Skinning lessons

Discussion in 'The Hunting & Fishing Forum' started by kravi, Apr 12, 2004.

  1. kravi

    kravi New Member

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    Gentlemen,
    I was wondering if any of you could recommend where to learn basic deer hunting techniques (such as field dressing the deer). I've been hunting a couple of times, but always with more experienced people (who seemed quite comfortable with the slicing and dicing aspects). I've never been initiated.
    The hiding, stalking, and shooting I'm comfortable with (thought tips are always welcome). It is more the technical aspects of what to do with the carcass that escape me.

    Thanks,
    Kravi
  2. bigboom338

    bigboom338 New Member

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    Best place to learn is with an expierienced hunter ,you do the work and have them guide you.
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2004
  3. kravi

    kravi New Member

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    I would normally agree. Sadly, I don't know any experienced deer hunters. Sadly, I don't know any deer hunters at all. My previous hunting experience was through "friends of friends". Doesn't help much.

    -Kravi
  4. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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  5. kravi

    kravi New Member

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    Inplanotx. You da man! Thanks!

    -Kravi
  6. inplanotx

    inplanotx New Member

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    Glad to be able to help out! If you want to find more, go to the google search at the bottom of this page and type in

    "field dressing deer"

    exactly as shown with quotes and you will see many more as I did. Enjoy!

    Here's one complete with pictures online:

    How to field dress a deer
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2004
  7. Marlin

    Marlin *TFF Admin Staff Chief Counselor*

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    Good information, Plano.

    I found the latter useful and a good background lesson.
  8. 280freak

    280freak New Member

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    I kinda like the way an old gentleman explained the process to me when I was just starting out - "Well, my boy, ya open 'er up, ya see, and everthin' what's inside of 'er, well, ya wants ta get all that out of 'er, don't ya see."
  9. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    Kravi, I was looking at the last link IPT gave ya and I'd like to add one comment. We usually do it very similar to this, but we hang the deer from it's hind legs. We have a triangular rack that hooks into its tendons and hoists it over a tree limb. This make skinning ang gutting a lot easier since you dont have to bend over. Plus, if you get set up right, you can hook onto the skin with a 4-wheeler of truck and take the skin off really quickly. Hanging them also helps to drain the blood out of the meat. Some people dont do that, but I recommend it. It can help the taste of the meat just as much as doing all your butchering quickly after the kill, so I cut thier throats regardless whether they need it or not so they can drain.
  10. Gunfyter

    Gunfyter New Member

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    Kravi...

    don't forget to shoot the deer first. :D Just funnin' ya. With the Maryland DNR trying to reduce the ever expanding deer herd, you can shoot around 36 deer this year if you hunt all of the zones and the various weapons.
  11. kravi

    kravi New Member

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    Don't think I want to shoot much more than I can eat. Which is probably only a deer. I think I'd like doing more, but I can't imagine myself just wasting something that tasty.

    As for the hanging it up after slitting it's throat. That's kinda funny, because that is how you kill animals to make them Kosher :). Can't have any blood in the meat.

    What's this about a truck? What, you just hook a chain onto the chest of the deer and rip it's skin off? How does that work. It sounds really $@&#ing amusing. I'd need to bring my digital camera to witness that one ;)

    -Kravi
  12. Gunfyter

    Gunfyter New Member

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    I know that you were interested in the whole process, but believe me, the easiest way is to field dress the animal, get it out of the woods and take it to a processor. Out here in the country, you can get one butchered and ready to wrap for about $30. If you don't want all of the meat you can donate it to Hunters for The Hungry and take, say, the loins and it won't cost you a dime.

    In order to skin and cut one up, you need a hoist, grambel, meat saw and a place to do it. Our laws now say that the animal must be covered while in-transit so the bambiists won'y be offended.
  13. kravi

    kravi New Member

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    I didn't know that there was such a thing as Hunters for the Hungry. I'm glad to hear there is (I should have expected it, of course).

    I have to hide the carcass during transport so as not to offend the bambiists? Fair 'nuff. I got a cheap plastic tarp that should do the job just fine. Now I just gotta find out the Hunters for the Hungry headquarters and find out where they are. And wait until next season, of course. :-(

    Thanks,

    - Kravi
  14. Gunfyter

    Gunfyter New Member

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    Hunter for The Hungry

    was started by a long-time friend of mine. It has grown to being nationwide. If you check with a local gunshop they should be able to tell what deer processing butchers work with the program.
  15. Country101

    Country101 Active Member

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    deer pull

    Kravi, taking the skin off the deer with the truck is real simple, as long as you have a good limb that wont break. When you've got the beer hanging up, cut the skin away from the legs and a little ways bown the back(a liitle of the butt should be showing and nothint left connected, the front legs should also be cut away.) Take a tennis ball or something and wrap the skin around it. Then take your rope and tie a slip-knot to go around the tennis ball. This should make a good hold for the skin. Hook on to your truck and take off slowly. The skin should just pull off the deer(given that you made the correct cuts). You may need to cut some of the fat and muscle off as it's being pulled. Sometimes the skin is attached so firmly, it will take chunks out of the top part of the meat. You'll be left with the skin attached only at the neck. If you want it to come all the way off, just cut a ring around the neck and make the appropriate cuts to allow it to pull off. Anyway, it's generally easier than pulling on it by hand.

    I hope that was worded well enough so you understand what I'm talking about.

    Yeah, takin it to get processed is a LOT easier. I might start gettin mine done. I made some FINE jerky this year though. Wish I had several more deer to cut up. I dont like how most processors do jerky. it's too thin usually. I made some that was perfect. Woulda been a lot easier with a meat slicer though. Doin it by hand is a pain.
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