Stock bedding & Parallax ?

Discussion in '.22-Rimfire Forum' started by Smokin Guns, Mar 9, 2003.

  1. Smokin Guns

    Smokin Guns New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4,462
    Location:
    "Gun Culture Members Clubhouse"...
    milmat1
    Member
    Posts: 2
    (1/7/03 4:45:00 pm)
    Reply Stock bedding & Parallax ?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I have two questions, One is how does bedding a stock make the gun more accurate ? I understand that you make the stock and action/barrel more like one piece, but since wood does not expand or contract in a uniform manner this may cause some additional stress on the barrel? Where as a floating barrel would seem to me more stable??
    My other question has to do with scopes, Exactly what is meant by parallax error ??
    Matt


    warpig883
    *TFF Staff*
    Posts: 5794
    (1/7/03 5:03:16 pm)
    Reply
    ezSupporter
    Re: Stock bedding & Parallax ?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Parallax-A condition that occurs when the image of the target is not focused precisely on the reticle plane. Parallax is visible as an apparent movement between the reticle and the target when the shooter moves his head or, in extreme cases, an out-of-focus image.


    I will let one of the guys who knows more than me answer the bedding question.
    Ignorance is a crime in 49 states. In the other one it is bliss.

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1737
    (1/7/03 6:03:09 pm)
    Reply Re: Stock bedding & Parallax ?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Glass bedding of the receiver area in the stock stiffens the wood to eliminate most of the shrinkage and warpage you refer to. Bedding the barreled action to the stock provides a stable platform with little or no shifting between the two.

    A free floated barrel has nothing touching it which allows natural viberations of the barrel when a bullet is pushed down the bore. All barrels ocillate upon firing which induces harmonics (barrel whip) and if able to be seen, would resemble a wet noodle being shaken. If anything disrupts this natural viberation, the bullet will depart the muzzle at different angles to the line of bore. With no hinderence, the bullet should leave the muzzle at the same point of ocillation at each firing.

    The current trend is to fully float barrels. The old method, and which many (including myself) still bed the chamber area of the barrel along with the recoil lug and receiver. This provides support for the critical chamber area to give the most solid bedding.
    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"


    milmat1
    Member
    Posts: 3
    (1/7/03 7:57:58 pm)
    Reply Re: Stock bedding & Parallax ?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Thanks for the explanations, and they are very good explanations i might add. It seems that parallax is the reason that using very large centerfire scopes on a .22 doesn't always work so well...Thanks again !!!


    gram22
    Member
    Posts: 33
    (1/7/03 8:44:27 pm)
    Reply Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I was thinking about getting one of those heavy target barrels for my 10/22, but I have a really nice walnut stock with checkered grips made for the standard barrel. Is it possible I could have a gunsmith modify the stock for a bigger barrel? If so, what would be a good price estimate of this task. I would probobly install the barrel msyelf of course.

    whiskey101
    Member
    Posts: 16
    (1/7/03 9:31:48 pm)
    Reply Re: Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A good gunsmith can do the stock work, no problem. However, if I were going to try a bull barrel, I would get a stock to fit it also and keep my nice stock uncut incase I did not like the results of the bull barrel. You can always sell the set up you chose not to use.
    So he cocked both his pistols, spit in the dirt, and walked out in to the street.

    brassduck
    Member
    Posts: 6
    (1/7/03 9:37:05 pm)
    Reply Re: Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    whiskey101, you typed the words that were in my thoughts.

    kdub01
    *TFF Senior Staff*
    Posts: 1743
    (1/7/03 10:55:25 pm)
    Reply Re: Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Yup, that's exactly my dilema at the moment.

    Have a 1990 mfg. Ruger 77/22 in .22 Mag. Decided to be smart and obtain one of the new Green Mountain heavy and fluted barrels for it in .17 HMR.

    Everything fit up just fine and headspaced great. Only problem, the barrel channel in the wooden stock is shaped for the standard 77/22 tapered barrel. Not wanting to ruin the present nicely turned and figured stock by inletting for the larger bull barrel, decided to get a replacement stock on the used market and whittle on it for the larger barrel. Ruger made a dimension change to the receiver in 1991 so all subsequent stocks are routed out for the longer receiver than my 1990 issue. Only recourse was to buy a new replacement stock from Ruger. They only want $204 + shipping for another stock to fit my 1990 action.

    Decided to leave the barreled action installed in the present stock, although it doesn't pull down into the forearm (not really bad looking, tho) all the way. Took it to the range and with the Burris 3x9 Compact scope, it shoots MOA at 100 yds. Guess I don't need that $204 stock as bad as I thought I did!


    "Keep Off The Ridgeline"


    gram22
    Member
    Posts: 34
    (1/8/03 10:01:37 pm)
    Reply Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Thanks for the advice guys, always the best. I came to the conclusion the other day that I have still only shot this rifle with open sights, so I don't even know how good it is with a scope yet. It might actually be good enough to where I should not care about a new stock and barrel, so I should probobly get the scope first. This way, I would be getting a part for the gun I know I absolutely want, without wasting money on other useless parts to pile up in my closet. I can tell you I already have enough computer parts in there to break my back, so why waste money to add to the clutter. Okay, enough bullsh!@#$ing, thanks again.

    milmat1
    Member
    Posts: 4
    (1/9/03 9:40:55 pm)
    Reply Re: Barrels and stocks.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    GEEZZ!! Did i start all this ?? HaHA.. Thanks for the help guys Got the 3x9x32 scope today can't wait to sight it in and see what i can do. I took apart the reciever on the 10/22 and pollished the inside and the bolt. The bolt is a trick to get out and back in but with a little practice its not to bad. One of the biggest problems i have found with this gun is the trigger, sheeww!! I know there are complete drop in trigger sets out there, is that the best way to go ?
Similar Threads
Forum Title Date
.22-Rimfire Forum Box Stock Factory Sporter Jul 16, 2014
.22-Rimfire Forum Stock Anschutz 1516 Jun 19, 2014
.22-Rimfire Forum Changed Stock On My Savage MKII-FVT Feb 22, 2014
.22-Rimfire Forum ATI stock for Ruger 10-22 May 21, 2013
.22-Rimfire Forum Does Anyone Have .22 Ammo in Stock? Jan 15, 2013

Share This Page