Savage model 99? with pic

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Jackman, Jan 1, 2011.

  1. Jackman

    Jackman New Member

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  2. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    The opening is the port for viewing the cartridge counter. As the magazine empties, it will tell you how many are left in the magazine.

    The rifle takes down by removing the fore end using the latch, opening the action and unscrewing the barrel. This feature eased transport of the rifle by making it shorter.
  3. Jackman

    Jackman New Member

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    Wow Thank you thats good info :cool:, I have had the forward stock off however have gone no farther than that or knew it was even doable , I will try later . does the cartridge counter have numbers on it? mine is pretty tarnished and I do not see any numbers......
  4. LDBennett

    LDBennett Active Member

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    The Savage Model 99 in its early form used a rotating drum internal magazine made of brass. What you see in the window is the edge of the drum. As you load and unload it, it counts the remaining cartridges for you. So there are numbers visible in the window as the magazine is loaded up.

    Later versions used a standard removable magazine and are less desirable to collect. Mine is a 1950's vintage 300 Savage with the rotary magazine and is ACCURATE! They make very good shooters regardless that collectors want them.

    The Savage rotary drum magazine design is very similar to the Ruger 10/22. That's because Ruger, as a young man trying to get into the firearms business, was infatuated with the Savage Model 99. He copied the Savage concept for the Ruger 10/22 magazine internals. At one point early in his career he made a Model 99 into a semi auto and hawked his concept around the gun industry (no one bought it but did hire him for his gun genius).

    LDBennett
  5. Jackman

    Jackman New Member

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    Thanks LD you always have good info :cool:, my 99 is the early version 1930's shes a bit rough from a half century of sitting around but non the less I call it my favorite rifle.

    Is the barrel take down ability on the 99 something meant for a firearm owner or more so for a gun smith?
  6. LDBennett

    LDBennett Active Member

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    Jackman:

    TD guns were popular in earlier days when the guns had to be transported in trains, on horseback, or carried with other luggage. The TD feature was meant for the consumer to use regularly. But....

    As the gun wears over time the TD connection can get loose. I don't have a Savage takedown but I know Winchester made allowances for tightening up the fit. I would take the gun apart, inspect the connection for tightness, make the adjustment, and probably not do it again until I determined the fit might not be tight enough again. Doing the TD regularly induces wear that is not necessary for todays means of transporting guns.

    LDBennett
  7. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    If you are sure your rifle is from the 30's, the barrel probably is a full thread takedown. That means it needs to be fully unscrewed. This differs from the early takedowns that had the quarter turn threads, such as my Model 1899 250-3000 from 1919.

    If you want to remove the barrel BE SURE the ACTION is OPEN or you'll break the extractor on the bolt. If the barrel doesn't want to turn just using your hands, I would recommend leaving it alone, nothing good can come by proceeding further.
  8. Jackman

    Jackman New Member

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    Thanks Steve , I will investigate a little further...
  9. Jackman

    Jackman New Member

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    Investigating a little further I find the barrel too tight to turn by hand so I'll not tempt breakage and leave it be, also nice to see that the barrel is stamped with the last four of the serial number and they are a match :cool:, serial number is 290265 which makes this Savage model 99 a 1926..... Also found the round counter is in nice shape and cleaned up really nice its too bad the barrel and receiver will not clean up so easily , they are speckled with rust spots......
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2011
  10. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    Jackman,

    Savage numbered the TD barrels to the rifle inconsistently. Mine isn't.

    The usual treatment is 4 0 steel wool and light oil for light rust removal. Brass wool is also used by some. I haven't foiund anything that works 100%.

    These are great rifles. Only real book out there about them is Doug Murray's. Worth getting if you don't have it. Provides a lot of detail on the various models and variations.
  11. 300 H&H

    300 H&H Active Member

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    Yes the 99's are great rifles,

    Like LD I only have one, a 50's vintage RS in 250/3000 Savage. I have not shot it alot as it is pristine...But I did sight it at 100 yds with some 85 gr reloads. The last group I shot was 5 in 1.5"....with the factory peep sights! These rifles will shoot very well indeed. I wish I had purchased several of the ones I passed on over the years. Might have become a lever action man....

    Regards, Kirk
  12. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    Kirk,

    R/RS models have managed to avoid my house for some reason. Yours in 250-3000 would be perfect. I have a NIB 1952 EG 250-3000, the 1899 already mentioned and a mid 50's model F in 250-3000. And an early 1899 E in 250-3000 from the early 20's. All have the slow 1 in 14 twist so will handle only the shorter 100 gr bullets like the Speer Hot Cor. Mostly the 87 grain bullets do well enough.

    It's not too late to add one or two more.

    Steve
  13. 300 H&H

    300 H&H Active Member

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    Here is my RS 250/3000....

    [​IMG]
  14. LDBennett

    LDBennett Active Member

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    Mine in 300 Savage looks to have been on many hunts and shot little. The stock looks used but not too abused. The gun originally was covered internally in surface rust that removed easily with 0000 steel wool and oil so that there is no evidence it was ever there. The bore is perfect.

    I bought the gun from a co-worker. It was his DAD's that was purchased new upon graduation from college as an engineer in the 1950's. My friend got the gun when his father passed away and wanted the rust removed. So I did and offered to buy it. I think I won. I gave him the going price at the time over 15 years ago. I still got a bargain looking back on it today based on how well this gun shoots.

    LDBennett
  15. 1969SS396

    1969SS396 New Member

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    Question about the Take down model.

    I have one, is it more,less or no more, desirable than a non take down?
  16. 300 H&H

    300 H&H Active Member

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    Take downs are more desirable as less were made this way, and they were a higher cost gun when new....However if they are worn at the barrel threads, this may not be the case. Is yours fully threaded (newer) or does it have the interupted (older)take down threads?

    Regards, Kirk
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2011
  17. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    With regard to the takedown question, I think it is a question of which model and was it standard or a special order option.

    For instance, a Model 1899 H in 22 HP was available in both configurations, solid frame and takedown. Solid frames are rarer and more valuable for equal condition.

    Solid frame rifles could be ordered as a takedown back in the day. Definitely worth more.

    The pre war Model 99 F's and G's were only available in takedown.

    This feature was not resurrected after WW II.
  18. grampawmike

    grampawmike New Member

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    OK Jackman.......here is what that 'little opening' should look like when the rifle is cleaned up. The gun shown is of 1922 manufacture. It is also a take-down model. On the bottom of the barrel you should see something of this sort.....and there should be a 'witness' mark on the receiver and your barrel to show proper alignment when replacing the barrel. Not sure of your date of mfg. but your barrel may have interrupted threads as they changed to that at a date subsequent to the mfg. date of mine. Mike
    P.S. This gun is marked on the receiver top only as "Savage 1899 Model".
    P.P.S. Your rifle may also (I think it should) have an indicator that shows when the rifle is cocked. It's a little pin that protrudes above the rear of the receiver....as shown. This is NOT a loaded chamber indicator.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2011
  19. TRAP55

    TRAP55 New Member

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    The take down model was also made in a two barrel version, one barrel in a rimmed cartridge, and the other for the .410 shotshell. Finding one with the original case is a rarity.
    There was a uber rare Military Musket version w/bayonet issued to the RCMP for sale on the auctions a while back. A Holy Grail for collectors!
  20. steve99f

    steve99f New Member

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    Trap55,

    The musket model was sold in Canada but not to the RCMP. The Montreal Home Guard bought them. They are rare and valuable as are the bayonets.

    You have to watch out with those cased sets, more than a few put togethers. A customer could buy the .410 barrel separately. They operate as single shots when using the 410 barrel.
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