Reverse bullet legend

Discussion in 'General Military Arms & History Forum' started by TranterUK, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Thought this may interest some,

    The reverse bullet legend comes from WW1. In short it went that the Germans, faced with the first Tanks, invented by the Brits discovered that their 7.92 rifle bullets bounced off the steel plate. But if they reversed the bullet in the case, so it flew backwards it would penetrate the steel. I knew of the story but few believed it, and certainly not me.

    Well I recently saw this tried out on a documentary, and guess what? It worked! a hole in the steel plate was formed with fragmentation of the plate thrown out behind. The bullet disintegrated.

    Strange, but as it turned out, true.
  2. 45nut

    45nut Active Member

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    :eek::eek::eek::eek:

    That is weird.
  3. Lotsdragon

    Lotsdragon New Member

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    LOL well that is a horse of another color!
  4. olmossbak

    olmossbak New Member

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    What about the spent cobalt 7,62 bullets supplied to the Afgans to use against the Russians? Are you familiar with that story?
  5. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    What do you know?
  6. Interesting, Tranter. It surprises me that a bullet without an ogive could penetrate steel. On the other hand, shaped charges work somewhat on that principle, the idea being for the projectile to burn its way through the material it impacts creating spawl.
  7. Suwannee Tim

    Suwannee Tim New Member

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    That sounds like spalling where a chip files off the inside of the armor. HESH, high explosive squash head shells are designed to do this. Shaped charges are different, they melt a hole through the armor.
  8. 308 at my gate

    308 at my gate New Member

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    I would have to see it to believe.
  9. olmossbak

    olmossbak New Member

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    I know nothing, just something I heard somewhere.
  10. olmossbak

    olmossbak New Member

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    Shaped charges detonate, or rather burn, a set distance from the armor and the copper jet created burns through the armor. That is why stand-off armor works against the RPG7, etc. It is the grating you see on the Strikers, aka armored Renaults.
  11. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    I can tell you what I saw. Much to the surprise of the Army guys running the test, who doubted it would work and said so, a large hole was made in the steel plate, with peppering from impact behind.

    It occurs to me that like a small shaped charge the base of the bullet may have been concave, I dont know, but a large hole was made.

    I for one found this fascinating. If you reverse a .30 bullet in its case and fire it at plate steel, it seems it will make a hole, where it would not when fired point first. An old story that seems to be factual.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2009
  12. kutaho

    kutaho New Member

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    Good logic:)
  13. It does make sense if you think about it, Tranter. Perhaps you remember reading about the steel plates the Germans used in WWI to protect their snipers sent out into No Man's Land to shoot at British troops. For some time the British could do relatively little about them since the .303s they were using simply would not penetrate the steel. Someone got the bright idea to send out a call to the civilian population for some African caliber double rifles, calibers such as the .577 and .600 Nitro Express. It turned out that those heavy, blunt-nosed bullets made short work of the German steel! I've seen photos of the German steel protective plates with nice, neat half-inch or better holes drilled right through them, and doubtless the sniper behind the steel! ;)
  14. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Perhaps we should get mythbusters on it?
  15. I think they much prefer to just blow things up, Tranter, not make neat holes in it. :D Perhaps if we suggested they place about five lbs of C4 behind the steel plate it would interest them more. :eek::D
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