steel casing ammo, your thoughts.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by cowboy898, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. cowboy898

    cowboy898 New Member

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    I have been watching the commercials about this new cheap ammo and I have to wonder if this is a bad thing. For years the government has been looking for a way to put a time limit on the age of ammo and I wonder if that is what this is? To the best of my knowledge you can not reload steel casings, so there is one limit. And steel rusts and will make the ammo unusable, limit number two. I know the cheaper ammo is a good thing, but at what expense? Let me know what you think about this.
  2. obxned

    obxned New Member

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    If you reload, the fact that the once-fired cases are useless to you is a big deal. For those of us who do not, less expensive steel cased ammo is a nice option.
  3. StoneChimney

    StoneChimney New Member

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    Steel cased ammo does not expand like brass does when firing and can impart more bolt thrust in rifle cartridges and quicker unlock times in pistols. It is also harder on extractors.
  4. carver

    carver Moderator

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    I don't buy it, and I don't shoot it in any of my guns. I figure that if it's bad news for my carbide dies, it's no good in gun either! I do reload what I shoot.
  5. Rhuga

    Rhuga New Member

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    Yep, I don't buy it either
  6. glens67

    glens67 Well-Known Member

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    I shoot it and don't currently reload. Mini 14 target and NRA Mini 14, 9mm, .45 1911. If it was bad for the guns, why would Hornady have steel cases?

    "Steel cased ammo does not expand like brass does when firing and can impart more bolt thrust in rifle cartridges and quicker unlock times in pistols. It is also harder on extractors."

    Steel Does expand when fired. It may not deform like brass.
    Impart more bolt thrust on bolt face. I don't think so.
    Harder on extractors, Possibly Wolf steel coating can cause extractor problems,

    Hornady
    Uncompromising accuracy and performance in a new economical alternative from Hornady
    Featuring Hornady Match rifle bullets or HAP (Hornady Action Pistol) handgun bullets, Steel Match ammunition is loaded at the Hornady factory with optimized propellant for each load that provides consistency and the highest levels of accuracy. Utilizing coated steel cartridge cases, and non-corrosive berdan primers, Steel Match ammunition delivers Hornady quality and performance, but with an economical price (saves as much as 40% when compared to brass case match ammo).

    Glen
  7. cowboy898

    cowboy898 New Member

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    Glens67,

    I did not mean that the ammo was bad for the gun, I was saying that it was bad because the ammo will not last as long as ammo with brass casings. I know it works good in firearms and does not damage them.

    I am talking about the amount of time that you will be able to store the ammo in an ammo can with out it going bad because the steel casings will rust through and we will not be able to use it. Thus putting a time limit on ammo.

    Did I state that right?

    Cowboy
  8. HunterAlpha1

    HunterAlpha1 Former Guest

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    for going to the range i would buy the cheaper ammo and use it that day. for stockpiling, stick with brass.
  9. cowboy898

    cowboy898 New Member

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    But what is going to happen if all ammo makers start making only steel cased ammo? we're screwed.
  10. American Leader

    American Leader Active Member

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    I use it and buy bulk when it's real cheap, real cheap! When I don't feel like picking up brass and just want to plink in my 7.62X39 & .223. I haven't noticed a problem yet, but would never consider it for serious shooting.
  11. reynolds357

    reynolds357 Former Guest

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    Steel case in actuality has a longer shelf life than brass.
  12. cowboy898

    cowboy898 New Member

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    I did not know that. Do you know the shelf life of steel?
  13. reynolds357

    reynolds357 Former Guest

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    Quality produced steel ammo which will be fully lacquered has an indefinite shelf life. It would only be limited by the decomposition rate of powder in a fully air tight container.
  14. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk New Member

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    open Russian ammo from WWII, looked brand new, like just manufactured.
    Have some 7.65 MN been open several years not showing any rust or
    corrosion. So far So good.
  15. cpttango30

    cpttango30 Guest

    I don't buy nice guns to use cheap crap ammo in them.

    My 3 main rifles are all $1k plus. I shoot reloads ONLY and in my 308 I use only Laupa Brass.
  16. warriflefan

    warriflefan New Member

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    I reload, but I like stocking up on ammo cheap too. It's nice to just go to the range and not have to worry about searching for brass, especially with my Makarov.

    It's lame when people tell you that you are going to blow up your rifle with steel cases, though. I mean seriously, I've been shooting the stuff since I was a kid and never had any problems except with my mosin before I got all the cosmoline out of the chamber.

    The steel doesn't shrink after expanding like brass does, which makes it harder to extract from a ruff chamber.
  17. warriflefan

    warriflefan New Member

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    Herters ammo from cabellas always shoots great for me. Just go for the poly coated steel and not the laquered stuff and you should be good to go.

    Lots of people buy milsurp to shoot and don't complain about it being non-reloadable.
  18. Little Rooster

    Little Rooster New Member

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    where did you get these results
  19. StoneChimney

    StoneChimney New Member

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    Glens67, steel does not expand or contract to the degree brass does. This results in the case possibly not 'gripping' the chamber walls on firing. You can see this on some rifles where steel cases that are ejected are obviously sooty compared to brass.

    When the case is temporarily pressed into the chamber wall, it is absorbing some of what would be transferred rearward onto the bolt face. Lilja Barrels, for example, estimates up to 50% of potential maximum bolt thrust is mitigated in this fashion. Less of that temporary grip on the chamber wall, the more thrust put on the bolt face.

    I don't worry too much about anything other than AR-pattern rifles in 7.62x39 - which is our second most popular caliber in that platform. There is only so much exterior diameter possible of the bolt, so to accommodate the larger case head metal has to be removed from the bolt face which makes the lugs more vulnerable in that design for that caliber. Extensive use of steel-cased ammunition in AR-pattern rifles chambered for 7.62x39 can cause premature locking lug failure.

    The extractor problem on these rifles is due to the lacquer coating combining with the soot blowback to create a 'sticky' chamber which can cause extractor breakage. Yes, steel-cased lacquer coated ammo with dirty powder (Wolf) will at first cause excessive bolt thrust then go to the other end of the spectrum and cause extractor failure.

    Our solution to this problem is to use upgraded Carpenter-158 bolts in that caliber and stronger extractor spring buffers. We have used the 9610-alloy AR15 SuperBolt with good success as well. We caution buyers against extensive use of steel-case ammo, particularly Wolf. There are other imported ammo brands (Golden Tiger) that do a fine job and don't seem to have the same degree of issue.
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2011
  20. Ken W

    Ken W New Member

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    Being on a limited income I have little choice but to use steel cased ammo, mostly .223, 9mm, 7.62x39 and 45 auto by Ulyanovsk and Tula from Wally World. I try to stay away from Wolf since I've had quite a few rounds start to gather rust in a short period of time in storage.
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