Ruger .357mag Blackhawk re-conversion

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by smlake, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. smlake

    smlake New Member

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    I own a Ruger .357mag Blackhawk older 3 screw model. It was manufactured in the late 1960's and is in very good to excellent condition. I intend to keep this pistol and will not sell it. That will be my son's problem after I am gone. I sent the pistol to Ruger when they recalled the 3 screw models. They converted this pistol into the transfer bar model where it is safe to carry with all 6 cylinders loaded. Ruger sent the original parts back along with the converted gun. I do not carry this gun and shoot it only a few times a year. I have thought about having the gun converted back to the original 3 screw model since I have read it is worth more in its original state (though I will not sell it). I would like to hear opinions regarding the advantages vs the disadvantages of this conversion. Is this conversion something a gunsmith needs to do or is this something I could do myself? I am definitely not a gunsmith. I only take my guns down to the field strip condition for cleaning purposes. Thanks in advance for your ideas and opinions.
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    If you have the orginal parts, it is simply a matter of disassembling the gun and putting the old parts back in. They still fit. It's fairly simple, as I remember (it's been over 20 years since I did mine). A gunsmith is not required.

    If, however, YOU feel safer, carrying the gun with the conversion, I'd suggest leaving it alone (yes, I know -Heresy). Yes, unconverted guns are worth more than converted guns, but as long as you don't lose the parts, there should not be any difference in value. It's a little more complicated than putting the original grips back on, but it's only about a 20-minute fix.
  3. Jim K

    Jim K New Member

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    Leave it alone. Keep the original parts and sell them with the gun, which should make the value the same as a unconverted one. If you convert the gun back and sell it, and the new owner manages to shoot himself or someone else, you could be liable for selling a gun you knew was dangerous. Worse, you had made it safe for yourself, and then made it unsafe before peddling it to an unwitting and innocent person, etc.

    Jim
  4. Oneida Steve

    Oneida Steve Active Member

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    If I owned the gun, I would convert it back to its original form.

    Take it to a smith if you want. If the job is that easy then a gunsmith won't charge much to do it. Be advised that some gunsmiths might refuse to do this job.
  5. oscarmayer

    oscarmayer New Member

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    it was a safety recall. if you undo the recalls fix you're opening up a big can of worms. having the original parts and i'm sure a record at ruger that your gun was converted will make it hard to defend if you happen to sell or give this gun to anyone and they unwittingly hurt themselves or someone else. leave it alone and package up the old parts and sell it that way in the event you want to part with it or if you leave it to a family member .
  6. Suicide*Ride

    Suicide*Ride New Member

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    The reason the un-converted models are more valuable is that the original lockwork almost always has a better, crisper feel to the trigger. Since you've said you'll never sell the firearm, resale value due to how it's set up is mute.

    It boils down to how safe do you want the firearm to be vs. how good the thing shoots. If it were mine, I'd spend the $$$ on a trigger job & see if it feels better than the original equipment. Having a safer firearm is always better than not. ;) Either way, you have a fine, family aireloom worthy of passing down to future generations..... just make sure the extra pieces/parts get bagged & labeled so they don't get lost in the process.

    & welcome to the forum! :D

    SR :)
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2009
  7. smlake

    smlake New Member

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    The responses to my inquiry have offered different points of view. Each comment was very thoughtful and well expressed. I had not thought about the liabilitiy issue. As stated earlier, I will not sell this gun in my lifetime, but if someone was injured with this gun, after I re-converted it, someone, my son, some other relative, or some distant buyer, could possibly be exposed to great liability. This would be in addition to the great tragedy of someone being injured or killed. Given this advice, I have decided not to re-convert it. Incidentally, I purchased this gun from a friend for $75 about 20 years ago. That was his asking price-he no longer wanted it. At the time of purchase, I told him if he wished to reverse the transaction, I would be willing to do so for the same price, $75. That offer still stands but he is not desirous to do so. He certainly has the money and says he does not want or need the gun. I thank each of you for your thoughtful and sage advice. This is such a great web site!!
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