Solid 1911 platform

Discussion in 'The 1911 Forum' started by bob1010, Jan 25, 2010.

  1. bob1010

    bob1010 New Member

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    Jan 18, 2010
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    I am wanting to buy a good solid 1911. I have heard of the different conversions out there for different calibers. I want to buy some of them, that way I can have one handgun that can shoot several calibers. I am interested in conversions for .22LR, 38 super or acp, .357sig, 40 s&w, 400 corbon. Anybody seen or used any of the conversions? What all is involved? Just a barrel and mag change? Any paticular brands of conversions is the best? Where to find them? Any info or comments will be appreciated. Thanks.
  2. bob1010

    bob1010 New Member

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    I guess this is not a very interesting post huh? I am thinking that I will get a Springfield. I have really liked the ones that I have seen thus far. I just have an interest in the odd calibers even though they are hard to find ammo and stuff. I really like the 1911s because there are so many accessories and parts available for it.
  3. hogger129

    hogger129 Active Member

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    Springfield is one of the best 1911 makers out there. I know they offer the usual .45, and their Loaded line offers a 1911 in 9x19. I don't know if they offer them in any other caliber. I'm considering a Springfield Mil-Spec. I don't know what ALL is different about it than a GI model though. If it's the same thing almost, I might as well just save up $1k and buy a nice 1911 Loaded model. Looking for a Walther P99 also. Probably will get the Walther first if anything.

    The Rock Island GI I have is a pretty good 1911. I paid $500 for it. A little more than they usually cost. I think it's a great 1911 for what I paid. Nothin fancy, but I'm satisfied. If you're looking for something rather inexpensive, new, and a good starter gun, a Springfield GI is a good one to look at.
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2010
  4. NonPCnraRN

    NonPCnraRN New Member

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    Back in the early 70s you could buy a Colt Gov't Model, a Commander (shorter model) or a Gold Cup (target model). Most would buy a either a Gov't or Commander model and do the following: Put sights on it you can actually see, polish the feed ramp and chamber, lower and flare the ejection port and do a trigger job. These were the basic changes most considered minimum qualities of a good 1911. Essentially that is what a Milspec is except for the trigger job. I bought a SS Milspec and had an action job done because I am picky and wanted the minimum of a 4.0 trigger for a SD gun. I prefer the 1911 to look as much like an original as possible. I also don't get hammer bite, so I don't need nor want a beavertail grip safety or flat mainspring housing. If you want more than the basics like a beavertail grip safety, adjustable sights, match barrel and bushing, non MIM parts, etc, yada, yada, yada, you can start with a Milspec and add as you discover that you want or need to change out parts. You should shoot about 300 to 500 rounds to break in the gun and you will discover when that is done if you really need all the bells and whistles that come with higher end guns. I am tinkering with replacing the front sight with a Novak fiberoptic sight and the rear with a Novak low mount sight with a round notch instead of a square notch. I also want a wide spur hammer to make cocking easier. All of these things are niceties that I want, but are nowhere as necessary as the changes that differentiate a Milspec from the original Gov't Model. You can start with a Milspec, get an action job for a decent trigger and use the money saved from not buying a higher end gun and put the money into ammo and good quality magazines. If you are an accomplished shooter and need all the other changes like target quality parts to make a more precision shooter then go for a higher end model. I will limit the changes I already mentioned to my Milspec and if I want a 1911 with drastic changes then I will get another gun that fits my specific need such as target shooting for instance. In the meantime I have a 1911 that is more advanced than what was available when Colt was the only name in town. I hope the ramblings of a satisfied Milspec owner helped answer your questions.
  5. NonPCnraRN

    NonPCnraRN New Member

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    In the previous post I forgot to address the interchangability of different calibers. You can buy a complete top end that fires the 22 lr for practice. This will fit most 1911 full size or Commander size guns. As to swapping out barrels to shoot a different caliber in a 1911, remember the new chambering will have to be based off of a parent cartridge. For instance you can swap out a 357 Sig barrel for a 40 S&W as the 40 S&W is the parent cartridge. The 400 Corbon is a necked down 45 ACP to 40 cal. What you cannot do is turn a 45 ACP gun into a 9mm gun with just a barrel and magazine swap. At least 3 things limit what you can swap out, magazine size, chamber size, and feed ramp size. There are other changes such as stronger recoil springs that need to be tweaked, I just listed a few. Others can chime in with those. Personally, if one were to get a full sized 1911, I would choose between a 38 Super and 45 ACP chambering and get a 22lr top end for cheap practice. The 9mm is a good round but is more at home in a smaller 1911 format as the round was originally developed to be used in a pistol with a 4" barrel and is more efficient for those who want a more concealable gun. That is not to say you can't have a full sized 9mm or a short 45 ACP. These are just generalities and certainly not carved in stone. I just remembered that you can shoot a 45 ACP in a gun designed for the 45 Super as they are the same sized cartridge and loaded round. The 45 Super uses stronger brass. You may or may not need a weaker recoil spring to shoot the 45 ACP.
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2010
  6. UncleFudd

    UncleFudd Member

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    Funny how things change as we get older also.
    I started carrying one of the Colt Commanders back in the 60s and then changed to the lightweight Commander whicH I carried until five years ago,
    A little arthritus caused me to change my calibers to 9MM but I still carry and shoot the 1911 frames.

    I too like the Springfields for my base frames. In fact I just got the EMP about 7 months ago and it is without a doubt the most accurate gun out of the box that I have ever fired. I am still amazed after nearly 2,000 rounds I have yet to have a single malfunction with it. I have shot varieties of ammo including my own loads through it and let my son-in-law and my wife shoot it and still no burps.

    But you bring up a question when considering the frame to build your "adaptable" platform.
    As mentioned, and I agree the 1911 frame is a good place to start, but whose base unit in milspec or top of the line unit to choose.

    What have you guys found in your latest experiences with different 1911 frames? It seems to me that nearly every major gun manufacturer now offers their own 1911 and some are actually extremely well built firearms. At my range, I see very few problems with any of the new 1911 firearms being purchased and used. Thos problems that I am made aware of are almost always operator error and easily explained and fixed.
    However just as with the poorest, (S&W) the Colt company seems to have forgotten who brung em to the dance. They have concentrated all their effort on the military firearms and sold out on the civilian market.
    I have talked to other dealers and gunsmiths and most agree that SA is by far the choice in quality and availability to any other 1911 producers. What have you guys and gals found in your experiences.

    Bob1010 might be interested in the responses to this and his original question when deciding on his platform. But I agree with hogger129 that getting the base 1911 and then a 22LR conversion is the way to go.

    UF
  7. sweetokole

    sweetokole New Member

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    Dec 26, 2009
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    As far as doing all that switcherooing one should look at the EAA Witness... one lower and a whole bunch of uppers. 22-10mm
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