Snub Nose For Home Defense?

Discussion in 'Self Defense Tactics & Weapons' started by ninjatoth, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    Sanford,Michigan
    I am not trained at all in defense,so I just went it alone with my own thoughts on home defense and ended up with a 2" .357.I figured if I was ever tackled,I could manuveur it enough to shoot the bad guy off of me,and it would also be easier to keep from being snatched from out of my hands.Anyone have any thoughts on my way of thinking?
  2. vytoland

    vytoland New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    618
    Location:
    Illinois
    what ever you choose to use for defense, don't let the BG get close enough to tackle you. you need to take care of business before that happens

    don't think about it. DO IT!
  3. woolleyworm

    woolleyworm Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    4,938
    Location:
    SW Fort Worth
    My thoughts on any defense...............TRAIN, TRAIN AND TRAIN. Hit the books, go to class, learn proper safety tecniques and get to the range to practice; Often. As I've posted before, one of my firearms pet peeves are gunowners who keep a loaded weapon at home, yet don't ever get out to the range.
    A .357 snubbie is a fine defensive weapon, very fine; but without knowing any weapon "personally", you may not get the desired effect from it. Knowing what ammo works best and where your aimpoint/bullet impact are at, is what is going to save your butt, not just pulling the trigger.

    Welcome to the forums and Enjoy !!
  4. Doc1911

    Doc1911 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    874
    Location:
    USA
    IMO, the snubbie is not a good home defense weapon. While it is a great CQ and backup weapon - at least in my home if someone breaks down one of the doors I could be making in excess of 20 yard shots. In such a situation I would rather have a longer barrel on the weapon - especially if I am shooting in low light, etc.

    In addition, at least in FL, we are having multiple assailants enter homes - 2-4 BGs - so in such a case I would still desire to be better armed with a shotgun or at least a 4"-5" weapon.

    In FL we have a Castle Doctrine. If you enter my home w/o permission, I am not waiting for you to tackle me - if the BG got that far I haven't done my job correctly.

    Something to slow down the BGs if they are in complete darkness is to train your children NOT to put their toys up, but rather leave them in strategic positions .... (also arrange your furniture to channel the BGS ... force them to come to you where you already have pre-arranged fields of fire ....).
  5. I have mixed emotions about a .38 snubbie for home defense. Certainly, it will do the job if you don't get into a sustained firefight with more than one opponent. Unlikely, but always possible. Keep in mind also that a snubbie is not a terribly easy weapon to learn to use accurately due to the short sight radius. Practice, practice, practice is the name of the game if you choose to use one.

    Also, I would strongly suggest you load that .38/357 with good hollowpoint .38s, not .357s, for home defense use. The muzzle blast, sound effects, and recoil from a .357 at close quarters in a confined space is unbelievable! Follow up shots are difficult for even a trained user.
  6. Marlin

    Marlin *TFF Admin Staff Chief Counselor*

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2003
    Messages:
    13,854
    Location:
    At SouthernMoss' side forever!
    I carry a older model S&W 60 as it is lighter than wither the 1911 or the Browning Hi-Power. With the weight of my oxygen bottle and valve, it is easier.

    At other times, I have carried it as a back-up in an ankle holster. Once trained, one can do damage with it. Having been on the street years ago, I don't hesitate to carry and use it.

    I do agree with the others, though, that it is not the ideal weapon for home defense. I don't have, but would like to, a short 12 gauge with a long tube, i.e., the Remington 870 designed for home and self-defense. That would be the ideal.....
  7. Very true, Marlin. Nothing, absolutely NOTHING beats a short-barreled 12 with a full cylinder barrel at close range. I keep a Marlin 500 with an 18 inch barrel for just that reason.
  8. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Have you tried the gun at a range with full power loads? If not it might be an idea. :) You will go with Pistols suggestion, and buy some .38spls.
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 4, 2009
  9. You are quite correct, Tranter. Been there, done that, got the T-shirt. ;) A .357 in a light, short-barreled revolver is by no means easy or comfortable to shoot. In fact, personally I find them actually painful.
  10. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,436
    Location:
    UT
    And that's at a range. I can't imagine the muzzle flash / blast in a confined space like a hallway.
  11. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    Sanford,Michigan
    I shoot about 50 rounds a month through it,DA,SA, sometimes .357 158s,sometimes .38 158s.I notice even in SA,hitting a target with the .357s is alot harder.I have no problem hitting a notebook sized target at 25 yards with .38s,but the .357s are a different story.I did some DA shooting while moving one handed with .38s also,and could hit my target,I havent tried that with .357 loads yet,but I have a feeling It wouldn't go as well.Can someone tell me why I am way off with full .357s even in SA slow shots,I am way high,.38s arent a problem though?It can't possibly be kicking up before the bullet leaves the barrel can it?!
  12. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    2,948
    Location:
    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
    It's not the ammo, it's you, bud...Pushing in anticipation of recoil breaks the wrist slightly up and causes the shot placements to go high.

