Savage model 1914 problem

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Attaboy, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    I have a Savage model 1914 that has a home made firing pin that drops down when ratcheted. Does anybody have one that could post a picture of the firing pin? I'm not gonna waste my time trying to buy one, I can make one if I saw a working piece. I'm going to include some pics for anybody interested in seeing it. Glad I found this site and my sympathy goes out to the family of Steve the administrator.

    Attached Files:

    • 006.jpg
      006.jpg
      File size:
      139.3 KB
      Views:
      704
    • 007.jpg
      007.jpg
      File size:
      174.6 KB
      Views:
      702
    • 008.jpg
      008.jpg
      File size:
      203.2 KB
      Views:
      770
    • 012.jpg
      012.jpg
      File size:
      143.7 KB
      Views:
      753
  2. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    Sorry for the picture hugeness
  3. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,261
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
  4. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    Thanks, I can't wait to shoot this gun, till then I just aim it and make bullet sounds haha
  5. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,261
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    Been there. I hate having a broken gun that i really really like.
  6. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    Eastern PA
    attaboy,

    Looks to be in pretty nice shape. FP damage can be avoided in the future very easily. That rifle will decock when you pull the trigger and work the slide forward. It does save chamber faces and firing pins.

    I would avoid another home made pin if there is a commercial source. I believe they are hardened steel, tough to do at home. If you are a metalworker though...
  7. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,261
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    Hardening is the easy part. its tempering it so it doesnt lose it hardness yet wont shatter on impact thats the tough part.

    Heating to cherry and quenching in used motor oil will make it extremely hard and a bake in the oven at 450 degrees for a couple hours will temper it but temper it too much and itll be too soft.
  8. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    Eastern PA
    JLA,

    Heating to cherry red in a steel mill meant somewhere around 18-1900 degrees. Big pieces of course. Smaller parts maybe not that hot? J
  9. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    I am good at tempering and metal work, but if I can put an original piece back, I will. A friend gave me this gun and it has been inop for a very long time, which is good because that is probably why it's still in great shape. I'll be replacing the operating bar also, this one works but has been broken and brazed. Whew!! so many guns out there to love.
  10. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    Eastern PA
    Attaboy,

    I happy to hear you're restoring this back to operation. It's worth it for the small amount of dollars and time you invest.

    Do not shoot high velocity 22's in this rifle. Target or standard velocity only. This model wasn't built hi vel ammo in mind. This model was discontinued in 1925. Hi vel ammo came out in the 30's.

    Can you tell me if the top tang is marked with the model? I am maintaining a database of SN's and characteristics of Savage 1903's, 1909's, 1914's and 25 pump 22 rifles. Thanks in advance.
  11. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,261
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    yeah the smaller ones still glow at the same temp. It just doesnt take near as long to get it there. and you can use a much more controllable means of heat. I have made a few small parts. Most memorable was a firing pin for a Tec 9 copy. Couldnt get a pin for it but could get one for a tec 9, which was the same pin but longer. so i measured the 2 against each other, and hacked off the shank and pin from the tec 9 pin and tig welded it to the base of the copy cats pin (which was the striker catch or sear if you will) then i cleaned the weld up and re-heat treated it. I tossed it in the smoker firebox with a good hot fire and let it heat to glowing point and stay there awhile. then pulled it out and dunked it in a bucket of oil. it came out hard as hell but brittle. So i baked it in the oven at 425 degrees for an hour. As far as I know that pin is still firing 9 mils.
  12. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    The model is stamped on the top of the barrel, it's shown in the first pic. Is there any way to tell date of manufacture? serial number is 38797
  13. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    Eastern PA
    JLA,

    Thanks for the info.
  14. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    300
    Location:
    Eastern PA
    attaboy,

    Yes, thanks for the pictures I did notice the model mark on the bbl. Savage sometimes also marked the rear top tang the same way, below the safety. I was wondering if yours is so marked. I have two 1914's, one with and one without.

    No published data on Savage RF serial numbers. The Savage Model 1899/99 does have a public SN lookup. However, I do have records of two lettered 1914's and so have the dates for these two. Keep in mind that these were produced from 1914 thru 1925 and maybe into 1926. Also, Savage was busy during WW I making Lewis machine guns, Tommy guns, etc. During the war Savage changed their bluing process from the very high polish bright bluing you see on pre war rifles from Savage, both RF and CF. Yours looks like it has the duller finish even allowing for age and use. Maybe 1918 or 1919 for your rifle attaboy.

    You can find out for sure if you want to spend some money. John T. Callahan is the Savage historian and provides factory letters for a fee, about $30.00 I think.
  15. Attaboy

    Attaboy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    Jasper Georgia
    I thought the barrel was the only model stamp, but yes it is on the tang as well. I hadn't noticed that till you said something
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Technical Questions & Information savage model 116...30-06 springfield bolt action Dec 3, 2014
Technical Questions & Information savage model 1907 Jul 27, 2014
Technical Questions & Information Slide assembly compatibility - Savage Model 30 to Hiawatha VR130 12 ga pump Jul 26, 2014
Technical Questions & Information Savage Model 87A mag guide May 20, 2014
Technical Questions & Information Savage model 4 .22 Apr 1, 2014

Share This Page