Stevens 22-410

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by LurpyGeek, Mar 21, 2009.

  1. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek Active Member

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    My father has a Stevens 22-410. He has owned it for four or five decades. He loaned it to some grand kids, just got it back and is getting interested in fixing it up a little.

    It is an over under with a .410 shotgun barrel and a .22 barrel. All the information I can find says that this model was originally .22 LR and the firearm itself is stamped .22 L, but this specific firearm is chambered in .22 Magnum. Someone must have had it altered (he's not the original owner). The bores look good, the breach is tight and it operates very well, but cosmetically it is in poor condition. The bluing has mostly come off and the wood on the stock was never finished very well originally (lots of machine markings). No rust though.

    I have a couple of questions:

    Is there an effective way he could blue it himself? I know that most cold bluing methods don't last very long and I don't know how well they would work on a full firearm anyway (I don't have much experience / knowledge with bluing). He has looked into having it professionally hot blued, but the lowest bid he found was ~$125.

    Also, if he were to get it in good condition, what kind of value would he be looking at. I've done a little research on this myself and seen a huge variety of answers. Book value says $140 - $160, but most quotes I see on the internet say this is a popular specimen and can go for $260 - $600.

    Thanks for any help you can give.
  2. PetahW

    PetahW New Member

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    The high end values you've seen are for pristine, original condition 22/410 specimens, either Savage 24's or Stevens 22-410's, with bright case colors on the receiver and no scratches in the wood or Tenite - or any refinishing, either.

    Certainly not for one subjected to a rechambering, as yours would have been if it accepts .22WRM ammunition - no matter what it's condition otherwise.

    I had three in 96%-99% original condition made from 1939 to 1951, and last year sold one for $450.
    I intend to sell a second, at a gun show next week, for at least $50 more than the first.

    [​IMG]

    Especially if you/he intends to keep it, then a refinish seems in order - given that it's already been mechanically altered, anyway.

    .
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2009
  3. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek Active Member

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    Any other suggestions for blueing / refinishing?
  4. Bill DeShivs

    Bill DeShivs Well-Known Member

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  5. PetahW

    PetahW New Member

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  6. LurpyGeek

    LurpyGeek Active Member

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  7. PetahW

    PetahW New Member

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    I don't have direct experience, but friends do - and they like the paste/gel better than the liquid because it can be controlled better.

    It's durable, as far as I can see on their guns.

    If you were actually considering painting the Stevens - what do you have to lose, $10 for a tube & a little time ?

    .
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