    You can check this easily by loading 2 or 3 random cylinders and closing it blind...just watch for your behavior on the dry chambers and you'll see what is happening.

    **Some people do the opposite and dip their head subconsciously down, causing the muzzle to dip.
  13. Lotsdragon

    Lotsdragon New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    813
    Location:
    Potosi, Mo
    Practice practice practice! Thats the key!Switch it up some so you can feel the difference. dont like a snubbie myself but as everyone else will tell you its no the caliber its the placement. IF bg's do come at you dont let them get within grabbing distance. Be safe and have fun but practice is the key!
  14. And most LTs have their heads stuck. . . oh, never mind, that's a different topic. :D;):p
  15. Maximilian II

    Maximilian II New Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,385
    Location:
    Northwest GA
    Scientifically: does a .357 Magnum bullet fired from a short barrell like those found in derringers or snubnose revolvers REALLY achieve energy superior to .38 special rounds? I have heard they don't. Anyone checked?
    My info, which is hearsay at best, says there's no benefit in using .357 Mag in short barrelled pistols.
    I'm assuming factory loads here, but I'd listen to handloaders too.
  16. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    Sanford,Michigan
    In this test,the best winchester .38+p achieved 258 ft lbs from a 2.5" barrel,as where the same gun fired a remington .357 with 429 ft lbs.That is figured from the winchester .38+p 158 grain at 858fps,and the remington .357 being 125 grain at 1243fps.According to them,there is a huge difference
  17. ninjatoth

    ninjatoth Former Guest

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    Messages:
    369
    Location:
    Sanford,Michigan
  18. delta13soultaker

    delta13soultaker New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Messages:
    2,948
    Location:
    Depends on Uncle Sam's whim every 3 yrs.
    An opinion to think about...

    Looking at ft-lbs in handgun energy is totally pointless.

    429 ft-lbs is less than a kid at martial arts practice can deliver with a punch.

    I say with some humor...If it is below 1,000 ft-lbs, you're going to get further comparing nail polish colors or Ann Rice novels than you will ft-lbs of energy.


    The point is this, in a 2.5" the terminal ballistics difference between .38, .38+P, and .357 Mag is not great enough to warrant the cost the higher power ammo taxes the firer.

    .357 Mag indoors will pop ear drums, leave you confused, and the flash is an orange ball everywhere you look for 30 minutes.

    .38 +P is just about as bad.

    The recoil of these ammunition in lightweight sub-nosed revolvers is a reduction in firepower; you are trading the ability for rapid follow-up shots, recoil management, accuracy and the user forgiveness of standard pressure .38 Special ammunition for this: hard to use ammunition that punishes the firer and has no great terminal ballistics advantage.

    You are indoors:

    You have 5 rounds...all need to be accurate.

    A standard pressure or reduced recoil load (Federal) or even target wadcutters are easy to manage indoors.


    The ammunition is not going to keep you alive. The handgun is not going to keep you alive. You're the one everything falls on. So whatever ammunition you choose, go practice with that roscoe often....aimed fire=center mass.
  19. Blackhawk Dave

    Blackhawk Dave New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Messages:
    741
    Location:
    Denton, TX
    RE, long-barrel (shotgun, etc ) vs. pistol. 12 guage is better at at stand-off position. If you're going down the hall, looking for a bad guy, the gun gets to the doorway a long time before you do, giving the BG lots of time to grab it, push it out of the way, whatever. It becomes a lever with you at the fulcrum. A pistol of any type, in hand, puts two hands on the gun and the ability to lever the gun towards the BG, even if he's trying to grapple with you. You pull back, it extends the BG, putting the leverage on your side, and he's toast.

    Not my opinion, but from several experts in the field. Seen it demonstrated as well, and it seems to work.

    Now, if I know someone's trying to come in the front door, and I have time, my 12 guage will be the first weapon, with the pistol in my belt. Two loads through the door should discourage ANYONE.

    Finally, IMHO, don't worry about foot pounds, etc in close proximity. I shoot both .38 SP and .357 rounds. Both will go through several layers of 3/4" plywood. If it will go through plywood, it will certainly do a job on a person. If the person's on the other side of a sheetrock wall, neither will slow appreciably and both will do the job. The only real reason to worry about speed would be at distance, and in a self-defense issue, that's close quarters and not a real worry.
  20. Quite true, Delta, and that is a mistake that many make. What is so very often forgotten in all the talk about the "power" of one round v. another is the simple fact that only the rounds which impact the target count! You can't stop it if you don't hit it! As you well know, using a weapon that incapacitates the shooter with muzzle blast and recoil is not going to be effective past the first round discharged. I'd much rather have my P230 Sig, or your Walther ;), in a closed room fight than any .357 magnum ever made. :cool:
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
Self Defense Tactics & Weapons Snubby-.38 spl.+P or .357 for SD? Apr 20, 2011
Self Defense Tactics & Weapons Combat Snubby Shooting the Askins Way Jun 14, 2008
Self Defense Tactics & Weapons Snubby Tactics May 9, 2008