Steven's Favorite 22 Long Rifle

Discussion in 'The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum' started by MConn, Jun 19, 2007.

  1. MConn

    MConn New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ohio
    I have a Steven's FAVORITE (.22 cal) that was my great-grandfather's, and I was wandering if anyone would know when it was made if I told you that it's serial# is A 325 . And could anyone estimate the value of a FAVORITE in good and firing condition (it has none of the fancy stock designes and a full octagonal barrel) I know that they were made from 1890-1939, and I figure my grandfather bought his in the late 1800s because of the low serial#. Any other info. on the FAVORITES would be much appreciated. Thanks! (I have some great pictures, but can't post them...)
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2007
  2. MConn

    MConn New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ohio
    Is the extractor suppose to fully eject the empty casing, or simply allow you to be able to pull it out. (the casing almost gets jammed, and I can't pull it out unless I have a pair of pliers to do so.) Is this common?
    Also sometimes it takes several attempts to get the bullet to fire (is the firing pin too short/wore?...).
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2007
  3. Tom Militano

    Tom Militano New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,255
    Location:
    Jacksonville, AL
    Have you cleaned it good? You might have a really dirty chamber or it could just be really worn and allowing the brass to expand when it's fired.
  4. 22WRF

    22WRF Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    4,550
    Location:
    Pea Ridge, FL
    The extractor has a 1/2 moon shape. it goes back of the rim when the breech is closed and locked.

    On the old favorites that have been shot a ton of times are worn to where they will no longer engage the rim enough to extract the fired case.

    Open the breech and place a sent round in the extractor it should be a tight fit.

    If not needs replaced. Thats hard to do because it hard to find one not worn out. They turn up on ebay now and then but most are pretty well worn.

    All is not lost you can get one here and easy to replace


    http://www.wisnersinc.com/rifles/stevens/singleshotlever.html
  5. William Harper

    William Harper New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    44
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL 36106
    It was patented on October 29, 1889. Joshua Stevens and J.M. Thomas designed the .22 long rifle cartridge with 5 grains black powder and a 40 grain well-shaped lead bullet with a cup heel that gave and gives great accuracy. Stevens, an elderly but ingenious master machinist, designed the Favorite with classic lines but a very easily produced tilting block action that could be cleaned from the breach. It sold for $6.00 against the Winchester 1890 pump's $16.00. By 1892, it was headshooting squirrels with telescopic sights. The .25-10-67 and .32 Long rimfires came after 1895. Horace Kephart, the Librarian-writer who help create the Smokey Mountain National Park loved his take-down Favorite with scope and said he could shoot it better than any other rifle. By about 1910 Stevens Arms and Tool of Chicopee Falls, Mass. fell under control of an employee-administrator. In 1916, Westinghouse bought it and briefly it became 1916-1920 New England Westinghouse making mainly Mosin-Nagant 7.62-54mm rifles for WWI plus some very odd Favorites with long stocks and bayonet lugs before its sale to Savage ca.1921. Back to 1910.
    In that year .22 LR semi-smokeless loads appeared. Like the black powder loads they had corrosive fouling both from the powder and priming. You gave it a good cleaning from the breach and on all metal surfaces, then did it again in about a week to two weeks or got rust and pitting. Even if you did the second cleaning, you had better check on it within three to four weeks. That, pitting, and a bit of deformation around the extractor from firing pin strikes is what happened to the Stevens Favorite above. A gunsmith could probably easily restore full easy function, but you have not described the state of the bore or the finish or the wood very fully. The totality of these would help a professional estimate its value as a collector's item. You might even want to shoot it yourself and find the Lapua Master L the most accurate round for it- a +.001 diameter bullet for the old bore with exquisite lubrication. Think about it.
    You must think I am pretty well along in years to have this data on tap.
    Right! Alvin York gave me my first talk on shooting a rifle 61 years ago and my father started instructing me in six months. I've been getting better for 60 years as a rifleman. I love the little Favorite as my close range squirrel rifle and 300 meter plinker. Good luck on that old Favorite.
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2009
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum Steven's "Junior" Rifle No. 11 worth? Aug 29, 2012
The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum stevens favorite model 1915 Mar 27, 2014
The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum Stevens Favorite 1915 Dec 8, 2011
The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum stevens favorite 25 cal rimfire Oct 9, 2011
The Ask the Pros & What's It Worth? Forum My favorite bunch of helpers! Thanks!! Sep 29, 2011

Share This Page