Shotgun shell clarification

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by Islandboy, Aug 26, 2009.

  1. Islandboy

    Islandboy New Member

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    Can someone please list, from largest single payload to smallest shot size, the run of normal shotgun shell typesin 12 ga?.
    I.E. slug, thru to #12? Not shell length or powder load, but the projectile scheme.
    Also, brass I.E. high brass, and variations.
    I realize manufacturers will have variations but.....
  2. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

  3. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    http://books.google.com/books?id=eu...t&resnum=2#v=onepage&q=low base shell&f=false

    Page 16 talks about low base and high base shells. Typically, when shotgunners talk about "low base" and "high base" shells, they are talking about standard vs. higher powered shells. This is not strictly true, but was common in the early days of paper shells. Today, the relative power of a shell cannot be detirmined by looking at the depth of the base.

    Pops
  4. Islandboy

    Islandboy New Member

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    The reason for the question was some loads are called shotshell and some are buck, but with same numbers so I question if there is some overlap.
    There is also Target and ect ect.
    Thanks Pops.
  5. Islandboy

    Islandboy New Member

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    Thought so, #1 thru #4 are either shot or buck and they're quite different.
    I've never seen T or F either.
    Confusion abounds I suppose, till some study is done.
  6. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    If it's just a number, they are usually talking about birdshot. If talking about buckshot, that will usually be noted. If someone told me they had a box of #4s or #2s, I think, "Heavy duck or turkey loads". If they were not talking about birdshot, they would say, "#4 buck", or "Single ought buck", etc.
  7. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

    Shot shell = any shot up to (not including) #4 buck.
    Buck shot = #4 and larger (not including slugs)
    Slugs, = any single projectile load, whether sabotted or not.

    Why? Because it's fun to confuse newbies, I guess. :D I never really understood the rationale behind all this, but just figured there was some reason burried with a centuries-gone blacksmith.

    Target, skeet, light game, long range, goose load and Call Aunt Millie to bring the first aid kit, just mean the relative power of the load formula. Some of it is marketing poof but most of it is a good guide to tell you how badly you will get rattled when you pull the trigger.

    Pops
  8. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

  9. armedandsafe

    armedandsafe Guest

  10. Big ugly

    Big ugly New Member

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    Then there is Ugly Sr's Stupid Human Shot Shell Slamer. It is a combination of Drill scrap, Crushed rock salt, and #9 bird shot stuffed into a 3" magnum shell. It dont hold a pattern worth a poop but it eats the hell out of paper plate at 15 feet. Pops keeps it loaded in a Short old Stevens Pump that is just at the leagle limit. Ugly damage, I mean bad. That drill scrap shure does eat up the the paper and the rock salt is just there for the irritation purposes.


    My father has too much time on his hands.
  11. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    That is kinda purty, but it's in 8x57 rimmed. That's even harder to find than the 9.3x57 for my alg rifles. And it's a single trigger. I don't trust them in a double.
  12. almost a marine

    almost a marine New Member

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    well ducks,geese, pheasants,quails and even TURKEYS drop best when you use magnum or high velocity rounds; preferably within 2,4,5,6BB,71/2, 8, or 9. grain.
    quail,doves,pigeons,rabbits, squirrels, grouse, partridge. If you want to use something a little more inexpensive then you might like field or game loads. preferably 6, 71/2, or 8, grain;but sometimes you might need to take on something bigger like a bear you might want to stick with slugs with a 9 grain or higher. at least have some backed up just in case.

    you might also try a 12 gauge with a higher round capacity and a quick feed out system for bears because they don't go down easy.
    in any case it's best just to avoid bears.... unless thats what you're hunting for.
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2009
  13. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    What in the world are you talking about? "Grain" is a unit of weight. A 12 gauge shot load uses around an ounce of shot. One ounce is 437.5 grains. The smokeless powder charge for a 12 gauge is around 15 to 20 grains (depending on powder). A "9 grain slug"?
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