scarring/scratches bottom surface of Remington 514 bolt

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by wpshooter, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    I recently purchased another Remington model 514 and when I took the bolt out of the rifle, I noticed that just behind the bolt face on the under/lower surface of the bolt body it has some fairly significant scarring/sratches in the metal of the bolt body.

    The scarring is only on about the first 1/2 inch just behind the face of the bolt, it does NOT extend all the way back the entire length of the bolt body.

    I think I can take a dremel tool and put the bolt in a vise and smooth out the scratches.

    But does anyone know what might have caused this ?

    I am sort of theorizing that some previous owner of the rifle did not know that they needed to pull the trigger in order to take that bolt out of the back of the receiver and that they forced/jerked the bolt out of the back of the gun with the trigger mechanism not being properly lowered and the trigger mechanism had been scarring the bolt surface as it was forceablely pull backward over the trigger.

    Do you think this is likely what caused this scarring or is there something else that might have caused this ?

    Thanks.
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  2. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,271
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    If thats the case the trigger sear will likely be damaged, or at least dulled significantly.
  3. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    JLA:

    Thanks for your reply.

    Can you tell me where the trigger sear is located on the Remington 514 ?

    I don't seem to see one listed here.

    http://www.gunpartscorp.com/catalog/Products.aspx?catid=4290

    Thanks.
  4. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,170
    Location:
    ND, USA
    The sear is part of the trigger (part#26 on the diagram). The sear surface should have a nice crisp back-cut edge on it and the top should be fairly smooth & roughly parallel to the bolt when in the at-rest position.

    Is this a different 514 than the bent ejector 514 in your other thread? If so, you should be able to compare the sear surface on the two to see if there's any scoring or damage on this rifle.
  5. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    Bindernut:

    Thanks for your reply.

    Yes, this is a different rifle from the one I was asking about the bend in the ejector pin.

    So are you saying that perhaps that the top flat surface of the front of the trigger #26 (the portion towards the front of the gun) may have some type of burr on it that is causing a/the grinding and scarring of the bolt body ?

    The other gun that I was asking about the bend of the ejector pin does NOT have any such scarring on the front of the bolt's body.

    I will compare the front surface of the 2 triggers when I get home. Oh, and one thing I just thought of, the trigger on the most recently purchased rifle has the "thin" trigger and the other rifle has the "wide" shoed trigger. I wouldn't think that would make any difference.

    Thanks.
  6. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,170
    Location:
    ND, USA
    Yup, pay attention to the flat on top of the trigger (#26) and the very front surface in the area I've got circled in the attached pic.
    The sear edge is where the arrow is pointing to. Check this for any damage. It should have a fairly sharp edge on it and be undercut so just the very top edge contacts the firing pin when the action is cocked.

    With the action out of the stock, also make sure there isn't a bunch of crud/rust/whatever clogging up the trigger spring (on the other end of the trigger) also. I've seen that area get built up with years of garbage so that the trigger can't be pulled back far enough to get the bolt to release smoothly.

    Attached Files:

  7. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    Thanks.

    Don't think it is the trigger spring.

    I sort of looked at that this morning just before I had to rush off to work. Spring seemed O.K. to me.

    It has to be something with a fairly sharp edge on it to cut/score into the metal on the bottom of this bolt body the way it has !!!

    I sort of looked at the front portion of the trigger that you have circled and nothing struck me as really odd but I was in a hurry to get off to work, so did not have time to really take a good look and it and to maybe compare it to the surface of the trigger on the other rifle. I am going to try to take a look at it more closely when I get home.

    BUT I am still sort of thinking that someone had been "FORCING" the bolt out of the gun without pulling the trigger or perhaps just not pulling it completely and somewhat dragging that front portion of the trigger/sear against the bottom of the bolt body as it was pulled backward out of the receiver. You would think that they would have noticed these markings that it was making on the bolt after the first few times they did this and realized that they were doing something wrong !!!

    Thanks for your help.
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  8. JLA

    JLA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    18,271
    Location:
    Heart Of Texas
    put up some pics of the damage...
  9. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    Sorry, I don't have a camera.
  10. wpshooter

    wpshooter Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2009
    Messages:
    310
    I inspected the trigger mechanisms on the gun yesterday evening.

    There is no burr or anything unusual on the trigger sear part (looks exactly like the trigger on my other gun on which the bolt is not scarred).

    I am now fairly well convinced that this scarring was caused by exactly what I had originally suspected and that is that some former owner of the gun was "RIPPING"/forcing the bolt out of the back of the receiver without (or at least not fully) pulling the trigger when they extracted the bolt out of the back of the receiver.

    I say that because when I look at where the scarring is located on the bottom of the bolt body just behind the face of the bolt, the sear portion of the trigger is the only thing that is in a position to cause this scarring and the sear portion would directly contact that portion of the bolt body when it is extracted IF the trigger is not properly pulled when doing the extraction.

    Must have been someone that had never had any type of gun before or perhaps some young kid who had no one to properly instruct them about how to take the bolt out of the gun.

    Thanks for all of your help.

Share This Page