Restoration Help

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by mcw120566, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. mcw120566

    mcw120566 Member

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    W. Knoxville, TN
    I recently acquired a Smith and Wesson 39-2. The gun is very tight and hasn’t been fired that much, I 1.) want to re Blue it from years of storage in a leather holster, some of the finish has worn, and 2.) would like to find a set of factory walnut grips for it.

    I know its not a gem of a piece, but for what I have in it, its worth putting a bit of time and money back into it. I hate to something like this got to waste.

    Since I have no luck in the past with bluing, can anyone give any advice on products that will produce a good finish? Or that are somewhat reliable?

    Also, I have search and searched, and cant find a distributor that carries the grips that I’m looking for….Any recommendations?

    Thanks for your help
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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  3. LDBennett

    LDBennett Well-Known Member

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    I think few gunsmiths or home gun tinkerers would or could do a better job than the factory. S&W offers re-bluing for restoring old guns to new. You might consider calling them and making an inquiry.

    One of the biggest problems with getting a gun re-blued is the ineptness of the people doing it. The bluing is no better than the condition of the metal under it so metal preparation is key to a good blue job. Some gunsmiths think that buffing the metal and removing all the factory marking while rounding all the sharp edges is what the customer wants ... a shiny deep finish. But that is not where it is at if the customer expects to not ruin the value of the gun. I think the factory knows best how to do this without heavy leaning on the buffer wheel. I would trust S&W to refinish the gun before trusting the local so called gunsmith. But that's just me.

    LDBennett
  4. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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    The M39s had an aluminum frame which must be anodized-you can't blue it. You have a good gun, and home rebluing the steel will only reduce the value. Contact the factory for a refinish.
  5. mcw120566

    mcw120566 Member

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    Thanks to everyone that replied, contacting Smith wasn't something that I had considered. DHAAAA!
  6. mcw120566

    mcw120566 Member

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    Location:
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    Up Date..........

    Called Smith, They wont touch it! The steel slide stop that is pressed into the Alum. frame can cause the frame to crack when it is removed. Since they have no more frames for this model, they wont do anything with it.

    Back to where I was........Wondering what to do!
  7. Gene Brown

    Gene Brown New Member

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    Jul 22, 2009
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    There may be a solution to your dilemma. As a gunsmith I reblue guns in my trade, and it is true that an improper job of metal prepration can lesson the value of your gun. Knowing this, if you choose to continue with your project I will offer my opinion as to a possible solution. Brownells sells several spray-on professional gun finishes. I have used these spray on baked finishes in my shop with success. My customers seem to be satisfied with the finishes and most say they wear well and offer a durable solution to reblueing. Brownells products are called, Teflon/Moly Oven Cure; Gun-Knote Oven Cure; Backing lacquer, etc. The process of spraying these solution is simple and effective if directions are followed. I personally like the Teflon/Moly oven cure best, but all of the other product have performed well. I have just completed an alum. frame revolver this week and the owner was well pleased. As stated, the process is simple, prepare the metal by air blasting the gun with a fine oxide of glass bead, degrease the gun making sure no oil remains to spoil the finish. Spray the gun with light coats avoiding runs. Do this at least 3 or 4 times waiting 30 minutes between coats. Bake the finish in an oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Brownells web site has all the proper information you will need to do this job.
  8. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

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    I have a 59. Very similar in respects to your 39. On the 39's yes the slide stop is pressed. They don't want to remove it b/c they would have to heat the frame. The risk is that you can't anneal aluminum to many times or else it becomes to hard to work with and brittle. I happened to press one out for a friend on his 39. He got the gun for free so he was out nothing and there were other mechanical issues so a cracked frame is just one more. Getting it back in was more of a challenge. It involved freezing the pin and heating the frame in the pin area and heat sinking the rest.
    I would for the frame do what was stated above. Those bake on finishes do really well. Its also safe to say with the frame that it could be powdercoated If you know someone that knows how to do it and mask off areas you don't want the extra thickness. Duracoat is also an option. I did this on mine and it has held up really well.
    Your slide is a different story. I could tell you now that cold blue will be a waist of your money. The slides are a hardened steel and if the gun has seen much use the areas around the muzzle and ejection port won't take a cold blue at all. Duracoat and bake on is an option. Finding a smith with a hot tank system may do it for a good price if he was willing to include it with another batch of items. Belgium bluing which is my favorite will give you a nice finish but it takes practice.
  9. mcw120566

    mcw120566 Member

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    Location:
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    WOW!!!!

    I love to "tinker" with my guns and I do enjoy the finer points, but Im not willing to take a chance on ruining something that functions quite well just for good looks.....I may just leave the finish as is and acept that it is what it is. For a 100.00 investment, Im afraid I would devalue it more by trying to build the value back into it.

    I will look into the products that you had mentioned, and see what all is involved, I may tap you knowledge a bit more if I decide to move forward with the project. I still want to find some grips! The Pac's that are on it really take away from the pistol.

    Thanks Again for all the input!
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2009
  10. Helix_FR

    Helix_FR Active Member

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    There isn't a whole lot of value to them but it is better than 100.00 bucks. I have pac's on mine too but I like 'em. Value on them depends on who your selling too (if you ever do). The smith collector that knows his stuff, yes the value will drop. Joe Schmo that looking for a decent 9mm at a good price, if your finish is good and it looks brand new to him, he'll be willing to pay more for it. Honestly there is no reason to remove the slide stop and pin to refinish it.
    If you need any help with the finishing process, post it.
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2009
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