new barrel.

    S.M.
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  5. runes

    runes Member

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    May 7, 2009
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    Look at the large pins that hold the breech block and hammer. If there are large ears on the ends of these pins that are part of the pins themselves and meet where a screw holds them both then it should be Spanish made. The one I have has no marks. I also have Remingtons and a Whitney.
  6. runes

    runes Member

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    May 7, 2009
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    Forgive me I was mistaken about the pins with ears, that would be for the Whitney.
    The Spanish guns are generally called Oviedo ( from the citywhere they were made)
    They were made at least until 1885. The heads of the pins will be truncated instead of rounded, and have a small seperate plate that holds them in. These guns are more rare than the Remingtons but collector interest is more to the Remingtons. In good shape they are still worth two to three hundred just for the action.
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